BREXIT: the general forum (Second Thread)

Betson

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Sync

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Boris Johnson has told government officials to explore the possibility of building a bridge between Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Documents seen by Channel 4 News reveal that both the Treasury and Department for Transport have been asked for advice on the costs and risks of such a project.

The prime minister wants to know “where this money could come from” and “the risks around the project” – which appear to include “WW2 munitions in the Irish Sea”.
I’m unclear on how this actually would help resolve the substantive objections of the DUP. But sure. Would work for us and be a useful gift for Scotland when they vote independence.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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Haven't they just delayed the last white elephant, the HS2 rail project on grounds of cost?

Not sure that spending billions on a BorisBridge instead will convert many to the cause...

Surely, as Rees-Moggy might say, there are some WWII pontoon bridges that could be utilised?

It would be alright as long as the weather is decent in the Irish sea, as it usually is:)
 

RasherHash

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EU BIRDCAGE - #BBC #News - #Corruption across EU 'breathtaking' - #EU #Commission... 🇪🇺
 

JacquesHughes

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Is Backstop back? Will Johnson throw the DUP under the bus?
Why not? He threw 21 Tory MPs under the bus.


If he does, he'll witness a strange phenomenon: he'll see a bugs-bunny style rise of the Party from the wreckage, unaffected and unhurt, for NI is the ToonTown of politics.

They have seen a British Prime Minister recalled from Brussels by a phone call, and the largest economies of Europe have waited, breathlessly, on the pronouncements of a daughter of the Lodge- they're well pleased. It's all served the purpose of warning British governments, 'How vigilant we will be, in pursuing our own interests. We'll not be ignored!'.
And... truthfully there is no downside for them. Their community does VERY WELL out of the backstop-farming, fisheries, subsidised by both EU and UK. And in any alternative to the backstop, they are confident NI will continue, in the age of Britain The Great, to be an 'special economic area' in British Government hearts.

All that was actually at stake for them was:
Could the costs, liability, nuisance value, and ongoing tiresome continuous negotiation with UK of developing and managing a unique and untried form of EU-UK economic border, be made the responsibility of the Republic of Ireland, ideally isolated from the rest of the EU?
 

galteeman

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Perhaps they should stick Bertie and Trimble in a room with a bunch of govt. officials for the next week and see if they can come up with something.
 

Hewson

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EU BIRDCAGE - #BBC #News - #Corruption across EU 'breathtaking' - #EU #Commission... 🇪🇺

You do realise that the article you've posted is about corruption in society, don't you, not corruption in the day-to-day workings of the EU institutions?

Also, it's from 2014, so not exactly what you'd call 'current'.
 

Tippytop

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It is all a bit more long term and simpler than that.

The facts are that our former colonial masters have declared economic war on this country and have torn up the Good Friday Agreement.

The background to that is centuries of colonial mis-rule.

During the 753 years when the people on the neighbouring island were lording it over us they destroyed our culture, confiscated our land to pay their armies, planted their own people when they cleared the native Irish from that land, deprived Irish people of even their most basic rights, starved them to death, cleared them to the extremes of the world and pauperised the country by destroying economic life and transferring the wealth to London.

In contrast in the short period since we joined the European Community in 1973 we have gained 43 bn euro and have signed a treaty which makes all of us equal citizens with nearly 500 million other Europeans.

Much of the motivation of contempt for fellow Europeans which backs no-deal Brexit is similar to the motivation of contempt for the Irish which applied in London during the centuries of colonial misrule in Ireland.

It is still declared daily in the gutter London media.

It is all Paddy's fault.
I am sure you guys know more than we do but facts are facts, on November 1, they will be the EUs biggest customer, by a long way. The trade deal talks will fail because the brits are not that interested and the French will be so pissed at the fish deal etc etc. To be honest, im not even sure a deal is in the brits interest but there will be some in europe that squeal. My point was it would be best if it wasnt an "irishman" that screwed things up for bavaria etc.......
 

RasherHash

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raetsel

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Just heard on Radio Ulster: Scottish judges have ruled that Johnson's proroguing of Parliament is illegal. No link yet - just a radio announcement on Nolan Show.
 

Sync

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The aging is some of the most interesting stuff there. The youth of NI overwhelmingly voted Remain, if Brexit messes up then you can see that 60/40 split increasing to where the overall numbers in favour of Unity moves beyond margin of error in consistent polls. And then it’s referendum time.
 

Sync

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Always going to the Supreme Court regardless, but worth noting that the Scots case was further ahead than the others and importantly; the court had access to more evidence on why the proroguing was taking place.

A finding that Bojo’s council misled the queen would be fun.
 

Dame_Enda

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I'd like to know the reasoning of the court. We'll see what happens when it gets to the UK Supreme Court, most of which was appointed by David Cameron's government. It should be noted that this will set a precedent if there are restrictions on the Royal Prerogative of prorogation. Its hardly the first time parliament was prorogued for political reasons. John Major's government prorogued parliament to forestall the release of the Cash for Questions report. Labour prorogued Parliament to stop the House of Lords delaying the reduction of their delaying power to one session from 2, and when that was challenged in court it was upheld.
 

raetsel

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Those poll results come as no surprise. The straws have been in the wind for some time. They are the best possible argument that Leo could possibly use for the backstop.
Because a border referendum won narrowly by nationalists is going to present far bigger problems on this island. Because in the absence of any compromise from unionists moderate nationalists have no incentive to compromise either.
 

james toney

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You have to wonder if he might be considering this as a sop to calm the DUP down just as he fvcks them overboard with the backstop.
On the wonderful BBC documentary this evening "Spotlight on the Troubles: a Secret History", Brian Faulkner's private secretary recounted how His boss had asked for an assurance from British PM Ted Heath that he had his back. Heath put his arm around Faulkner and said "Brian I'm right behind you." A few weeks later Stormont was prorogued.
The bridge is a non runner...and it's the suggestion of lunatics in Downing st and the DUP grasping at whatever straws are left.

Johnson first floated the idea of a Brexit bridge across the Irish Sea when he was Foreign Secretary in 2018 and has revived it since entering Downing Street.
His proposal was, at the time, branded by one expert as a "thoughtless soundbite" which "no sane contractor or responsible government" would sanction.
Writing to the Sunday Times, James Duncan, a retired offshore engineer from Edinburgh wrote: "I know this is about as feasible as building a bridge to the moon.
"Many long bridges have been built, but none across such a wide, deep and stormy stretch of water.
 


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