Border in the Irish sea :

McSlaggart

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I would like out politicians to get their act together and explain in detail how this will work. Boris is in charge so its imperative that people give him a good working solution rather than have him make it up as he goes along.


1
The knock-on effect is that Northern Ireland alone will have no tariffs on trade with the Republic of Ireland, but the rest of the UK will. And that leaves a bit of a problem.

Let’s say you were trying to sell Welsh lamb to Ireland and, after the end of the transition period, the EU charged a tariff on British lamb imports. Under the rules detailed above, you could (instead of shipping directly to Dublin, incurring a tariff) ship your lamb from Wales to Belfast (with no tariff) and then over land to Dublin (with no tariff). In effect you’d have got your lamb into Dublin tariff-free, making a mockery of EU tariff rules.

So the UK government and the EU have come up with a fix—the border in the Irish sea.

EU tariffs will be applied to selected goods crossing from the rest of the UK into Northern Ireland. Any good which is deemed as “at risk” of moving into the EU after crossing into Northern Ireland will be subject to the EU tariff—a definition of an “at risk” good is yet to be decided.

Experts have said it’s likely that most UK exports to Northern Ireland won’t face a tariff.

But this means there will be customs checks and controls on goods crossing from the rest of the UK into Northern Ireland, in order to ensure the correct tariffs are applied. This also applies to goods entering Northern Ireland from other non-EU countries.

If the “at risk” good crossing into Northern Ireland doesn’t end up in the EU, traders will have paid the EU tariff rate, when they should have paid the UK tariff instead. In those cases, traders will be entitled to a refund from the UK government, provided the UK tariff is lower.


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Newton Emerson: High cost to business of Irish sea border makes it look completely unworkable
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Owen Polley: Now even the DUP party seems prepared to go along with ‘best of both worlds’ hokum about Northern Ireland post Brexit
Fuelled by a ‘patriotic breakfast’ of sausages, baked beans, bacon and eggs, David Frost set off this week to strong-arm the EU into a Canada style trade deal.


 


shiel

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The fact that English racist Brexiteers voted to tear up the Belfast/Good Friday Agreement demonstrates the contempt they have for international agreements not to mention for their fellow European citizens and of course for Paddy.

There is no end of consequences they will impose on Europe, Ireland and indeed the UK to pursue that contempt to its logical conclusion.
 
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blinding

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As soon as they can get away with it Big Island Brits are going to land ye with the 6 Counties . Don’t $hit yer’selves.
 

omgsquared

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As soon as they can get away with it Big Island Brits are going to land ye with the 6 Counties . Don’t $hit yer’selves.
But only after they agree to pay off our national debt of 200bn, Then it will take us another 50 years to build up another 200bn national debt.
 

Dame_Enda

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I would like out politicians to get their act together and explain in detail how this will work. Boris is in charge so its imperative that people give him a good working solution rather than have him make it up as he goes along.


1
The knock-on effect is that Northern Ireland alone will have no tariffs on trade with the Republic of Ireland, but the rest of the UK will. And that leaves a bit of a problem.

Let’s say you were trying to sell Welsh lamb to Ireland and, after the end of the transition period, the EU charged a tariff on British lamb imports. Under the rules detailed above, you could (instead of shipping directly to Dublin, incurring a tariff) ship your lamb from Wales to Belfast (with no tariff) and then over land to Dublin (with no tariff). In effect you’d have got your lamb into Dublin tariff-free, making a mockery of EU tariff rules.

So the UK government and the EU have come up with a fix—the border in the Irish sea.

EU tariffs will be applied to selected goods crossing from the rest of the UK into Northern Ireland. Any good which is deemed as “at risk” of moving into the EU after crossing into Northern Ireland will be subject to the EU tariff—a definition of an “at risk” good is yet to be decided.

Experts have said it’s likely that most UK exports to Northern Ireland won’t face a tariff.

But this means there will be customs checks and controls on goods crossing from the rest of the UK into Northern Ireland, in order to ensure the correct tariffs are applied. This also applies to goods entering Northern Ireland from other non-EU countries.

If the “at risk” good crossing into Northern Ireland doesn’t end up in the EU, traders will have paid the EU tariff rate, when they should have paid the UK tariff instead. In those cases, traders will be entitled to a refund from the UK government, provided the UK tariff is lower.


2
Newton Emerson: High cost to business of Irish sea border makes it look completely unworkable
3
Owen Polley: Now even the DUP party seems prepared to go along with ‘best of both worlds’ hokum about Northern Ireland post Brexit
Fuelled by a ‘patriotic breakfast’ of sausages, baked beans, bacon and eggs, David Frost set off this week to strong-arm the EU into a Canada style trade deal.


I heard about the issue of the cost of customs checks in the Irish sea aswell. A meeting of NI farmers representatives. Ultimately the Unionist part of the business community are going to have to look at avoiding such costs by increasing trade with the Republic and the EU. I understand that one third of NI milk is sold in the Republic. Newsnight said last year that if there are tariffs between NI and the Republic, that could collapse demand leading to a cull of cattle in NI. The only alternative to checks on the island are checks at the ports.

The reality is that most Unionists dont live on the border and are less familiar with the importance of cross border trade and cross border labour movements in both directions.
 
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shiel

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But only after they agree to pay off our national debt of 200bn, Then it will take us another 50 years to build up another 200bn national debt.
A small number of our most powerful and most reckless citizens actually ran up that debt in a decade or so before 2010.

It is ironic that the same people signed the Belfast/Good Friday Agreement with the UK which the Brexiteers may now be in the process of tearing up.
 

JacquesHughes

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Economic Borders Everywhere

The UK government itself has come up with the idea of ‘free ports’ [ they do like the sound of ‘free’], with the vague appearance of levelling up ‘the north’.
So, they’ve already accepted the principle and the challenge of an ‘economic border’ around Sunderland.
 

shiel

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Economic Borders Everywhere

The UK government itself has come up with the idea of ‘free ports’ [ they do like the sound of ‘free’], with the vague appearance of levelling up ‘the north’.
So, they’ve already accepted the principle and the challenge of an ‘economic border’ around Sunderland.
Sunderland is in England and is not involved with the Belfast/Good Friday Agreement.
 

shiel

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Did Johnson agree to an Irish sea border?

Is he welshing on it now?
 

JacquesHughes

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Johnsonian Mischief and the British Negotiating Position.

Know that this is a strategy- to have as much uncertainty about the Irish border as he can, at the very beginning of the talks! The DUP are loving it; so he's repaired bridges with them.

The EU is supposed now to RENEGOTIATE the agreement on Northern Ireland, all the time wondering 'will he, won't he?' keep his word on what he's agreed already!

If the border is the distraction, what's the 'big picture'?
Answer: exploitation of the EU's Single Market.
The UK wants it's economic USP to the rest of the world to be, 'We have a unique relationship with the 27 countries of the EU. Bring your FDI to us, we're just offshore from the EU, we're more sympathetic to your regulatory differences, we have financial services as if they're in the EU, there's no need for you to deal with the Brussels bureaucracy'.
 

JacquesHughes

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'Ask Yourself What, Yes, You Sir, in the EU ...can you do to help Britain's exit be a success?'

The EU has made colossal mistakes in the UK negotiations so far- not by the professional negotiators, by the political leadership.

In the summer of 2019, the EU allowed them a 'don't waste it' 3m extension of their membership. Oh, they didn't- they used it to hold a farcical Tory Party internal election, and present the EU with a new negotiating team and new demands.
Even so, still not learning, in the winter of 2019, the EU allowed the UK another extension, this time long enough for them to hold a general election, and present the EU with a new UK government and a new hard-line mandate.

Now, there's only hypocritical cant, no substance , in their talk about 'partnership' with the EU. The sole aim of the negotiators is to use the EU's market for the UK's benefit.
Donald Trump's approach is their ideal- 'the other side are held to observing the rules, and we change them unilaterally'.

The correct response by the EU's leadership would be: offer a cautious 'bare-bones' Treaty with the UK, for a time-limited period eg 4 years, extension subject to good behaviour wrt the Irish border.

Something like this will have to be done. The UK is now convinced ( they've seen very convincing evidence) that the EU will enter into a long-term disadvantageous relationship, rather than endure the disruption of a clean-break Brexit.
 

McSlaggart

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Johnsonian Mischief and the British Negotiating Position.

Know that this is a strategy- to have as much uncertainty about the Irish border as he can, at the very beginning of the talks! The DUP are loving it; so he's repaired bridges with them.

The EU is supposed now to RENEGOTIATE the agreement on Northern Ireland, all the time wondering 'will he, won't he?' keep his word on what he's agreed already!

If the border is the distraction, what's the 'big picture'?
Answer: exploitation of the EU's Single Market.
The UK wants it's economic USP to the rest of the world to be, 'We have a unique relationship with the 27 countries of the EU. Bring your FDI to us, we're just offshore from the EU, we're more sympathetic to your regulatory differences, we have financial services as if they're in the EU, there's no need for you to deal with the Brussels bureaucracy'.

The problem Boris has is that the EU know what he is about and will not fall for it. I do not think Boris will keep his word as the man is without honor. That said I also do not think Boris understands that the EU will have detailed plans to deal with that outcome.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
How's the old land-sea-wall-tunnel-bridge coming along? :)
 

McSlaggart

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US Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi has warned that there will be no trade agreement if there are any threats to the Good Friday Agreement.

Congressman Richard Neal, the Chair of the House Committee that will oversee any future trade deal, has issued the same warning.

"I want to sit down and talk to Richie about this," Mick Mulvaney says.

"I think Richie and Nancy are on to something there. If there is a hard border there are going to be difficulties and not everyone here has grasped that."

He says he’ll be focussed on America’s commitment to peace and prosperity in Northern Ireland.

 


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