Best way to learn Irish?

arcadeparade

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Jan 30, 2009
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I got a B in the Irish Leaving a few years ago. My Irish leaves a lot to be desired and I'd like to be able to read this part of the forum and converse in Irish.

For someone who only knows the basics; dia duit, conas ata tu, ta me go maith, whats the best way to learn? Audio books or reading books or classes...Anyone with experience in this please let me know.
 


hurricane

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Nov 25, 2010
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Plus one on that, I can hold a limited conversation as gaelge with myself, but just do not have the confidence to speak to others. I don't need to write it or have all the complicated bits...the ones that Peig offers
 

deise go deo

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Nov 27, 2010
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I would recomend Buntús Cainte. Most bookshops should have it, if not they will be able to order it in.


I would also strongly recommend joining a ciorcal comhrá(conversation group)

List

They are a great way of practicing any new words you learn in a relaxed setting.

As for reading, Get a grammer book, and if you have time invest in classes.

Beir bua:)
 

Cael

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Jun 19, 2006
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I got a B in the Irish Leaving a few years ago. My Irish leaves a lot to be desired and I'd like to be able to read this part of the forum and converse in Irish.

For someone who only knows the basics; dia duit, conas ata tu, ta me go maith, whats the best way to learn? Audio books or reading books or classes...Anyone with experience in this please let me know.

The key to learning any language is to do a little bit every day. Its far better to just do five or ten minutes every day than doing an hour every so often. Remember that all you need to function in any language is 400 words. Native speakers use between 400 and 1500 words in their normal lives - most people far nearer to 400 than 1500. So, if you only learn one word per day, you will have a functional command of the language in only 400 days. (And you probably already know hundreds of words in Irish - its just to organise them into some kind of system.) If you have an ipod or any type of walkman, you can get CDs from your local library and copy them onto your player. Then just play it while you walk or whatever. You'd be amazed how much will sink in.

And, I consider it very important to have some kind of support group, if only to give your study focus. Your local library may have a free Irish class or conversation group. If there is no such group, put one together yourself. Say three people who are committed to meeting once a week. Learning Irish presents considerable challenges, but its very doable. Beir bua agus beannacht.
 

bettybotox

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Dec 8, 2010
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The key to learning any language is to do a little bit every day.
That was my fathers mantra, only his idea of a little bit was about 6 hours a day.
He filled a couple of 3 hour video tapes of an all Irish childrens tv show (broadcast somtime in the 1980s) and made us watch them back to back every day (mon-fri) during the school holidays. :eek:
Don't think it made me learn Irish though, it was slightly counter productive in that respect. :lol:
 

evercloserunion

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I wouldn't mind picking up a bit of Irish too. Might start watching Ros na Rún :p Has the episode with Stephen Fry been aired yet?
 

Cael

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That was my fathers mantra, only his idea of a little bit was about 6 hours a day.
He filled a couple of 3 hour video tapes of an all Irish childrens tv show (broadcast somtime in the 1980s) and made us watch them back to back every day (mon-fri) during the school holidays. :eek:
Don't think it made me learn Irish though, it was slightly counter productive in that respect. :lol:

Well, a chara, I don't want to say anything bad about your father, but...
 

ellie08

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I wouldn't mind picking up a bit of Irish too. Might start watching Ros na Rún :p Has the episode with Stephen Fry been aired yet?
I can never understand them on Ros na Run. I find Connemara Irish ( I know they don't all speak it) the hardest to understand. They never pronounce the end of the words (must be a touch of the French in them;))

I think watching sport or the weather or Nuacht are the best, because you have a visual understanding what is going on, so you don't have to rely on subtitles, and especially in sport a lot of the phrases are repeated over and over again.
 

hawkeye33

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Jul 12, 2008
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Would love to learn Irish myself,noe that my son has started school..Would help if I could speak it.
 

evercloserunion

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I can never understand them on Ros na Run. I find Connemara Irish ( I know they don't all speak it) the hardest to understand. They never pronounce the end of the words (must be a touch of the French in them;))

I think watching sport or the weather or Nuacht are the best, because you have a visual understanding what is going on, so you don't have to rely on subtitles, and especially in sport a lot of the phrases are repeated over and over again.
I remember trying to watch the deaf news when trying to learn sign language, and got completely lost. But then, I have a better grounding in Irish than I do in sign. So it could be helpful. News these days is so depressing though :( Teaching me Irish is little use if it also drives me to emigration!
 

dónal na geallaí

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I used to watch the Muppets and Spongebob Squarepants on Tg4 when the kids are young,picked up a lot of the meaning too.Maybe I'll do it when nobody is around!

Ellie - do you understand Donegal Irish?
 

ellie08

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I used to watch the Muppets and Spongebob Squarepants on Tg4 when the kids are young,picked up a lot of the meaning too.Maybe I'll do it when nobody is around!

Ellie - do you understand Donegal Irish?
Do you know Donal, once you get used to it, I actually find it the clearest. They really annunciate their syllables, and I think it is quite beautiful. I used to think it sounded awful, until I heard the lady from Altan on the beach behind me in West Clare with her Mum and her children chattering away in their Donegal Irish. When I hear it on the Nuacht, I really love it, much more so than Connemara Irish, which sadly, is sometimes unintelligible to me. Having said that I think German can sound beautiful too, so maybe some people would disagree with me.
 

DuineEile

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I recommend googling "benny the Irish polyglot" he has some good tips on picking up a language quickly.

The main one is to start speaking immediately. Harder in Ireland than in other countries, because finding someone to speak with can be hard, but they are out there.

D
 

FloatingVoterTralee

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May 8, 2009
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Watching TG4 is well recommended, the sports commentary is fairly straight forward to understand, the Nuacht on RnaG tends to be slower than conversational speech, but the best is to speak it in the ciorcal comhras, there tends to be in one in most large towns nowadays.
 


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