Bloody Sunday Killings ''UNLAWFUL''

Buchaill Dana

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Yes, one of criminal negligence, but not murder or manslaughter. Williams obviously had an ND, a Negligent Discharge, (and his GPMG should never have been cocked in the first place of course). He should have had the decency and integrity to own up and admit his appalling mistake and to take what punishment was coming to him, which I doubt would have been too onerous, a suspended sentence probably. Instead, he and his mates lied about what had happened and the Judge in turn gave him the benefit of considerable doubt, which he didn't deserve.
Obviously
 


Mickeymac

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Yes, one of criminal negligence, but not murder or manslaughter. Williams obviously had an ND, a Negligent Discharge, (and his GPMG should never have been cocked in the first place of course). He should have had the decency and integrity to own up and admit his appalling mistake and to take what punishment was coming to him, which I doubt would have been too onerous, a suspended sentence probably. Instead, he and his mates lied about what had happened and the Judge in turn gave him the benefit of considerable doubt, which he didn't deserve.

Your attempt at whitewashing a brutal murder of an innocent child by an occupying foreign army sarge is appalling to say the very least.
 

davidcameron

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You really do need to read some history.

This is just one example.
Judges sided with the security forces when it was obvious that there was a case to answer.
There's no reason to believe that the killing of Majella was deliberate. The soldier was negligent in his handling of his gun. It's not the judge's fault that he and his comrades lied. Sure, what motive would he have had to kill a little girl?
 

davidcameron

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Your attempt at whitewashing a brutal murder of an innocent child by an occupying foreign army sarge is appalling to say the very least.
Whatever about the deliberate killing of men, it's unlikely that a Para would have a motive to deliberately kill a little girl.
 

Mickeymac

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There's no reason to believe that the killing of Majella was deliberate. The soldier was negligent in his handling of his gun. It's not the judge's fault that he and his comrades lied. Sure, what motive would he have had to kill a little girl?

Same motivation they had against peaceful protesters on Bloody Sunday....the filthy low lifes.
 

sgtharper

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There's no reason to believe that the killing of Majella was deliberate.
No reason whatsoever, and not a shred of evidence to support such a theory.
The soldier was negligent in his handling of his gun. It's not the judge's fault that he and his comrades lied. Sure, what motive would he have had to kill a little girl?
Correct, only a fool would think otherwise
 

Mickeymac

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No reason whatsoever, and not a shred of evidence to support such a theory.
Correct, only a fool would think otherwise

Totally disgusted at two people defending state murder on a public forum, hang your heads in shame.
 

raetsel

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There's no reason to believe that the killing of Majella was deliberate. The soldier was negligent in his handling of his gun. It's not the judge's fault that he and his comrades lied. Sure, what motive would he have had to kill a little girl?
It was the judge's job to
There's no reason to believe that the killing of Majella was deliberate. The soldier was negligent in his handling of his gun. It's not the judge's fault that he and his comrades lied. Sure, what motive would he have had to kill a little girl?
10 to 12 lbs of pressure to pull the trigger?
It is clear that the judge gave the soldier the benefit of some substantial doubt there. That is the sort of bias which Gibson was actually notorious for.
The O'Hare family didn't get the justice in the courts, and the blame for that rests with him.
Anyway it is naive to assume that judges were paragons of virtue in an otherwise fU*ked up, deeply sectarian state where bias and discrimination was widespread in other state apparatus, when they largely belonged to the unionist establishment themselves.
But this is a side issue, and nothing to do with the forthcoming trial.
 


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