Bloody Sunday Killings ''UNLAWFUL''


Beachcomber

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I'd expect a moderator to comment - but who the f@@k am I kidding :rolleyes:
To comment about what?

Are you looking for someone to shut down discussion of any points that run counter to your biased outlook?

Aren't you confident of your arguments?
 

Antóin Mac Comháin

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Why were civilians standing about outside a British Army base while gun battles were going on?
Which ones? The ones you previously implied were combatants somehow connected to an un-related attack carried by the PIRA, the ones you implied were members of the PIRA on the Civil Rights March, the ones you implied, despite the finding of the Saville Inquiry that they were all innocent, had organized a riot, the one waving a white cloth, the one shot in the back, the one shot by three different soldiers or the one shot in custody?

"Mike Jackson, later to become head of the British Army, includes a disputed account of the shootings in his autobiography, and his then role as press officer for the British Army stationed in Belfast while the incidents happened. This account states that those killed in the shootings were Republican gunmen. This claim has been strongly denied by the Catholic families of those killed in the shootings, in interviews conducted during the documentary film The Ballymurphy Precedent.

The former Stormont first minister Arlene Foster of the DUP deferred a bid for extra funding for inquests into historic killings in Northern Ireland, a decision condemned by the human rights group Amnesty International. Foster confirmed she had used her influence in the devolved power-sharing executive to hold back finance for a backlog of inquests connected to the conflict. The High Court said "her decision to refuse to put a funding paper on the Executive basis was unlawful and procedurally flawed."

The conclusions you've drawn appear to be at odds with those of the relatives of the victims and you've plucked them from thin air, because the British High Court ruled that the refusal by Arlene Foster to allow funding for a proper inquest into the events was 'unlawful' and 'procedurally flawed', but you're making progress as you've refrained from implying that they were combatants in this post.
 

Beachcomber

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Which ones? The ones you previously implied were combatants somehow connected to an un-related attack carried by the PIRA, the ones you implied were members of the PIRA on the Civil Rights March, the ones you implied, despite the finding of the Saville Inquiry that they were all innocent, had organized a riot, the one waving a white cloth, the one shot in the back, the one shot by three different soldiers or the one shot in custody?

"Mike Jackson, later to become head of the British Army, includes a disputed account of the shootings in his autobiography, and his then role as press officer for the British Army stationed in Belfast while the incidents happened. This account states that those killed in the shootings were Republican gunmen. This claim has been strongly denied by the Catholic families of those killed in the shootings, in interviews conducted during the documentary film The Ballymurphy Precedent.

The former Stormont first minister Arlene Foster of the DUP deferred a bid for extra funding for inquests into historic killings in Northern Ireland, a decision condemned by the human rights group Amnesty International. Foster confirmed she had used her influence in the devolved power-sharing executive to hold back finance for a backlog of inquests connected to the conflict. The High Court said "her decision to refuse to put a funding paper on the Executive basis was unlawful and procedurally flawed."

The conclusions you've drawn appear to be at odds with those of the relatives of the victims and you've plucked them from thin air, because the British High Court ruled that the refusal by Arlene Foster to allow funding for a proper inquest into the events was 'unlawful' and 'procedurally flawed', but you're making progress as you've refrained from implying that they were combatants in this post.

It was an anti-internment march.

Nothing to do with civil rights.
 

Antóin Mac Comháin

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I do not think that you are correct in saying that the Civil Rights Movement was regarded as part of the conflict by the Irish government the time.
'Part of a war' - Gen Sir David Richards, a Northern Ireland veteran who rose to become the head of the UK's armed forces as chief of the defence staff, understands the pressures the paratroopers were under.

"Bloody Sunday was part of a war. These are warriors, soldiers who are going into a situation uncertain of what may happen next.'

[B]Relatives 4 Justice[/B]‏ @[B]RelsForJustice[/B] 8- “The passage of time has made prosecutions difficult... but should not be used as blanket immunity.... There should be no new laws to protect state killers”

"I cannot accept your apology, but I will accept your resignation" - Frances Meehan, whose brother was killed by security forces in Northern Ireland, tells #cblive about her meeting with Northern Secretary .


I was talking about the current Irish government, due to the manner with which so many of them were 'outraged' one day by Bradley's comments, and the next day they were saying they weren't seeking her resignation and that it was time to 'move on', thus implying that Bloody Sunday and the Ballymurphy Massacre were conflict-related incidents, which tallies with the views of Gen David Richards. The admission by the British that they were involved in a war in Ireland is to be welcomed, obviously, but the civilians who were killed in the Ballymurphy Massacre and during Bloody Sunday, weren't victims of that war. The Irish government should have weighed in behind the relatives of the victims, but they wouldn't have appointed Drew Harris in the first place, if they gave a flying f-k about the victims or their relatives.
 

mangaire2

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Good post.

For Provo supporters it's one law for the PIRA and another rule for the British security forces.
it is indeed 'one law for Irish Republicans and another rule for the British security forces'.
Irish Republicans have spent thousands of years in prison in the North for their 'misdeeds', & many for no 'misdeed' whatsoever,
while only 3 or 4 British soldiers have spent time in prison - I understand that the total time spent by British soldiers for their murderous activities in the North is something like 17 years ?

you are correct for once, mr Beachcomber -

it is indeed 'one law for Irish Republicans and another rule for the British security forces'
 

AhNowStop

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Are you now denying that there was a conflict?

Some of you continually call it a "war". Yet in this case you conveniently forget all about that.

When some IRA man is charged with offences, many of you bring up the conflict/war excuse, claiming that they can't have committed murder because they were soldiers in an army. You want such IRA men to walk free.
It was a civil rights march ffs .... why do people like you not have the common decency to simply admit that and admit that the british army murdered 13/14 innocent people that day ?

What is wrong with you ?
 

belcoo666

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It was a civil rights march ffs .... why do people like you not have the common decency to simply admit that and admit that the british army murdered 13/14 innocent people that day ?

What is wrong with you ?
Hes DUP , exactly the type and intellect that is making a laughing stock of the country they want be part of so much
 

McSlaggart

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It was an anti-internment march.

Nothing to do with civil rights.
Do you think internment was a good tactic?

"t, Heath gave ‘in principle’ agreement to Faulkner’s request – but he wanted Faulkner to take action against radical Loyalists so that internment did not seem entirely focused on Catholics and Nationalists. Heath’s advisors suggested the internment of Loyalist paramilitary leaders, the seizure of weapons from Loyalist gun clubs and an indefinite ban on Loyalist parades and marches. Faulkner rejected all of these proposals, only agreeing to a six-month ban on parades. Thus was born a great folly: Faulkner’s one-sidedness and Heath’s unwillingness to impose conditions on internment meant that it became almost entirely focused on Northern Ireland’s Nationalist community."

Internment in Northern Ireland
 

Fr. Ted Crilly

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soldier F has to answer for what he allegedly did on bloody sunday but the IRA get a pass ?

how many people did they murder ?
How many people did brit 'soldiers' murder in Dresden?
Good question....
Well over 100,000...
 

Marcella

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The Defence minister’s comments today were he didn’t even make reference to the victims or their families is damning of this conservative government. Whether the tories like it or not, a British army uniform does not bestow a license to kill on those who wear it. They really are a horrid shower.
 

michael-mcivor

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Incorrect. They have killed Prison and police officers and not to mention soldiers at Massereene.
The Real no longer exist- the two armed dissident groups active today- the Continuity and NewCo have never killed any brit soldiers- do try to keep up with facts-( the Real never killed another soul and quit after Vol Martin McGuinness called them traitors-)-
 

bang bang

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Brian Stack = Ferris threatens FF with "embarrassing information"

Jerry McCabe = witnesses intimidated to force a verdict of manslaughter

Jean McConville = Adams is innocent he's so innocent SF threatens the PSNi

Bloody Sunday = can't forget, never forget, have to prosecute
Jog on you disgusting individual, have you bought Martin any pints lately?
 
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