BREXIT difficulties = Ireland's opportumity

statsman

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In Dublin yes but didn't the last census show vacancy rates in some parts of Ireland in double digits?
Cavan, Kerry, Monaghan, Leitrim, Roscommon, Mayo, Donegal, Sligo, Connemara; can you see Airbus attracting the numbers and kinds of workers they need to those areas? How would schools, shops, hospitals, and so on cope?
 


statsman

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Sure, but they can be resolved. Now's actually the time for the govt to be aggressive on things like seizure of land for housing and streamlining approvals for building. There is an opportunity to get British jobs here, along with skilled, tax paying labour as well. We should go for it.

Not everyone can work for Facebook or a bank.

Also: In the interests of helping along the North's future issues with certification of products: Ireland in its largess could offer to certify them here in the Republic and create a cottage industry. Could be a way of fudging EASA requirements.
We can't build the houses we need; how do you expect us the build the houses we'd like to have?
 

silverharp

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I do believe reaching a population sweet spot is an objective that makes sense.
Having a couple of million extra people allows for economies of scale and makes infrastructure like public transit viable.
The UK has too many people on their island and that will be a problem for them.
We have too few and it is a problem for us.
and another generation of kids who will have to pay absurd rental rates and silly house prices. Then it also depends on the quality of the people, if they are mostly European no integration issues however I'm sure Merkel would get a boner at the idea of Ireland helping to solve the little snafu she got Europe into.
 

firefly123

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and another generation of kids who will have to pay absurd rental rates and silly house prices. Then it also depends on the quality of the people, if they are mostly European no integration issues however I'm sure Merkel would get a boner at the idea of Ireland helping to solve the little snafu she got Europe into.
I never stated I wanted ireland to be a refugee camp.
I'm saying we try and lure some industry from the UK so they can remain within the EU supply chain. As the only English speaking eu nation it eould make the transition easier .
I'd fully expect many UK workers would look to come over here and settle. I doubt it's going to be huddled masses coming over on dingys although I do feel we should take some of those in until a proper system is put in place stopping this madness. The current system only encourages such risky action.

Let's just say we get Airbus to build wings in Shannon.
It's workers could settle in limerick, Clare, Galway, Roscommon, Kerry, Tipperary etc. We now happily have a motorway infrastructure allowing for that thanks to investment previously (much from the dastardly EU)

Shannon airport is under utilised. Foynes is available. Its not a dirty industry. There's plenty of greenfield sites that would be used.
Jaguar had moved it's R&D to shannon. It could be a western hub full of high quality jobs and the ancillary support work would be huge for the West.

Silly house prices is down to planning stupidity and gombeenism.
 

hollandia

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Cavan, Kerry, Monaghan, Leitrim, Roscommon, Mayo, Donegal, Sligo, Connemara; can you see Airbus attracting the numbers and kinds of workers they need to those areas? How would schools, shops, hospitals, and so on cope?
In fairness, the vacancy rates are largely due to the lack of job opportunities in those areas. We need a managed process of decentralisation away from Dublin. Sticking industry in these areas without the necessary infrastructure is a recipe for disaster. As is bunging Dublin full of jobs so everyone has to either move there, rent midweek or commute 3 hours a day.

But management of the process is key.
 

statsman

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I never stated I wanted ireland to be a refugee camp.
I'm saying we try and lure some industry from the UK so they can remain within the EU supply chain. As the only English speaking eu nation it eould make the transition easier .
I'd fully expect many UK workers would look to come over here and settle. I doubt it's going to be huddled masses coming over on dingys although I do feel we should take some of those in until a proper system is put in place stopping this madness. The current system only encourages such risky action.

Let's just say we get Airbus to build wings in Shannon.
It's workers could settle in limerick, Clare, Galway, Roscommon, Kerry, Tipperary etc. We now happily have a motorway infrastructure allowing for that thanks to investment previously (much from the dastardly EU)

Shannon airport is under utilised. Foynes is available. Its not a dirty industry. There's plenty of greenfield sites that would be used.
Jaguar had moved it's R&D to shannon. It could be a western hub full of high quality jobs and the ancillary support work would be huge for the West.

Silly house prices is down to planning stupidity and gombeenism.
When was the last time you drove from Shannon to Roscommon?
 

PBP voter

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I never stated I wanted ireland to be a refugee camp.
I'm saying we try and lure some industry from the UK so they can remain within the EU supply chain. As the only English speaking eu nation it eould make the transition easier .
I'd fully expect many UK workers would look to come over here and settle. I doubt it's going to be huddled masses coming over on dingys although I do feel we should take some of those in until a proper system is put in place stopping this madness. The current system only encourages such risky action.

Let's just say we get Airbus to build wings in Shannon.
It's workers could settle in limerick, Clare, Galway, Roscommon, Kerry, Tipperary etc. We now happily have a motorway infrastructure allowing for that thanks to investment previously (much from the dastardly EU)

Shannon airport is under utilised. Foynes is available. Its not a dirty industry. There's plenty of greenfield sites that would be used.
Jaguar had moved it's R&D to shannon. It could be a western hub full of high quality jobs and the ancillary support work would be huge for the West.

Silly house prices is down to planning stupidity and gombeenism.
We are one of the least densely populated countries in Europe and we have insanely expensive housing costs.

Insanity when you think about it.

We could have cheap housing and invest in our pension,education,healthcare etc.

But it seems we don't want it.
 

Tribal

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I never stated I wanted ireland to be a refugee camp.
Unfortunately we end up being one for British economic refugees, which means we'd probably be importing British UKip voters too.

I don't think I'd ever get used to seeing houses around Ireland with English and British flags flying from them.
 

statsman

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In fairness, the vacancy rates are largely due to the lack of job opportunities in those areas. We need a managed process of decentralisation away from Dublin. Sticking industry in these areas without the necessary infrastructure is a recipe for disaster. As is bunging Dublin full of jobs so everyone has to either move there, rent midweek or commute 3 hours a day.

But management of the process is key.
Agreed.
 

onetimeonly

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Unfortunately we end up being one for British economic refugees, which means we'd probably be importing British UKip voters too.

I don't think I'd ever get used to seeing houses around Ireland with English and British flags flying from them.
Ah, you'd get used to it, under certain conditions at least. Say, hypothetically, Brexit accelerates a United Ireland. Seeing a few English and Polish/Nigerian flags during a World Cup wouldn't be any kind of a big deal.
 

Tribal

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Ah, you'd get used to it, under certain conditions at least. Say, hypothetically, Brexit accelerates a United Ireland. Seeing a few English and Polish/Nigerian flags during a World Cup wouldn't be any kind of a big deal.
When you put it like that it would just be normalising them as just another foreign nation rather than the belligerent antagonist they've been for us for centuries.

I do like that Irish is now becoming more visible compared to the past.
 

ScoobyDoo

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I do believe reaching a population sweet spot is an objective that makes sense.
Having a couple of million extra people allows for economies of scale and makes infrastructure like public transit viable.
The UK has too many people on their island and that will be a problem for them.
We have too few and it is a problem for us.


Could we try some kind of plantation of people from Britain into Ireland to sort out the imbalance?

Counties like Donegal, Cavan and Monaghan are badly in need of some more people.
 

GDPR

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Could we try some kind of plantation of people from Britain into Ireland to sort out the imbalance?

Counties like Donegal, Cavan and Monaghan are badly in need of some more people.
Er, like what happened two or three centuries ago? Nah. (I think you are being ironic here)

However, post brexit the people gathering at Calais may be gathering at Holyhead instead...
 

ScoobyDoo

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It would appear as if some large manufacturers/companies are threatening to pull out of Britain if Brexit goes ahead, BMW, Airbus to name just two. If this were to happen, should Ireland not be positioning itself to pick up any possible benefits of proposed re-location

Now I realise that there are risks in taking this approach, such as, becoming more heavily reliant of foreign investment, no limk to the European mainland and a lack of decent infrastructure. But, are we not missing an opportunity here if we don't even try to attract new business.

There has been some talk lately about where we should look at spending next year's €800 million remaining fiscal space, well, how about on some major infrastructure projects which are needed anyway. This is ibnvestment that won't go to waste.

Anyone have any thoughts on this?

The reason why investment in manufacturing is going down in UK is because manufacturers need to have certainty on the future arrangement between UK and EU. These manufacturers operate a just in time model so any delays at customs for parts etc will cause problems.

Ireland is in no way positioned geographically to operate in such a model efficiently. The business will go to the continent.
 

ScoobyDoo

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Er, like what happened two or three centuries ago? Nah. (I think you are being ironic here)

However, post brexit the people gathering at Calais may be gathering at Holyhead instead...

Net migration figures post Brexit vote are still the same a pre Brexit. Seems people are not too worried about Brexit?
 

GDPR

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The reason why investment in manufacturing is going down in UK is because manufacturers need to have certainty on the future arrangement between UK and EU. These manufacturers operate a just in time model so any delays at customs for parts etc will cause problems.

Ireland is in no way positioned geographically to operate in such a model efficiently. The business will go to the continent.
I agree. Ireland is unprepared for it in that its infrastructure simply cannot cope and it will take a decade or more to get that sorted. Also its health and insurance sectors may need to be restructured and made less expensive.
 

GDPR

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Net migration figures post Brexit vote are still the same a pre Brexit. Seems people are not too worried about Brexit?
They are wishfully thinking, imho, just like the builders keep building in London. And the people gathering at Holyhead may include native pommies.
 

ScoobyDoo

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They are wishfully thinking, imho, just like the builders keep building in London. And the people gathering at Holyhead may include native pommies.
Non pommies can just get on one of these new boat routes direct from the continent to Ireland you are talking about?
 


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