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Boy who missed deadline because of sister's death cannot get place in secondary school.

davidcameron

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Boy (13) has no school to attend as he missed application deadline due to his sister passing away from cancer - Independent.ie

A 13-year-old boy has no secondary school to attend this year as his application was late because his sister passed away from cancer during the deadline.

Lee Moore (13) from Portlaoise had to watch his primary school friends attend St Mary’s CBS Secondary School last week and was unable to join them due to the school’s zero tolerance policy for late applications.

Lee’s mum Ann Marie Moore said the school had “absolutely no sympathy” for the family.


Principal at St Mary’s CBS Secondary School said she recognised the tragic circumstances of the case and will contact the mother "the minute" a place comes available.

Maura Murphy said that while the circumstances are "tragic" she was obliged to follow the school policy in regards to late admissions.

“I met with Ms Moore on a number of occasions to discuss the issue after the process was closed. If she had come to me during the process last December and explained her situation I might have been able to do something about it then,” Murphy told Independent.ie.

“I met her two weeks ago too out of courtesy to explain the situation hadn’t changed. I’m working my way through the waiting lists and late lists but I can’t pull another child out of the school to give her child a place.
I don't see how letting him become a pupil at the school would displace another pupil.

I believe that the ASTI's inflexibility on the maximum number of pupils that each of its members can teach is a serious issue. I doubt that letting in one more child would inconvenience teachers at that school.
 


Cato

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Schools have to stick rigidly to their enrollment policy or they will leave themselves open to action by unsuccessful applicants. While they might want to make ad hoc exceptions in the kind of circumstances detailed in the OP, the appeals board that would oversee this will not take this into account but will simply look at the enrollment policy and fidelity to it. The school might make an exception but then another unsuccessful applicant might take an action and the school would be exposed.
 

Erudite Caveman

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We can't demand that rules are put in place and adhered to, and then complain when they are. Culturally we seem to have a very hard time accepting that rules - whether laws or lesser regulations - aren't something that are fuzzy around the edges. There is always an excuse offered and leniency or exception demanded. If we want to demand probity from everyone from politicians to travellers, then we have to accept that firm rules have hard edges, and that is a price worth paying.
 

Truth.ie

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"We'll face a lot of costs.....he'll need a new 700 euro Ipad".
Huh??
 

GrainneDee

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I don't see how letting him become a pupil at the school would displace another pupil.

I believe that the ASTI's inflexibility on the maximum number of pupils that each of its members can teach is a serious issue. I doubt that letting in one more child would inconvenience teachers at that school.
Pupil teacher ratios are important, and the teachers are right to insist on it. If you give in to one student, you have to give in to another and another and another, and you're back to unmanageable numbers.

This is a particularly tough one, though.

Is there only one secondary school in Portlaoise?
 
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Schools have to stick rigidly to their enrollment policy or they will leave themselves open to action by unsuccessful applicants. While they might want to make ad hoc exceptions in the kind of circumstances detailed in the OP, the appeals board that would oversee this will not take this into account but will simply look at the enrollment policy and fidelity to it. The school might make an exception but then another unsuccessful applicant might take an action and the school would be exposed.
Indeed. What you post seems harsh, but there are other kids involved too. They have rights if they went through the process. It's a very sad case but what can be done?
 

making waves

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I believe that the ASTI's inflexibility on the maximum number of pupils that each of its members can teach is a serious issue. I doubt that letting in one more child would inconvenience teachers at that school.
It's all the fault of those pesky selfish teachers :roll:

Nothing about the fact that government austerity has resulted in a crisis in education - including significant cuts in pay for teachers (especially newly qualified teachers). While at the same time the government facilitate Apple in avoiding paying €13billion in tax (a very small proportion would ensure that there were enough school places for every student in the country).
 

Eire1976

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Surely all the headmasters will be rushing to offer him a place.

If not, why not?
 

Erudite Caveman

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It's all the fault of those pesky selfish teachers :roll:

Nothing about the fact that government austerity has resulted in a crisis in education - including significant cuts in pay for teachers (especially newly qualified teachers). While at the same time the government facilitate Apple in avoiding paying €13billion in tax (a very small proportion would ensure that there were enough school places for every student in the country).
Nice job shoe-horning Apple into a thread about a dead sister and a school enrollment. Surely there was scope for some random association with 'Banksters' or 'vulture capitalists' for the win?
 
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Many of us routinely say "no" in our professional lives - and very often with good reason. The teacher/pupil ratio shouldn't be submitted to mission creep. It dilutes the attention and the efforts which teachers make, potentially leading to a reduction in outcome for several children.

In my line I at least have the opportunity to weigh off demands, prioritising some against others and adjusting delivery dates for existing commitments if higher pririty issues arise. There would not appear to be that degree of flexibility in teaching.
 

sadmal

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It's all the fault of those pesky selfish teachers :roll:

Nothing about the fact that government austerity has resulted in a crisis in education - including significant cuts in pay for teachers (especially newly qualified teachers). While at the same time the government facilitate Apple in avoiding paying €13billion in tax (a very small proportion would ensure that there were enough school places for every student in the country).
What is a Socialist doing supporting the middle classes? The ASTI like the TUI and the INTO are more than capable of defending their rights and will take any measure including strike action during Leaving Cert exams if they feel the need and to hell with the rights of pupils or students.
 

Half Nelson

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Many of us routinely say "no" in our professional lives - and very often with good reason. The teacher/pupil ratio shouldn't be submitted to mission creep. It dilutes the attention and the efforts which teachers make, potentially leading to a reduction in outcome for several children.

In my line I at least have the opportunity to weigh off demands, prioritising some against others and adjusting delivery dates for existing commitments if higher pririty issues arise. There would not appear to be that degree of flexibility in teaching.
Gosh Des... you're so...so....busy!
 

The Field Marshal

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Thread should be continued
There is nothing on RTE about this case .
But a somewhat similiar situation occurred in Dublin where a boy has now been offered a place after an initial refusal .
 
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Thread should be shut down.
According to RTE the boy has now been offered a place.
Is that the same case? According to the piece on RTE it concerns a Dubln school. The case referenced in the OP concerns a school in Porlaoise.
 

GDPR

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Probably because the school is over run with immigrants. Irish people are really suffering because of this mass immigration madness.
 

asset test

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There is another issue going on kind of related. A traveller child refused a place in a school in Ballyfermot.

Similar issue, places full, but he got a place. Delighted for the family who value education for their child.

School to admit Traveller initially refused place - RTÉ News

The situation in Portlaoise is very sad. And honestly if it was any other reason other than the caring for a dying child (surely everything else is off the menu while that is going on), I would agree with the school re late application.

I don't know the full details, but I would hope that in a Catholic/Christian school (or any school for that matter), that humanity would prevail.

Let's hope so. If it doesn't, there may possibly be more to the story. Who knows.
 

The Field Marshal

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Is that the same case? According to the piece on RTE it concerns a Dubln school. The case referenced in the OP concerns a school in Porlaoise.
Thank you Des and apologies to all other posters.
I mistakenly thought it referred to the OPs thread

I will amend my post accordingly.
 

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