Breaking... Who Pressured The Irish Times To Make * Revisions * Herein To Justice Sean Ryan's Inconvenient Truth?

StarryPlough01

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StarryPlough01's breaking news about The Irish Times self censorship




DISAPPEARING TEXT FROM ORIGINAL ARTICLE ~ 'JUSTICE SEAN RYAN ON THE REPORT OF THE COMMISSION TO INQUIRE INTO CHILD ABUSE' ~ BY PATSY MCGARRY



Original





The three Top Judges (Number 1, 2 & 3 in the Courts) were all Christian Brothers boys according to Justice Sean Ryan (Ryan Commission):



STARRY:

I also want to know if money was siphoned from well funded Industrial Schools run by the Christian Brothers to school children from middle-class families who attended Christian Brother schools such as Drimnagh Castle Secondary School (one of Drimnagh's former distinguished students is Chief Justice Frank Clarke), and 
O’Connell Christian Brothers School (two of their former students are Justice Sean Ryan then President of Court of Appeal and Justice Peter Kelly President of High Court)?

Justice Sean Ryan stated in the original article they were the highest three Judges ~ 'Number 1, 2 & 3 in the Courts' ^^^



A snippet

Patsy McGarry asks Justice Seán Ryan :


Q. Where were you at school?

A. O’Connell’s [Christian Brothers school in Dublin].



GUESS WHAT JUSTICE SEAN RYAN'S COMPREHENSIVE REPLY HAS BEEN EDITED FROM ORIGINAL ARTICLE. BELOW IS WHAT HE STATED:



Justice Seán Ryan


"On the Christian Brothers issue, when Peter Kelly became president of the High Court, Frank Clarke was Chief Justice, I was president of the Court of Appeal. So number 1, 2, and 3 [in the Courts] were all Christian Brothers boys… Peter Kelly and I were O’Connell’s boys, but Frank was Drimnagh Castle. When I came to the Bar there was nobody from the Christian Brothers anywhere near that…

"The Christian Brothers’ commitment to education was tremendous, in my view. I am a huge admirer of their work in education. But that didn’t apply in industrial schools. Here was an opportunity to give kids who had no other chance. It was a way of giving their young members a real opportunity to teach, to make something extraordinary out of this. That surprised me, I have to say. Leave aside being shocked or anything else I would have thought with such a commitment the primary focus being on incarceration was strange…


References:





THE DISTRICT JUDGES INCARCERATED THE BOYS IN THE INFAMOUS REFORMATORIES FOR SMALL THINGS, RANGING FROM TRUANCY, OR WHATEVER, RANGING FROM THAT TO POVERTY



Justice Seán Ryan



'When you looked at the things the boys were incarcerated for, they were small things, or they were not attending school, or whatever. Ranging from that to poverty'


BELOW ARE IMPORTANT PUBLIC INTEREST MARKED REVISIONS FROM PATSY MCGARRY'S ORIGINAL PUBLISHED ARTICLE ~~~


Justice Seán Ryan


'When you looked at the things the boys were incarcerated for, they were small things, or they were not attending school, or whatever. Ranging from that to poverty'


Justice Seán Ryan

When Fr Moore was sent out… sent in [Archbishop of Dublin] McQauid as a young priest [to prepare a report on Artane[. He was convicted himself afterwards. He was there giving evidence and had written a brilliant report which was the cause of a big battle in the Department

He described one episode/dispute…he turned around and found that a Christian Brother had grabbed a wrongdoer and dragged him into a room. Moore was counting the slaps. I think he got to a dozen – for some quite minor thing – before his attention was distracted by something else. So he couldn’t actually say how many [slaps] they thing ended up with…Wild West, I thought.



Q. Daingean [reformatory in Co Offaly] was another brutal institution…?


Justice Seán Ryan

A. Shocking, shocking. I mean utterly. That was, this is where a lot of people who were later notorious criminals came out of [The General, being one]. Frankly, no surprise. The conditions and the way they were treated were truly shocking and there was an episode where the resident manager was... he described how this was happening within earshot. It was truly awful. Kids were lined up in a big old barrack of a building at the bottom of a stair well and they had nightshirts on or were completely naked for the purpose of being beaten by two Brothers and the screams, of course, in waves went all over the place

The details of the physical abuse in Daingean was quite shocking and the terror of the place. In the Christian Brothers’ institutions, one of the problems was that nobody was there long enough to actually become knowledgeable and experienced about it and pass it on to anybody else. In Daingean [run by the Oblates] the problem was the opposite, they couldn’t get out of it. So a person was there, and was there for life, more or less, as far as I can recall.

There were some people, some members of the congregation who were quite candid about the way things went and there were records. All I can say is that the physical abuse in Daingean was quite shocking...


Q. In evidence the Oblates [who ran Daingean] too were very defensive…?



Justice Seán Ryan


A. I think the Oblates said that they would make no apology.The Christian Brothers and they had one thing in common. They said [to the Commission] ‘it’s your job to find out what happened’, in effect. I think the Christian Brothers may have said it in those words.

The Christian Brothers had apologised, but to anybody who knows anything about words it was obvious that it was written by a lawyer and it was designed to say – you could say it about the people of Lithuania– that, in so far as I have done anything to injure them I apologise deeply and profoundly for it. It was calculated to say nothing. We [the Commission] did a bit of analysis on it


The orders


Q. Then there were the female congregations, with the Sisters of Mercy running the largest number of institutions. They apologised, then rowed back, then apologised again…?



Justice Seán Ryan


A. I think it very much depended on who was in the driving seat.


Q. Was there any marked difference between co-operation of male and female congregations with the Commission?


Justice Seán Ryan



A. You have to draw a distinction between the official congregational posture and individual people, and it was often quite surprising what even the apparently toughest people would [say]. In some respects it appeared to me the individual religious – I’m not sure you could say [it] – welcomed the Commission but were quite satisfied to talk with a reasonable degree of candour. Obviously it wasn’t easy for them, and in some instances they were there with the Superiors from their own order in attendance and there were some differences

Sometimes they were pretty candid. The Christian Brothers tended to be more defensive. Some of the nuns were defensive, others were more prepared to acknowledge the faults to the system. They had reflected on it.

The Sisters of Mercy, in fairness to them, I think after Dear Daughter [documentary about abuse by Sisters of Mercy at Goldenbridge orphanage in Dublin, broadcast on RT É in 1996] they got a person to do an investigation to inform them as to what position they should take re the Commission, and they made all this available. Whoever it was spoke to Christine Buckley and Bernadette Fahy [who had been in Goldenbridge as children and featured in Dear Daughter] and some of the other people and then went and put these things to Sr Xaviera [senior nun at Goldenbridge] … and she came out very badly out of the programmes



Justice Seán Ryan

It was a fairly frank and very damning report in which he said something like ‘anything could have happened here..’. Sr Xaviera described Sr B [another nun] as a psychopath… They [Sisters] weren’t very comfortable with it [the report] and wanted to retreat from it... they had complied with their legal obligations re discovery



Q. Did the late Sr Xaviera give evidence?


Justice Seán Ryan


A. She did and she was very candid. Obviously there were things she didn’t agree with. There was the stuff about making rosary beads and that could be very cruel because some girls, like some boys, would be naturally adroit and dexterous and others would be clumsy about this. And there’s not much use beating me if I’m not able to do it and keep up my quota

For some people it could have been, at certain times of the day, of occupational use but the tyranny with which it was imposed meant that was impossible. When people were to be punished they were often told to wait on the landing, cold and miserable in your nightwear, and Sr Xaviera mightn’t come up until 11 or midnight and you were waiting there wondering what was going happen, knowing it was not going to be nice, not knowing how bad was going to be

Somewhat to my surprise there was no dispute [by the nuns] about that.

One of the things I was just curious about was who was the most savage person, who was the person against whom most complaints were made and it turned out to be a Brother in Artane named in, I think, over 80 complaints.



Justice Seán Ryan

'I left school in 1966. There was an awareness, there was a consciousness, but there was no idea... there was the story of the few bad apples and that sort of thing'



2/Continues below...
 


StarryPlough01

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2/Continues...



FOR CONTEXT:

Justice Seán Ryan


…. Then he writes his report and said ‘I’m not very convinced about this from Br X. I think we have a problem here’.

He’s quite candid about his thoughts and so on. As I say, very unusual. So they shift him and a whole succession of events now takes place and the guy ends up many years later after a career that we get episodically, having what he’s pleased to call an affair with a boy.



BELOW IS EDITED OUT OF ARTICLE):


Justice Seán Ryan


He’s now teaching in a secondary school in the West.



FOR CONTEXT:

Justice Seán Ryan


…. Everywhere you went with this story … it was very complicated to get the story down, and what it showed was that the man had abused left, right and centre, all over maybe a career of 40 years, and these are only the bits we knew about, and it progressed from one level up to actually his having an affair with a boy. The Brothers didn’t tell the parents this was the story. They pretended they were investigating.



Justice Seán Ryan

'One of the issues we looked at was what’s the story with the money, and it’s clear that the State was providing a lot of money to the institutions'



Q. Where were you at school?


Justice Seán Ryan


A. O’Connell’s [Christian Brothers school in Dublin].

On the Christian Brothers issue, when became president of the High Court, was Chief Justice, I was president of the Court of Appeal. So number 1, 2, and 3 [in the Courts] were all Christian Brothers boys… Peter Kelly and I were O’Connell’s boys, but Frank was Castle. When I came to the Bar there was nobody from the Christian Brothers anywhere near that


References:







REVISED ARTICLE BY PATSY MCGARRY BELOW:

Justice Seán Ryan on the report of the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse

Patsy McGarry

May 18, 2019

*33 min read* [the original article stated it was a *34 min read *]





I'm asking you to compare and contrast the below two links (Original and Revised); and draw your own conclusions about The Irish Times self censorship ~~~


Original



Revised

 

StarryPlough01

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I started this thread because I was gobsmacked to see how much of this story had been gutted after its first publication.





 

StarryPlough01

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'Anybody awkward was put somewhere. Ireland was closed, defensive, xenophobic'

Ten years ago, Seán Ryan’s definitive report shed light on some of Ireland’s darkest secrets



Sat, May 18, 2019, 06:00


Patsy McGarry



image.jpg


One of the things that stuck Mr Justice Seán Ryan’s mind during the years when the commission heard evidence was the extraordinary number of people held in institutions over those decades in Ireland. Photograph: Crispin Rodwell/The Irish Times



Justice Seán Ryan:



“When the State was founded, 1922, you removed one element, namely the British influence, that was not in thrall to the church and the vacuum was filled by the church,” says Ryan.

“My sense is that the Catholic Church, and it’s easy to blame the Catholic Church for everything, my sense is that [their] attitude was, “this is our responsibility, we own this, butt out. But in a sense the State is us because the civil servants are all sorts of Catholic Christian Brothers’ boys, everything else and so on. And the bishop. The politicians are scared out of their wits. Nobody is going to challenge the church and the church owns the system.”


In Britain all such big institutions for children were replaced with smaller homes in the 1920s.


Then, of course, there were “psychiatric institutions. I mean anybody awkward was put somewhere.” Ireland was “closed, defensive, nationalistic, xenophobic”. There was “Radio Éireann, that was it. ….
 

StarryPlough01

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Patsy McGarry must speak out and demand to know the reason why his article was pulled and whitewashed.



There's evidence in the strike-through. For example, Brother X is teaching in a secondary school in the West.



Justice Seán Ryan:

…. Then he writes his report and said ‘I’m not very convinced about this from Br X. I think we have a problem here’.



He’s quite candid about his thoughts and so on. As I say, very unusual. So they shift him and a whole succession of events now takes place and the guy ends up many years later after a career that we get episodically, having what he’s pleased to call an affair with a boy.



BELOW IS EDITED OUT OF ARTICLE):


Justice Seán Ryan:

He’s now teaching in a secondary school in the West.



FOR CONTEXT:


Justice Seán Ryan:


…. Everywhere you went with this story … it was very complicated to get the story down, and what it showed was that the man had abused left, right and centre, all over maybe a career of 40 years, and these are only the bits we knew about, and it progressed from one level up to actually his having an affair with a boy. The Brothers didn’t tell the parents this was the story. They pretended they were investigating.


And


Justice Seán Ryan:

'One of the issues we looked at was what’s the story with the money, and it’s clear that the State was providing a lot of money to the institutions'
 

StarryPlough01

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soubresauts

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Thanks for informing us, Starry, but why don't you give us a short summary of your opinion about the article and its versions?
 

fifilawe

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is that guy a Doppelganger for Mitch McConnell the GOP spokesman in the US Congress?
 

StarryPlough01

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Thanks for informing us, Starry, but why don't you give us a short summary of your opinion about the article and its versions?

I'm not interested in editorialising. I simply want the truth to come out about power politics being played out in the dark in Ireland.

Did you notice about the Christian Brother who had an affair with a boy? He is still teaching at a secondary school in the West.
 

StarryPlough01

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The Ryan Report (published 20 May 2009 )10 Years on...


"endemic abuse was sustained by the Catholic Church through the silencing of allegations of abuse, the transfer of abusers, and a reliance on physical and emotional punishment of children".
Conall O'Fatharta

"The failure to publicly identify alleged abusers, due to legal challenge by the religious orders ...."
Conall O'Fatharta



By Conall O'Fatharta


It was scathing in its assessment of the Department of Education which it said had a “deferential and submissive attitude” towards the congregations that ran the institutions.

This compromised its ability to carry out its duty of inspecting and monitoring the institutions in question.


Historian of child welfare, childhood, youth and gender in Ireland Dr Sarah Anne Buckley looks at Legacy of Ryan Report:



… the report offers much when looking at class, gender, power, welfare and the treatment of generations of vulnerable groups of Irish children but noted that “the gaps are also stark”.

“Children from the Travelling community, children nursed out, thorough investigation of the foster care arrangements from the schools, the list goes on,” she said.

… the report had arguably “grossly underestimated” the role of the ISPCC/NSPCC in the transferral of children to industrial schools.


Dr Sarah Anne Buckley is concerned about government's plan to seal for 75 years the records of the Commission, the Residential Institutions Redress Board, and Residential Institutions Redress Review Committee:


[Dr Sarah Anne Buckley] “What is of utmost concern to survivors, academics and activists today is what will happen this archive, where will it be placed, when will it be made accessible and will consultation occur. Historical justice is central to this conversation and I believe the role for historians and archivists remains critical today and in the future,” ....


Conall O'Fatharta continues...

"The failure to hold public hearings is often framed in terms of confidentiality, concern for vulnerable persons, and the potential defamatory nature of allegations made against alleged perpetrators and institutions.

"None of these concerns are unique to historical abuse inquiries or to Ireland: Canada, Australia and the United Kingdom have all managed public hearings into historical abuse despite similar concerns.




Well Done Conall O'Fatharta!
 

StarryPlough01

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WHY is The Irish Times not being transparent about the post publication revisions being made to "Justice Seán Ryan on the report of the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse" article by Patsy McGarry"



WHY didn't The Irish Times simply publish a full transcript of the interview with Justice Sean Ryan?
 

Andrew49

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AndrewSB49
I was placed out On Licence to work for a Religious Order running a Boarding School. Most of the food was grown & harvested in an Industrial School also run by the same Religious Order.

It was a 13-hour shift of work and the 'wage' was kept by the Religious Order in lieu of Parental Monies debt. There were 5 other children from the Institutions working at this Boarding School.

Despite being an 'employee" we were also subject to physical punishment.
 

StarryPlough01

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I was placed out On Licence to work for a Religious Order running a Boarding School. Most of the food was grown & harvested in an Industrial School also run by the same Religious Order.

It was a 13-hour shift of work and the 'wage' was kept by the Religious Order in lieu of Parental Monies debt. There were 5 other children from the Institutions working at this Boarding School.

Despite being an 'employee" we were also subject to physical punishment.

Andrew,


You are one of the brightest people I know on this forum.


You were being taught to know your betters, and servile place in Irish society. You were not valued like the middle-class children you served. :-( You must live down to expectations ~ serfdom/labourer. You were treated like garbage.

This is something that I've said to the Magdalene women: Don't live down to expectations.

The religious orders were siphoning money intended for your upkeep to middle-class children at their secondary schools... People like the 3 highest judges in the courts, Number 1, 2 & 3 in Ireland, who attended Drimnagh Castle and O'Connell Secondary Schools... These children were being mentored to become part of the ruling elite. You would have stood out as an intelligent student, but you were NOT given the same opportunities to excel, say, as those children at Drimnagh Castle and O'Connell run by Christian Brothers.



REVISION


Justice Sean Ryan:



'One of the issues we looked at was what’s the story with the money, and it’s clear that the State was providing a lot of money to the institutions'




______

Anecdote: When I first started posting on p.ie robust Teacher Unionist threads (they wanted a raise during austerity), one teacher snidely said a couple of times to me: "You should know your betters." How does he treat the school children entrusted to his care, I wonder?
 

StarryPlough01

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THE MEDIA PERCEIVED THAT CHILDREN OF THE POOR IN INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS WEREN'T * WORTHY * OF PROTECTION FROM SEXUAL ABUSE AND VIOLENCE...

THUS, THEY REMAINED SILENT



Brian Quinn, former journalist and editor of the Evening Herald between 1969 and 1976 wrote a 'Letter to Editor' of The Irish Times on 11th May 1999




"The series [States of Fear] also prompted Brian Quinn, former journalist and editor of the Evening Herald between 1969 and 1976, to write an eloquent letter to The Irish Times in which he noted the failure of his generation of journalists to expose the abuse. He admitted that journalists of the 1940s and 1950s “had their suspicions of the industrial schools”.

"Having viewed States of Fear, Quinn now believed that journalists “should have tried harder to find out the real truth” but felt that, even if they had, they “would not have been believed and managements and editors would never have held out against a massed attack by the all-powerful Irish Catholic Church”.


The journalists of mid-20th-century Ireland were, he concluded, “trapped in a carefully designed plot that mixed lies with official evasion and ecclesiastical terror"



Ryan Report:



3.109 This lack of investigation and reporting may reflect the absence of interest in this subject by the public. As regards the personal attitude of journalists, a journalist who was the educational correspondent of one of the NATIONAL DAILIES in the 1960s recalls:

We saw educational issues as involving middle class concerns like curriculum development or Church and State, not ‘the lesser breeds without the Law’ in the Industrial Schools. After Kennedy, there was some improvement but we didn’t push as hard as we should have done.

The Ryan Report ~ Vol IV Chapter 3


^^^ Which national daily did this education correspondent work for? ^^^



Chapter 3
Society and the schools

By Prof. David Gwynn Morgan
Part 1 Social, economic and family background
Child poverty in independent Ireland



….

3.98 The result was that, up to the time of the Kennedy Report, as Dr Keating writes59:

[Apart from Michael Viney’s articles of 1966] the rest of the sparse coverage of the Schools was treated either with the nostalgic gloss of Patrick J McNulty’s article of 20-21 June, 1969 entitled Memories of Artane or as simple reportage devoid of analysis, despite opportunity for greater analysis as a result of conferences on the inadequacies and dangers of the system.

3.99 Serious cases of sexual or physical abuse were not reported, even if they came to light by way of a court case. Thus, for instance, a letter to The Irish Times on 11th May 1999, from a former reporter (and subsequently editor) of the Evening Herald, Brian Quinn, stated that in the 1950s the writer had: 60


witnessed one of the worst of the Christian Brothers break into the office of the manager and demand that a court case that mentioned Artane should not be used in the Evening Herald. Before the manager could lift a phone, the Manager would push open the editorial door to tell us the manager had instructed that the case be dumped.... Those requests should have alerted journalists to start inquiries into what was happening in Artane. That we did not is a heavy burden.


3.100 Significantly, the case referred to in this letter seems to have gone unreported also by the other newspapers. Likewise, when in January 1951, an attendant employed at Marlborough House (not an Industrial School, but a place of detention, run by the Department of Education) was convicted of sexually abusing two boys detained in the institution, there were no newspaper reports.

3.101 A Departmental report by Dr McCabe of 8th January, 1948 recorded that following the death of a child in Rathdrum, owing to careless supervision, Dr McCabe visited the school and sought to get a ‘callous’ resident manager to appreciate the gravity of what had occurred:

I drew her attention to the bad impression that would be likely to be created regarding the conduct of affairs in her school on anybody who would read the inquest proceedings in the newspapers. She told me that the matter had been taken care of in Carysfort and that there would be no report in the press.

3.102 Even if a skeleton made its way out of its cupboard, the newspapers could be persuaded to turn their back. An example from as late as 1964 was a story about head-shaving in the Connacht Tribune, which was picked up by the British Sunday paper, The People; but no Irish national paper reported the story.

3.103 The second omission was even more serious. With very few exceptions, there was no comprehensive survey of the School system and no accounts of the every-day experiences of the residents in the Schools. Specifically, so far as any serious discussion of the School system goes, in the 1940s and 1950s, only two contributions in daily papers have been found. Each was a multi-part feature in The Irish Times (referred to below).

3.104 The Kennedy Committee Report, while it attracted more attention than any other single episode, was not front page news. Even the significant Doyle Supreme Court constitutional case 61 received little coverage outside the The Irish Times of 13th October 1956.

3.105 A series of four articles appeared anonymously (‘By a Special Correspondent’) in The Irish Times in February, 1950. The author appeared to have been well-informed about the system and aware of the history of the institutions and of developments in the State and elsewhere. The series was very critical of the system and proposed radical changes to do away with institutions. The writer expressed limited approval of the Cussen Commission, which did valuable work but failed ‘to see that something more revolutionary than improvements in the existing structure was necessary’. There was little reaction to the articles, which seem to have gone largely unnoticed in official and political circles as well as among the general public.

3.106 The lack of interest generally is evident in a response by the Department of Education to a question from the Commission stating that it had found no records referring to The Irish Times articles on child delinquency in 1950. This is consistent with an expectation that there would be no interest in the matter among the electorate or public representatives. Otherwise, it would have been expected that cuttings would be kept and a defence dossier compiled.

3.107 Another breach in the iron curtain was the work of Michael Viney. He wrote a series of articles 62 in The Irish Times, based on six weeks’ research. Significantly, even this major series attracted only one (published) letter to the editor, 63 and it seems likely that given the expenditure of resources, the paper would have published any reasonable letters received. Likewise, the series was met by an eerie silence from other Irish newspapers, which declined the opportunity to mine the rich lode, which, it might seem, had been opened up by Mr Viney.

3.108 It should be noted that in the 1960s, the rare journalists who wished to do so, like Michael Viney and another journalist, Joseph O’Malley (who wrote a single article in The Irish Independent) were not discouraged by the Minister (George Colley) from visiting and inspecting the Schools subject to the fact that the particular schools permission would have to be obtained. And in fact, the Schools facilitated their visits.

3.109 This lack of investigation and reporting may reflect the absence of interest in this subject by the public. As regards the personal attitude of journalists, a journalist who was the educational correspondent of one of the NATIONAL DAILIES in the 1960s recalls:

We saw educational issues as involving middle class concerns like curriculum development or Church and State, not ‘the lesser breeds without the Law’ in the Industrial Schools. After Kennedy, there was some improvement but we didn’t push as hard as we should have done.
 

StarryPlough01

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Spin...



According to the official history of the Christian Brothers order (
A Christian Brother (1926), pp 524-5):

This was a congregation which stood apart as a body of men committed to the education of boys, especially poor boys; which before independence, had stayed outside the National System for ideological reasons; which asserted its independence from each local bishop; and which, most significantly, was the principal provider of secondary education for the Nineteenth and most of the Twentieth Century.

 

StarryPlough01

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Irish Examiner


Sealing child abuse records is 'dangerous'



examiner-12.jpg


By Conall O'Fatharta



Sealing child abuse records is ‘dangerous'




By Conall Ó Fátharta


Legislation to seal millions of child abuse records for 75 years was drafted so “all possible provisions” of the National Archives Act, which allows the public or State bodies to access records, would be disapplied
.

The Retention of Records Bill 2019 will see records from the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse (CICA), the Residential Institutions Redress Board, and the Residential Institutions Redress Review Committee placed in the National Archives of Ireland and sealed for a minimum of 75 years, in what has been labelled “a dangerous and unnecessary precedent”.

Documents released under the Freedom of Information Act reveal that the National Archives of Ireland (NAI) advised the department, in April 2018, that there was no need for the legislation.

It said that records from the CICA are already covered by the National Archives Act, 1986, and that the latter two bodies could be brought under its remit by simply adding them to the schedule of the act.

This would mean the records would be open to inspection after 30 years, subject to some exemptions.


Former head of special projects at the NAI, Caitríona Crowe:


The provisions of the National Archives Act have proved perfectly adequate, over more than 30 years, to protect privacy and deal with sensitive subject matter,” ....



The department’s action opens the gate for future restricted access to any records the State may not wish citizens to see.”
 

StarryPlough01

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(35) A capitation grant is one given to the religious orders by the State on a "per child, per week" basis at the predetermined amount. Thus, in 1958, each industrial school received forty-five shillings (45/-) from the State and Local Authority per child, per week.

In most cases, this grant [45/- per week for each child] was paid only for children between the ages of six and sixteen years. See Eire, Reformatory and Industrial Schools (Average Cost of Maintenance of Youthful Offenders and Children) Order, 1958 (Dublin:The Stationery Office, 1958)



Starry:

We heard Andrew49 say the produce for the middle-class boarding school children (who were being groomed to be part of the ruling elite) was grown & harvested in an Industrial School also run by the same Religious Order. Andrew was put out to work 'on licence' for no wage.

While the middle-class kids ate the fresh produce harvested from the industrial school, institutional kids like Andrew49 were starved and poorly clothed.



Harrowing reading [Ryan Report] below ~~

Chapter 3 St Joseph’s Industrial School, Ferryhouse, Clonmel, (‘Ferryhouse’),1885–1999




Neglect and emotional abuse

16. Living conditions in both schools were poor, unhygienic, inadequate and often overcrowded.

17. Boys were hungry and poorly clothed in circumstances where funding was sufficient to provide these basic needs.

18. Education and aftercare were deficient.


19. Family contact was not encouraged or maintained.

20. As their submission to the Cussen Commission reveals, the Rosminians knew the detrimental consequences of the industrial school system, but did nothing to ameliorate them. They could have changed the regime, but they did nothing until the1970s.




Conclusions on neglect and emotional abuse

1 Ferryhouse was a large institution and would have received adequate funding to provide a reasonable level of care for the children for most of the relevant period. In addition, it operated a farm and had trades such as tailoring and boot-making that provided for the needs of the boys
.

2 The boys were poorly fed. For much of the period, the food was of insufficient quantity and quality.

3 Poor hygiene and overcrowding were serious problems in the School, and these conditions placed the health and well-being of the boys in danger.

4 The boys were poorly clothed and looked different from children outside the Institution.

5 The accommodation was unsuitable, unhygienic and badly maintained.


6 Family contact was not encouraged or maintained. Boys became cut off from their families and friends.

7 The aftercare was minimal and often non-existent. Young teenagers unprepared forthe outside world were thrown into it andepared forthe outside world were thrown into it and




#1121


Andrew49
Run once and when caught you got an unmerciful beating - to continue to run and you became a target for all kinds of violence. There were stories around Ferryhouse in my time of two bodies of children somewhere in the hills and woods around Ferryhouse. Apparently they ran away and headed into the forest and got lost. According to the Kennedy Report (1970) over 230 children absconded from the Institutions and were never seen again - not by their families or the religious or state authorities. Many of the Institutions were in very remote places ... Ferryhouse was/is two miles from Clonmel and any boy seen on that road was reported by the locals. So using that road to run was out of the question - especially during the day. It didn't stop us at night though and one night we organised a raid on a Clonmel Bakery. Twenty of us went through the fields and up the banks of the River Suir into town and waited for the Bakery to fill the Bread Vans ... we emptied one of them [Loaves, buns, cakes) and took ourselves back to the dorms and had a feast.

Just sharing this to emphasise that we did resist them in our own way.
 

StarryPlough01

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Original (unedited) article




Justice Sean Ryan speaking but below has been REVISED post publication ~~~


When Fr Moore was sent out… sent in [Archbishop of Dublin] McQauid as a young priest [to prepare a report on Artane[. He was convicted himself afterwards. He was there giving evidence and had written a brilliant report which was the cause of a big battle in the Department

He described one episode/dispute…he turned around and found that a Christian Brother had grabbed a wrongdoer and dragged him into a room. Moore was counting the slaps. I think he got to a dozen – for some quite minor thing – before his attention was distracted by something else. So he couldn’t actually say how many [slaps] they thing ended up with…Wild West, I thought.



…………………………….


Background: Fr Harry Moore - Moore was mentioned by Justice Sean Ryan, BUT this piece was edited by The Irish Times in post publication




CHAPTER 26 - FR HARRY MOOORE


Commission of Investigation
Report into the Catholic Archdiocese of Dublin

July 2009; released November 26, 2009



In keeping with its terms of reference, the Murphy report discussed a "representative sample" of 46 priests, selected from the 172 named priests about whom the Commission received information. The report on the 46 priests, however, was not released intact.



Priest’s history


26.3 At the time of this complaint Fr Harry Moore was a curate in Glasthule parish and the alleged assault was said to have taken place in the presbytery. Fr Moore was born in 1936 and was ordained in 1960. His first appointment was as chaplain to Artane Industrial School from 1960 -1967. During his time there he compiled a report at the request of Archbishop McQuaid on the conditions under which the boys lived in Artane. This report was handed over by the current Archbishop of Dublin to the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse.87


26.4 His next appointment after Artane was as a curate in Ringsend parish until 1975. He was then sent to Kilquade parish for one year. He asked to be reassigned because of loneliness and he was given a position as assistant priest in a Catholic youth organisation.

….


26.7 He underwent various psychiatric and personality tests while in the hospital. The doctor noted that he had real concerns about Fr Moore‟s sexual functioning as he had “difficulty in satisfying his strong affectionate needs because of his inability to establish mature adult relationships”. His was described as a personality with “a very strong element of psychopathy and hysteria”. He recommended Fr Moore for team-based occupations if supervised correctly, but he did not recommend him for parish work.


26.8 Despite this medical report, Archbishop Ryan returned Fr Moore to active parish ministry, appointing him a curate in Edenmore parish in November 1977.



Fr Moore's problems [psychosexual immaturity] escalate … Keep reading….



26.33 The charges were reduced to four and in July 2004, Fr Moore pleaded guilty to two charges of indecent assault and two charges of buggery while a curate in Bayside. Sentencing eventually took place in May 2005 and on that date he was sentenced to seven years in respect of each of the buggery charges and three years in respect of each of the sexual assault charges. These sentences were suspended for a period of ten years and he was put under the supervision of the probation services. He was also ordered to abide by the provisions of the Sex Offenders Act 2001. This is generally described as „being placed on the sex offenders‟ register‟ –see Appendix 2.


26.34 While awaiting trial it was reported to Bishop Murray (who was no longer an auxiliary bishop of Dublin) in 2002 that Fr Moore had resumed giving school retreats. Fr Moore told the Commission that this was untrue. Bishop Murray informed the Archdiocese of this report.



26.35 In 2004, the Archdiocese notified the health board about the complaints. Social workers from the area where Fr Moore lived met him to discuss the advisability of refraining from contact with children. This information was not produced in the initial HSE discovery (see Chapter 6) and was brought to the Commission‟s attention only after the HSE received the draft of this chapter.




Chapter 26 Fr Harry Moore




Ryan Report

Archbishop Ryan


1.38 Archbishop Ryan failed to properly investigate complaints, among others, against Fr McNamee, Fr Maguire, Fr Ioannes*, ,Fr Septimus* and Fr Carney. He also ignored the advice given by a psychiatrist in the case of FR MOORE that he should not be placed in a parish setting. FR MOORE was subsequently convicted of a serious sexual assault on a young teenager while working as a parish curate.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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concerns about Fr Moore‟s sexual functioning as he had “difficulty in satisfying his strong affectionate needs because of his inability to establish mature adult relationships”. His was described as a personality with “a very strong element of psychopathy and hysteria”.
Interesting snippet there Starry. I've been watching in particular for psychological reports on these predators as I noticed in such reports commissioned by the Conference of Bishops in the States that there were striking similarities in their psychological make up. Extreme narcissism was one standout, and an 'arrested adolescence' was noticeable among the opinions given by the psychologists.

The US Conference of Bishops got cold feet very quickly on having such clerics undergo psychological evaluation - when they realise similarities were emerging in a number of cases.
 


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