BREXIT: the general forum (Second Thread)

shiel

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 14, 2011
Messages
18,952
The UK is one of the least racist places in Europe, and indeed the world.
Leaving out the centuries of colonial contempt for everyone the English racist Brexiteers have torn up a current agreement to cooperate with fellow European citizens.

They have also torn up a current agreement to draw a line under centuries of colonial contempt for those whom you describe in deliciously racist terms as 'Eire people'.

Keep it up.

All of us need reminders of the English racist contempt of present day Brexiteers.
 


CatullusV

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 9, 2018
Messages
6,633
What amazes and angers me is knowing that the care of the elderly is flung in with fruit picking as a low skill, low paid work.

To properly care for grans, grandads, and people of all ages with disabilities at home or in nursing home is In fact, if done properly, a very skilled job and deserves to be paid as such.

The current treatment of care workers demeans them and their contribution to communities and society.

But even more than that it also demeans the ill elderly, the demented elderly and anyone of any age incapacitated by debilitating illnesses.
I couldn't agree more.
 

Lumpy Talbot

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 30, 2015
Messages
32,135
Twitter
No
Thing is as well that if you get some low paid character in a care home setting it won't be long before they'd start getting irritated by the people in the home. Properly trained people on proper wages should be a minimum in this area.
 

CatullusV

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 9, 2018
Messages
6,633
I think one of the Roman Emperors thought it would take a legion and a few auxiliaries to subdue Ireland but I suspect they noticed that it was heavily wooded and with a load of bogland as well further out. As well as some fairly dark tales about the barbarians living there, a wild and savage lot, it would have looked very like a sort of Teutenborg Forest write large to an army that counted on formation and swift co-ordinated movement and needed open space in which to make that advantage tell.

It is mentioned in Gibbon and referred to by Tacitus in his writings I believe that there were plans to invade Ireland but that they never came to fruition.
If those plans had come to fruition we'd have needed foreigners in to pick those fruits.
 

CatullusV

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 9, 2018
Messages
6,633
To get back to the subject.

Brexit has torn up agreements with nearly thirty European democracies. Those agreements enabled cooperation in matters of mutual interest in a continent with a centuries long history of imperial/totalitarian war. The vote by Brexiteers is, therefore, an expression of contempt for European fellow citizens.

Brexiteers want to tear up the Good Friday Agreement but the EU has prevented that so far.

The GFA is an agreement the UK signed with a former colony to draw a line under centuries of colonial rule. The vote in favour of tearing up the GFA, therefore, is an expression of contempt for the people of this island the majority of whom voted for the GFA.

If the UK sticks with its present negotiating situation then the future does not look good for Ireland.

The narrative then will boil down to who is going to be blamed for the debacle that is going to ensue.

No doubt Boris Johnson is of course going to blame Paddy.

Despite how indefensible that is Brexiteers and their arse lickers in this country will agree with him.
Please F.U.C.K. off with this repetitive crap. You made your point a long time ago. You are coming across like a character in a Conan Doyle story. Monomania followed by Brain Fever.
 

CatullusV

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 9, 2018
Messages
6,633
Now, when the UK's relationships with the EU is being tidied up, would be a good time to remove other privileges which foreigners in the UK enjoy - such as the right of Eire people to vote in the UK, the right of Eire people to infiltrate the UK and the right of Eire people to remain in the UK.
"tidied up"?
Good one.
 

Ireniall

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 7, 2011
Messages
8,676
History is history. You Eirefolk left the UK and do not seem to be able to understand that, when YOU became independent of the UK, the people of the UK became independent of YOU. Is there any reason why you cannot keep your noses out of other people's affairs?
We're beginning to see the positive side of the UK leaving though. Having been net contributors to the crown for our whole miserable existence as part of that entity it would be too much to think that our EU contributions might start to find their way there again. At least now this can't happen.:)
 

shiel

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 14, 2011
Messages
18,952
Please F.U.C.K. off with this repetitive crap. You made your point a long time ago. You are coming across like a character in a Conan Doyle story. Monomania followed by Brain Fever.
I love it when people highlight the contempt that is involved in the Brexit movement.

All of us need to be continuously reminded of such.

Keep it up.
 

paulp

Well-known member
Joined
May 5, 2007
Messages
7,478
We're beginning to see the positive side of the UK leaving though. Having been net contributors to the crown for our whole miserable existence as part of that entity it would be too much to think that our EU contributions might start to find their way there again. At least now this can't happen.:)
:-(
it's inevitable though
give it 20 to 30 years, UK (albeit a smaller version) will re-join, and there will be a investment required from EU to get them up to average EU standard
 

Ireniall

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 7, 2011
Messages
8,676
:-(
it's inevitable though
give it 20 to 30 years, UK (albeit a smaller version) will re-join, and there will be a investment required from EU to get them up to average EU standard
I just don't know. I feel that they will never rejoin and I definitely feel that they should never be allowed back into to the main EU body but that might depend on whether the younger pro - remain people show signs of becoming incorrigible old farts as they get older-in other words if we can be sure that they have been cured of the eurosceptic disease.

Also , while I understand that Brexit has not actually happened yet, I would have expected the UK to be showing more adverse effects by now. I think that when it finally kicks in it may not get any worse than their own assessments of a max of 8% of gdp growth potential being sacrificed. Unlike the post-war years and especially the late sixties and seventies their industry is pretty modern and efficient and will largely survive the transition and too much of their EU economic success was taken up by a rising population with negatives for housing and services and the rest. Lower growth might suit them better.

But their greatest loss by far will be sovereignty. With their history over the last century they have wielded unprecedented influence over world events and far from diminishing this status their heavy-weight presence in the EU did nothing but enhance it and mitigated the natural decline that it would have been subject to given the fact that they're actually quite a small country. They had 27 mostly fellow Nato members to call on in any kind of international dust-up and were part of a huge area of well advanced countries with collectively the biggest economy in the world. Their closest ally on this Earth, the USA, to whom they have relatively seamlessly relinquished the leadership of the Anglosphere and the western world in general and on whom so much of their own status depends, cannot, in what is left of the brains trust in Washington, be pleased that their easiest ally has so firmly removed themselves from a central seat at the table in an area of the world which might might be less inclined to align with them while they deal with the rise of the Chinese in the Pacific.
 

Lumpy Talbot

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 30, 2015
Messages
32,135
Twitter
No
That's the real puzzle. What act or hand did the US play in the Brexit capers? There is no way Cameron would have been allowed to hold a referendum on EU membership if the Americans wanted its listening post sat at meetings in Brussels.

Which means the referendum and subsequent result must at least have had the tacit approval of Washington. I can see the advantage to the US in promoting or supporting the UK leaving the EU trading bloc as it can then only really turn to one other major trading bloc and that is the US itself. So the 'captured customer' becomes a new 70 million market for US exporters.

The economic reasoning is easy, from Washington's point of view. But it feels like there has been a political change somewhere along the line and that transition point from the UK being usefully at all EU meetings to being more useful as a market is a somewhat obscure one. I know there has been real trouble in the background over the spying and hacking of EU communication systems by UK intelligence agencies back as far as 2009-2011.
 

Lumpy Talbot

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 30, 2015
Messages
32,135
Twitter
No
In the unlikely event that the faction of Brexiteers currently running the Tory party are acting in the UK's national interest, I suspect they may turn out to have made a strategic error.

Whether on purpose or accidentally remains to be seen. Long term I can't see anything other now than the UK becoming a US state or dominion off the coast of Europe. The US-UK trade deal will automatically accomplish much of that which has not been achieved already. The renewal of Trident at enormous cost doesn't help with an alternative view.

The idea that Britain can achieve a freedom by unchaining itself from a system in which it has some say and chaining itself even more tightly to a system in which it has no say at all is a strange way to strike out for independent sovereignty.
 

parentheses

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 26, 2011
Messages
14,520
That's the real puzzle. What act or hand did the US play in the Brexit capers? There is no way Cameron would have been allowed to hold a referendum on EU membership if the Americans wanted its listening post sat at meetings in Brussels.

Which means the referendum and subsequent result must at least have had the tacit approval of Washington. I can see the advantage to the US in promoting or supporting the UK leaving the EU trading bloc as it can then only really turn to one other major trading bloc and that is the US itself. So the 'captured customer' becomes a new 70 million market for US exporters.

The economic reasoning is easy, from Washington's point of view. But it feels like there has been a political change somewhere along the line and that transition point from the UK being usefully at all EU meetings to being more useful as a market is a somewhat obscure one. I know there has been real trouble in the background over the spying and hacking of EU communication systems by UK intelligence agencies back as far as 2009-2011.
My personal theory is Trump and Brexit were caused by Obama's decision to sign the JCPOA agreement.
 

CatullusV

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 9, 2018
Messages
6,633
I love it when people highlight the contempt that is involved in the Brexit movement.

All of us need to be continuously reminded of such.

Keep it up.
"All of us"?

Not me.

What other things do "All of us" need to be reminded of? That most birds fly? That there is a monstrosity of a metal tower in Paris? That day follows night follows day?
 


New Threads

Popular Threads

Most Replies

Top