Bonnie Watch Revisited....

Buchaill Dana

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Its in the middle of the road Anton. Put there by Dissies to kick off with the cops and get people like you blaming Gerry Kelly for defending his community. As I said, you took the bait, hook, line and sinker

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milipod

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'By now you should all know what this page stands for. The point of it is there’s still ongoing internment of Irish citizens by the British establishment in the occupied 6 counties of our island and until the day the establishment ceases to exist in our land and people freed then republican youth across the occupation will continue to resist and expose them for what they are in any means necessary ie have bonfires in protest.'





If the bonfires were endangering peoples lives, I would most certainly condemn them, but there clearly isn't a danger to peoples homes and lives as Gerry Kelly claimed. Gerry Kelly is a member of the Policing Board, so how are the people opposing Internment and the attack on the New Lodge by more than 15 armored vehicles the Dissenters? Gerry Kelly is collaborating in the oppression of his own people, and the continuing armed occupation of Ireland, and if he had any dignity or self-respect left he would resign from the Policing Board. He's a traitor to his class, his community and his country.
Don't care grow up.
 

death or glory

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I have no idea what you are talking about. Were they worshipping sectarian murderers at the time? Care to elaborate?
So Ratsarse doesn't think the Hunger strike "H block rally" were sectarian murderers, hardly a surprise as he didn't think the Enniskillen bombing or Shankill bombing were sectarian murders either.
In fact he didn't think the IRA were involved in sectarian murders at all.
 

AhNowStop

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Strange our bonnie watchers missed this but here ye go...

Police have come under attack as they move in on a bonfire in the New Lodge area that is due to be lit on Thursday night.



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Sinister graffiti appeared close to the bonfire on Tuesday, threatening that if the structure is removed then a nearby community centre will be targeted.



All moronic childish bonfires should be banned and as far as I know all the main nationalist parties are 100% against them

Unlike your little loyalist bonfires as they get support from all the unionist parties

Once again your attempts at equivocation fail

Do you never tyre of failure ?

Did ye see what I did there aul han ;) har de har
 

Antóin Mac Comháin

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Its in the middle of the road Anton. Put there by Dissies to kick off with the cops and get people like you blaming Gerry Kelly for defending his community. As I said, you took the bait, hook, line and sinker

IMG-20190808-WA0006.jpg
Firstly, there's 1 armored vehicle in that picture. Have a look at the amount of them in the video on the Republican Sinn Féin site and decide for yourself who is lying and who is telling the truth.

Secondly, if concern for the community was the reason they wanted them removed, why have they called for the dismantling of bonfires everywhere?
 

death or glory

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Firstly, there's 1 armored vehicle in that picture. Have a look at the amount of them in the video on the Republican Sinn Féin site and decide for yourself who is lying and who is telling the truth.

Secondly, if concern for the community was the reason they wanted them removed, why have they called for the dismantling of bonfires everywhere?
Obviously all SF are natural born liars.
One trying to out lie the other i suppose,
Reb terrorism, such a counterproductive strategy,
 

bang bang

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If you put a stop to every bonfire on earth, it wouldn't make a blind bit of difference to global warming. It wouldn't even reduce CO2 levels from 385 parts/molecules per million to 384 parts/molecules per million. That is roughly 30% more than the levels which existed during each of the 24/5 periods of abrupt change. If you are so concerned about pollution, why don't you suggest slaughtering 90% of the cattle owned by the Big Farmers in the 6 Counties and the 26 Counties, and within 12 years the problem would be sorted, if it was replicated elsewhere.
You have a point Antoin, though I am partial to the occasional steak and Wicklow lamb. I also think vegans shouldn't be allowed to breed outside of their own kind!!
 

Antóin Mac Comháin

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You have a point Antoin, though I am partial to the occasional steak and Wicklow lamb. I also think vegans shouldn't be allowed to breed outside of their own kind!!
Well, I like a bit of steak myself, but I'm not lecturing anyone over a bit of CO2 whilst making my contribution to Ch4, which is 100 times more damaging. With the type of disruption that is coming, vegans will have a better chance of survival, and veganism may in fact be the only way for the next generation to survive the catastrophe which will follow the abrupt change.

Is the bang bang name borrowed from the Dublin character in the wheelchair who used to go around shooting everyone?
 

bang bang

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Well, I like a bit of steak myself, but I'm not lecturing anyone over a bit of CO2 whilst making my contribution to Ch4, which is 100 times more damaging. With the type of disruption that is coming, vegans will have a better chance of survival, and veganism may in fact be the only way for the next generation to survive the catastrophe which will follow the abrupt change.

Is the bang bang name borrowed from the Dublin character in the wheelchair who used to go around shooting everyone?
Yes, bang bang👍
 

Marcella

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The so called republican bonfires yesterday has really highlighted the differences in political leadership between Nationalism and Unionism.

While unionist politicians like East Belfast MP Gavin Robinson lined up to make mealy mouthed statements regarding dangerous and hate filled unionist bonfires, nationalist representatives have been very clear in their condemnation and appeal for the PSNI to uphold the law and protect working class areas from the hoods.
 

death or glory

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The so called republican bonfires yesterday has really highlighted the differences in political leadership between Nationalism and Unionism.

While unionist politicians like East Belfast MP Gavin Robinson lined up to make mealy mouthed statements regarding dangerous and hate filled unionist bonfires, nationalist representatives have been very clear in their condemnation and appeal for the PSNI to uphold the law and protect working class areas from the hoods.
Exactly the difference between nationalist and loyalist bonfires was clearly evident.
In the loyalist bonfires there were no violence in the build up even though we had 100 times more bonfires which were 100% larger bonfires yet no violence.
Whereas the few Reb bonfires resulted in a near fatality to one participant, another stab victim, 3 injured PSNI officers and violence and rioting in the lead up to the bonfire.
We do peaceful fun bonfires, youse do dissident recruiting bonfires.
 

McSlaggart

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Exactly the difference between nationalist and loyalist bonfires was clearly evident.
In the loyalist bonfires there were no violence in the build up even though we had 100 times more bonfires which were 100% larger bonfires yet no violence.
Whereas the few Reb bonfires resulted in a near fatality to one participant, another stab victim, 3 injured PSNI officers and violence and rioting in the lead up to the bonfire.
We do peaceful fun bonfires, youse do dissident recruiting bonfires.

If you do noting about criminal activity of course you have less trouble. Do you think the PSNI should ignore illegal activity?
 

death or glory

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If you do noting about criminal activity of course you have less trouble. Do you think the PSNI should ignore illegal activity?
As I said there was no violent or criminal activity at loyalist Bonnie's whereas it was prevalent
Throughout the New lodge one.
 

Antóin Mac Comháin

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What's so special about tonight?
Anti-internment parade banned from Belfast city centre

''Today mark's the 48th anniversary of the introduction of internment without trial by the occupiers and their eager collaborators.

Today, despite the sinister narrative peddled by pro occupation elements, internment is still alive and practised by the occupiers and their treacherous allies in the neo-colonial Free State. Over 60 Irish women and men languish in gaols for opposing the illegal occupation, indeed some of the current prisoner's were illegally interned 48 years ago on this day and severely tortured by the occupier and their eager allies.

So today whilst commemorating the 48th anniversary of internment by the occupiers take time to remember the women and men who after 800 years of illegal occupation are still behind the wire.

You are either on the side of the oppressed or the oppressor, there is no in between." - Saoradh an Mhumhain

The bonfires and protests were held to remember Internment, so let's examine the facts, and allow people to determine for themselves if Saoradh are lying, the SDLP are lying, Sinn Féin are lying, the British Courts are lying, the Guilford 4 are lying and if not, why Internment still exists, and how and why it has changed in nature.

A brief overview of the history of Internment and Irish Hunger Strikers - Part - 1

Many of you will recall the last occasion when Internment was introduced, in 1971, fewer among you will recall it in the 40's and 50's. Let us recall those dark days of 1980 and 1981, which followed on from the blanket and dirty protest begun by Kieran Nugent, who was to die a number of years ago a man broken and abandoned.

Who was Kieran Nugent? On 20 March 1973, aged 15, he was standing with a friend on the corner of Merrion Street and Grosvenor Road, when a car pulled up beside them and one of the occupants asked them for directions. Another occupant of the vehicle then opened fire with a sub machine gun. Nugent was seriously wounded after being shot eight times in the chest, arms and back by loyalists. A friend, Bernard McErlean, aged 16, standing nearby, was shot and killed.
Óglach Thomas Ashe, Kerry, 5 days, 25 September 1917
Óglach Michael Fitzgerald, Cork, 67 days, 17 October 1920
Óglach Terrence MacSwiney, Cork, 74 days, 25 October 1920
Óglach Joseph Murphy, Cork, 76 days , 25 October 1920
Óglach Dan Downey, 10 June 1923
Óglach Joe Witty, Wexford , 2 September 1923
Óglach Dennis Barry, Cork, 34 days, 20 November 1923
Óglach Andy O Sullivan , Cork, 40 days, 22 November 1923
Óglach Tony Darcy, Galway, 52 days, 16 April 1940
Óglach Jack 'Sean' McNeela, Mayo, 55 days, 19 April 1940
Óglach Sean McCaughey, Tyrone ,22 days, 11 May 1946
Óglach Michael Gaughan, Mayo , 64 days, 3 June 1974
Óglach Frank Stagg, Mayo , 62 days, 12 February 1976
Óglach Bobby Sands, Belfast , 66 days, 5 May 1981
Óglach Frank Hughes , Derry , 59 days, 12 May 1981
Óglach Raymond McCreesh , Armagh , 61 days, 21 May 1981
Óglach Patsy O Hara , Derry , 61 days, 21 May 1981
Óglach Joe McDonnell , Belfast , 61 days, 8 July 1981
Óglach Martin Hurson , Tyrone , 46 days, 13 July 1981
Óglach Kevin Lynch, Derry, 71 days, 1 August 1981
Óglach Kieran Doherty , Belfast , 73 days, 2 August 1981
Óglach Tom McIlwee , Derry , 62 days, 8 August 1981
Óglach Micky Devine , Derry , 60 days, 20 August 1981
 
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Antóin Mac Comháin

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A brief overview of the history of Internment and Irish Hunger Strikers - Part - 2

In September 1913 James Connolly went on Hunger Strike following his arrest and imprisonment for attending a public demonstration in support of labor strikes. Within a week he was released setting a precedent and example, not alone for Irish Socialists and Republicans, but indeed for Freedom Fighters and oppressed people throughout the globe, ranging from pacifists such as Mahatma Gandhi on the one hand, who underwent more than 17 Hunger Strikes against the British colonial regime in India, and on the other, although it was a tactic which Nelson Mandela personally opposed, it became a weapon of resistance for imprisoned Physical Force Nationalists in the ANC in South Africa.

On September 25th, 100 years ago, Tomás Pádraig Ághas, Thomas Patrick Ashe, became the first Irish Nationalist to die on Hunger Strike from force feeding. Ashe was the first of 23 Irish Republicans who would die as a direct result of Hunger Striking, becoming one of approximately 150 Republican volunteers from County Kerry who paid the ultimate price between the 1916 Easter Rising, the War of Independence, the Civil War and the conflict which continued in the following decades.

Born on the 12 January 1885, in Lispole, County Kerry, during his brief life Ashe was a member of the GAA, the Gaelic League, President of the Irish Republican Brotherhood as well as being a founding member of the Irish Volunteers. He spent the last years of his life before his death teaching children. Ashe Commanded the Fingal Battalion of the Irish Volunteers during the 1916 Easter Rising, leading a force of 60-70 men which engaged regular full-time professional British soldiers around north County Dublin and the borders of County Meath, where they won a major morale-boosting battle in Ashbourne against a numerically superior force, capturing a significant quantity of arms, killing eleven enemy troops and losing only two Republican volunteers.

In August 1917, Ashe was arrested and charged after making a seditious speech during an anti-conscription meeting in Ballinalee, County Longford, where Michael Collins had also been speaking. Sentenced to two years hard labour he was detained at the Curragh, County Kildare, before being transferred to Mountjoy Prison in Dublin where he joined a Hunger Strike which commenced on the 20th of September seeking Prisoner Of War status. After ten day, on the 29th of September, the prisoners were told that they would be treated as POW's and accorded POW Rights, and the strike was then called off. At the subsequent inquest into his death, the jury condemned the prison staff for the "inhuman and dangerous operation performed on the prisoner, and other acts of unfeeling and barbaric conduct".

1920 Hunger Strike

During the War of Independence, commonly known as the Tan War, the British Government had withdrawn the political status which had been won after the death of Thomas Ashe in 1917. On the 11th of August 1920, a mass strike was once again initiated, beginning in Cork Jail, when 60 IRA volunteers, most of whom were held without charge or trial, demanded reinstatement of political status and release from prison. The British had hardened their attitude against political status following a strike in April, opting to risk the deaths of prisoners rather than make concessions. Three of those prisoners were Michael Fitzgerald, Terence MacSwiney and Joseph Murphy. Michael Fitzgerald was the first of the three to die on the 17th of October after 67 days on Hunger Strike. Terence MacSwiney was elected as the Sinn Féin Lord Mayor of Cork during the War of Independence, had been arrested by the British on charges of sedition and imprisoned in Brixton Prison in England. He died on the 25th of October, after 74 days on Hunger Strike. Joseph Murphy also died on the 25th of October, on the same day as MacSwiney. The strikes continued for a further three weeks, and following a request from Arthur Griffith, acting President of the Irish Republic, the remaining nine prisoners on ended their fast on 12 November 1920.

1923 Civil War Hunger Strike

''We are not going to force feed you, but if you die we won't waste coffins on you. You will be put in orange boxes and you will be buried in unconsecrated ground.'' - Ernest Blythe.

Although the Irish Civil War had officially ended on the 24th of May, 1923, the Irish State continued it's personal vendetta against Republicans. Earlier in the year in February 1923, several members of Cumann na mBan, including Mary and Annie MacSwiney, Lily Brennan and Nellie Ryan, sister-in-law of the Free State's Commander-in-Chief and Defence Minister Richard Mulcahy embarked on a Hunger Strike which lasted for 34 days. They were protesting against the inhuman prison conditions, bad food, and the fact that they were imprisoned without trial. The strikes indirectly led to the death of at least one young lady, May Zambra, who was only 17 years of age when she went on Hunger Strike and 23 years of age when she died six years later due to ill-health. Two more Hunger Strikers, Dan Downey, 10 June 1923 and Joe Witty, 2 September 1923, were to pass away before the protest reached a crisis point at a later date.

An estimated 12,000 Republican prisoners, both men and women, were suffering unnecessary and intolerable prison conditions. By October of 1923 with tensions at an all-time high and no foreseeable end game in sight, an announcement was made by Michael Kilroy, OC of the IRA POW's in Mountjoy, that a decision had been reached by the prisoners to embark on a mass strike which soon spread to other jails, and within days more than 7,000 prisoners had joined the protest.

The figures given by Sinn Féin at the time were Mountjoy Jail - 462; Cork Jail - 70; Kilkenny Jail - 350; Dundalk Jail - 200; Gormanstown Camp - 711; Newbridge Camp - 1,700; Tintown 1,2,3, Curragh Camp - 3,390; Harepark Camp - 100; North Dublin Union - 50 women.

The Free State Government had passed a motion outlawing the release of prisoners on Hunger Strike, but because of the large numbers at the end of October they sent a delegation to Newbridge Camp to speak with the IRA leadership in the jail. However, it soon became apparent that they were not there to negotiate, but rather to give the prisoners a message from the Government that ''we are not going to force feed you, but if you die we won't waste coffins on you, you will be put in orange boxes and you will be buried in unconsecrated ground." The negotiations were abandoned and the strike went forward. Poorly planned the protest began to unravel within weeks, with many prisoners abandoning the strike. In Cork those who went off strike said they'd been promised that 33 of their comrades would be released within 48 hours and the rest within 3 weeks, but by the end of October, there were still 5,000 prisoners on strike.

Two more prisoners were to die, Dennis Barry on 20 November 1923, after 34 days on strike, followed two days later by Andy O Sullivan, Cork, who passed away on 22 November 1923 after 40 days on strike. With the deaths of Barry and Sullivan drawing no positive response or concessions from the Free State government, the IRA leadership ordered an end to the strikes, and on the 23rd of November the protests ended. While the strike itself failed to win immediate releases, with the Government worried about the political impact of more deaths, a process began which saw prisoners being released slowly, although some prisoners remained in jail until as late as 1932.

Health complications caused by a lack of adequate medical attention and the deplorable conditions in which the prisoners were held, led to the untimely deaths shortly after release of many, including the aforementioned May Zambra and Joe Lacey. Harsh conditions continued to prevail in the prisons throughout the decade, which led to further loss of life such as that of Seán Glynn who took his own life in 1936 following an extended period in isolation. Back to the future..

Saoirse - Leitrim Republican protests over Public Order sentence

''The charges, brought against Declan Curneen and fellow Republican Thomas Kelly, related to the sale of Easter lilies and the removal of a Union Jack flag from the premises of Donnelly Vision System Europe Ltd in Manorhamilton in March last year.

The arrest appeared to be timed to disrupt Declan Curneen’s involvement in the Anti-Stormont Campaign in the Six Counties, where Republican Sinn Fein was calling for a boycott of the May 30 sham election.

On his arrival at Mountjoy jail, Dublin on May 20 Declan Curneen immediately went on a hunger strike to seek a transfer to Limerick jail to join the nine other Republican prisoners there. In North Leitrim posters were erected all over the area calling for his immediate release.''

Declan Curneen died from ill-health within a few years of his release, in the same way that people like May Zambra and Joe Lacey died from ill-health in the 1920s. It's quite sad really when you think about the crime he committed - He removed the Union Jack from a flagpole. Did he really deserve to be put in the dungeons of Mountjoy for that? If the State had shown a bit of mercy, and allowed him to serve his few weeks as a political prisoner, perhaps he'd be blowing a tin whistle somewhere tonight?'
 
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