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Booming Irish burglary rate 56% higher than New York's


patslatt

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See Cities With The Most Burglaries - Yahoo! Finance New York City reported 18,000 burglaries in 2011. Its population is double Ireland's: http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcp/html/census/popcur.shtml . CSO reported 28,000 burglaries in 2011 for Ireland.http://www.cso.ie/Quicktables/GetQuickTables.aspx?FileName=cja01c12.asp&TableName=Burglary+and+related+offences&StatisticalProduct=DB_CJ In my opinion, Ireland's higher burglary rate could be explained mostly by lenient short sentencing of professional burglars,probably drug addicts. Minor factors could be higher reporting of crime by Irish crime victims and Americans' dislike of second hand consumer goods.

What to do? Legalising the consumption of drugs as in Portugal's apparently successful legalisation would be difficult for Ireland's conservative society to accept. But it would remove the need for our small army of addicts to burgle for a fix. Building more prisons is the obvious alternative. However,high wage costs of prison guards and inefficiencies of prison administration have driven the cost of imprisonment to around €150,000 a year per prisoner,an unacceptably high figure. Maybe the government should just give addicts €100,000 a year each to buy drugs to save the cost of processing them through the courts and imprisoning them!
 
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Mr. Bumble

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[h=2]Booming Irish burglary rate 56% higher than New York's[/h]
I feel so proud. *Wipes patriotic tear from eye*.
 

EvotingMachine0197

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More guns, more CCTV and security, less seclusion, more cops, tougher laws and sentences, secured apartment blocks etc.

Not surprised really.
 

Truth.ie

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See Cities With The Most Burglaries - Yahoo! Finance New York City reported 18,000 burglaries in 2011. Its population at night is about four million,close to Ireland's,and maybe double that by day. CSO reported 28,000 burglaries in 2011 for Ireland.CSO QuickTables - CJA01 - Burglary and related offences In my opinion, Ireland's higher burglary rate could be explained mostly by lenient short sentencing of professional burglars,probably drug addicts. Minor factors could be higher reporting of crime by Irish crime victims and Americans' dislike of second hand consumer goods.

What to do? Legalising the consumption of drugs as in Portugal's apparently successful legalisation would be difficult for Ireland's conservative society to accept. But it would remove the need for our small army of addicts to burgle for a fix. Building more prisons is the obvious alternative. However,high wage costs of prison guards and inefficiencies of prison administration have driven the cost of imprisonment to around €150,000 a year per prisoner,an unacceptably high figure. Maybe the government should just give addicts €100,000 a year each to buy drugs to save the cost of processing them through the courts and imprisoning them!
Give criminals with addictions 100k a year to feed their habit???
Are you for real.
Reopen spike Island and use the "do-nothing" Army to patrol it.
In some countries, the prisoners are not given food and their families outside have to provide it.
 

olli rehn

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I heard a rumour that these break-ins are not done by the usual suspects- but by employees of foreign bondholders who want to make sure that they squeeze every single cent out of Ireland....
 
D

Dylan2010

Economic stimulus surely, the locksmith, insurance, garda time and court time for the extra zing. Thank you junkies, travellers and assorted scroats, you do your country proud
 

Truth.ie

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cash for gold, cash for gold... easy peasy
Most of the burglaries in my area would be unfinished houses or houses for sale (and empty), that have been stripped of copper pipes, wiring, and fittings like fireplaces etc.
Emptying home-heating oil tanks in rural areas is also very common.
Am I right in thinking car theft is down from say the 80's???
It certainly seems so.
 

gatsbygirl20

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Most of the burglaries in my area would be unfinished houses or houses for sale (and empty), that have been stripped of copper pipes, wiring, and fittings like fireplaces etc.
Emptying home-heating oil tanks in rural areas is also very common.
Am I right in thinking car theft is down from say the 80's???
It certainly seems so.
Yes, cars always being nicked in the 80s---many of them second-hand, with a chain round the steering, easy to open door-locks, etc. Some vandals would rob the windscreen wiper and use it to open the door, and then they would hot-wire the car..

Now new technology means that your ignition is like a computer. It is very difficult to start a car without the key..

So now vandals break into houses to get the car keys, waking sleeping residents demanding keys (A Garda told me of a resident who was wakened by the sound of someone boiling his electric kettle downstairs in the kitchen. The thief carried the boiling kettle upstairs to the bedroom and quietly asked for car keys)

Leave your keys downstairs. It's only a car.

Laptops and jewelry are the new must-haves as far as thieves are concerned.
 

mayoonmymind

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Economic stimulus surely, the locksmith, insurance, garda time and court time for the extra zing. Thank you junkies, travellers and assorted scroats, you do your country proud

We can blame everyone and anyone for the crime rate in Ireland.
It will increase if the Gardai are not dragged out from their desks and forced out on the streets to deter and fight crime.
This time-wasting signing dole and passport forms is madness while criminals are taking over our cities and towns making them into no go areas.
Were is the commissioner? As a public servant he should be questioned on his lack of action.
Why has the media avoided this issue like the plague.
Are they reluctant to question the law enforcers lest they have their tyres kicked. ?
What conceivable reason could the media have for dodging this issue
Perhaps when the present government has done with the abortion issue they might consider arming the gardai. At least they would have something to fight with rather than hiding behind their desks afraid to face the armed gurriers on our streets.
 

patslatt

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Broken society thanks to excessive liberalism. Joey Scumbag with 154 previous convictions has only the disincentive of the boredom of appearing before a dumbass judge to not rob again. Then it's back to his rent free accommodation and 42 inch plasma.
A guy with five drunken driving convictions and over a thousand previous convictions made headlines last week. In contrast to California's "three strikes and you're out" (ie life sentence on the third conviction for a crime),it seems many of Ireland's professional criminals can go on forever.
 

seabhcan

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Sep 3, 2007
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We can blame everyone and anyone for the crime rate in Ireland.
It will increase if the Gardai are not dragged out from their desks and forced out on the streets to deter and fight crime.
This time-wasting signing dole and passport forms is madness while criminals are taking over our cities and towns making them into no go areas.
Were is the commissioner? As a public servant he should be questioned on his lack of action.
Why has the media avoided this issue like the plague.
Are they reluctant to question the law enforcers lest they have their tyres kicked. ?
What conceivable reason could the media have for dodging this issue
Perhaps when the present government has done with the abortion issue they might consider arming the gardai. At least they would have something to fight with rather than hiding behind their desks afraid to face the armed gurriers on our streets.
"gardai on the streets" is not an intelligent way to catch criminals. Solid investigation work is the only real way. Go after the money. To stop people stealing cars go after the guys who buy stolen cars - the market will dry up.
 

seabhcan

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Sep 3, 2007
Messages
14,327
A guy with five drunken driving convictions and over a thousand previous convictions made headlines last week. In contrast to California's "three strikes and you're out" (ie life sentence on the third conviction for a crime),it seems many of Ireland's professional criminals can go on forever.
The US spends 10% of its GDP on the prison system. Thats not a good solution either.
 

NYCKY

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Apr 17, 2010
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13,100
See Cities With The Most Burglaries - Yahoo! Finance New York City reported 18,000 burglaries in 2011. Its population at night is about four million,close to Ireland's,and maybe double that by day. CSO reported 28,000 burglaries in 2011 for Ireland.CSO QuickTables - CJA01 - Burglary and related offences In my opinion, Ireland's higher burglary rate could be explained mostly by lenient short sentencing of professional burglars,probably drug addicts. Minor factors could be higher reporting of crime by Irish crime victims and Americans' dislike of second hand consumer goods.

What to do? Legalising the consumption of drugs as in Portugal's apparently successful legalisation would be difficult for Ireland's conservative society to accept. But it would remove the need for our small army of addicts to burgle for a fix. Building more prisons is the obvious alternative. However,high wage costs of prison guards and inefficiencies of prison administration have driven the cost of imprisonment to around €150,000 a year per prisoner,an unacceptably high figure. Maybe the government should just give addicts €100,000 a year each to buy drugs to save the cost of processing them through the courts and imprisoning them!

Not sure where you are getting the stats on the NYC population as they are not quoted in the link, but NYC has over 8 million residents and if you want to talk about just Manhattan that has a population of about 1.6 million but nothing like 4 million at night.

New York City is now the safest big city in America and has been for a while.
 

patslatt

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Joined
Apr 11, 2007
Messages
13,693
Most of the burglaries in my area would be unfinished houses or houses for sale (and empty), that have been stripped of copper pipes, wiring, and fittings like fireplaces etc.
Emptying home-heating oil tanks in rural areas is also very common.
Am I right in thinking car theft is down from say the 80's???
It certainly seems so.
Japanese cars with poor locks were easy to steal because car theft was unknown in Japan. In the past 15 years,Japanese car makers woke up to that and put in good locks. England had the same problem a generation ago- a joke about Ford Cortina said that the key to any one Cortina was a master key for all Cortinas.
 

Truth.ie

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Oct 5, 2008
Messages
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"gardai on the streets" is not an intelligent way to catch criminals. Solid investigation work is the only real way. Go after the money. To stop people stealing cars go after the guys who buy stolen cars - the market will dry up.
Who buys stolen cars in Ireland??
i thought most of the car theft was for joyriding and later burning.
 
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