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Brick-laying robot

Polly Ticks

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An Australian firm has created a robot that can layout a small house in 24 hours.

Pretty impressive.

Popular Mechanics story

[video=youtube;4YcrO8ONcfY]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4YcrO8ONcfY[/video]

Fastbrick Robotics is a bricklaying company that promises end-to-end automation. With a 30 meter arm, their Hadrian X robot uses an adhesive instead of mortar and follows the patterns laid out by 3D models. Hadrian X is expected to be at construction sites within the year, according to CEO Mike Pivac. "We think from that time on, the world is our oyster," he told The West Australian.
0.5mm accuracy too.

Call me old-fashioned, call me curmudgeonly, call me Al, call me whatever you want, but is there something missing here?

I do feel the structure might be improved by the introduction of cement.
 


ivnryn

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I do feel the structure might be improved by the introduction of cement.
They use adhesive that achieves the same goal.

It's not like they don't actually stick the blocks together. The advantage of adhesive is that the machine can apply it more easily (and presumably consistently).
 

maxflinn

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Some chap from Limerick has invented a robot that can do that too but he fecks off to the pub every day at lunchtime and doesn't come back!
 

Polly Ticks

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They use adhesive that achieves the same goal.

It's not like they don't actually stick the blocks together. The advantage of adhesive is that the machine can apply it more easily (and presumably consistently).
I was wondering (seemed at one point that something was being injected inside the brick, but wasn't sure) Thanks for that! :)

What about the visible gaps perpendicular to the ground that are visible between the bricks though?
 
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silverharp

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I'd loved to have had one of those German Hof houses where they come over and assemble it over a weekend. Building houses still seems to be a cottage industry, think of all the rubbish built during the boom
 

Polly Ticks

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Saw a 6-bedroom house go up in about a week down the street here in Redcated, USA, including all the interior fittings... from an empty lot to a 6-bed house ready to go in a week.. quite incredible.. wooden of course, which makes it easier... and let's face it, lots of cheap Mexican labor, so people swarming all over every part of the house.. but just in terms of human effort amazing to watch.
 

PBP voter

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Plasterers need not apply for work these days.

They have a machine that can do it. Anybody can use the machine.

:) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :)
 

carlovian

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Some chap from Limerick has invented a robot that can do that too but he fecks off to the pub every day at lunchtime and doesn't come back!
But what about the robot ?
 

sadcitizen

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Amazing. Imagine being able to have your own floor plan implemented. It only makes sense.

Having said that, I get mad pleasure from seeing the work of competent (human) brick layers, tilers, etc
 

The Field Marshal

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I would avoid it like the plague

It looks incapable of responding sensitively to the varying exigencies of a building site.
In addition there is nothing about the most vital component of all ie what holds the blocks together because that is the most impotent part.

There is mention of glue?

Glue?

What kind of glue and maybe the kind that that frost dissolves and weakens.

These inventions often come from the brains of people with no real experience at all of life in the mainstream.

I can see the advantage of a machine because block laying is back breaking work
but such universal applications as illustrated in the video IMV would be quite limited.
 

Polly Ticks

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It looks incapable of responding sensitively to the varying exigencies of a building site.


universal applications as illustrated in the video IMV would be quite limited.
.5mm accuracy... I wonder how that compares to human bricklayers.

but you have a point about how it well it will or will not function in the more cluttered and complex environment of a building site.

From a 1996 (!) German study "Practical Sensor Strategies for On-Site Positioning of a
Mobile Bricklaying Robot
"

The authors describe practical sensor systems suitable for a mobile bricklaying robot for
automated masonry construction on a building site. The major sources of error encountered
during the automated masonry construction process as well as the required tolerances for the
masonry process are described. Based on these considerations, two sensor strategies for
positioning and orientating the robot are described in detail.

In the future, the production of residential buildings in Germany will be strongly influenced
through the use of mobile bricklaying robots for use on the construction site. Fundamental
concepts and enabling technologies for this type of robot as well as the prototype BRONCO
have been presented by the authors in recent years [I - 3].

One important issue for automated bricklaying within the building site environment is the
assurance of positioning accuracy of the bricks. In this respect the bricklaying process can be
divided into three processes:
(1) determination of the position and orientation of the mobile robot on the building storey,
(2) removal of a brick from a prepared pallet and calibration of its position with respect to
the robots tool center point (TCP),
(3) placement of the brick in its correct position within the brickwork.
 
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PBP voter

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Civic_critic2

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These inventions often come from the brains of people with no real experience at all of life in the mainstream.

I can see the advantage of a machine because block laying is back breaking work
but such universal applications as illustrated in the video IMV would be quite limited.
You're a funny old bird Field Marshal. These objections will easily be dealt with, you break the problem into its parts and then solve each one of them. There will be error correction and human monitoring, quick reset and pause. If they use mortar they will be able to do realtime analyis of its properties as it's laid down.

In addition these new methods will mean the old materials used in house construction and their configuration will change in line with the robot's capabilities. As well as that the very items used in construction from the materials to the tools will be able increasingly to be prepared locally. So for example it is possible to create bricks on site using the materials roundabout. It will also be possible to 3d print and assemble the heavy machinery used to do the construction. If Brilliant Light Power is for real - and their independent validators seem credible - then the energy for running the heavy machinery will be easily available, abundant and cheap.
 

Ardillaun

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Forty years ago, my parents had a prefab house built one summer and it still looks good. Bricklaying has always seemed like a weird anachronism to me. In most parts of Canada, once you get above the basement blocks it's strictly for ornamentation.
 

wombat

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Forty years ago, my parents had a prefab house built one summer and it still looks good. Bricklaying has always seemed like a weird anachronism to me. In most parts of Canada, once you get above the basement blocks it's strictly for ornamentation.
Totally different building system. Houses in North America are mainly timber frame, in Ireland and UK, they tend to be concrete block, in Australia, they tend towards bricks. The more efficient building methods are used on bigger buildings where you get into precast slabs or structural steel skeletons.
 

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