• Due to a glitch in the old vBulletin software, some users were "banned" when they tried to change their passwords at the end of February. This does not apply after the site was converted to Xenforo. If you were affected by this, please us viua the Contact us link in the footer.

britain demanding huge cuts to eu budget, they should decide if they're in or out


dancl2000

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Messages
517
britain is not compromising on a demand to reduce the eu budget by 20% and the polish commissioner has told them to decide if they're in europe or out
EU Budget Commissioner Challenges UK Loyalty to Europe - SPIEGEL ONLINE

The eu commission does some communication on where the money goes, a lot of is spent back into the individual member states through various activities such as research, cap, .... other areas 6% goes to admin, 7% on eu foreign policy and 1% on 2% on protection of rights and justice.
http://ec.europa.eu/budget/library/biblio/publications/2011/fin_report/fin_report_11_en.pdf

a 20% reduction in budget seems massive, what would the areas to cut be ? or is this a case where the british pm is simply scoring points in british national politics by being seen to be difficult in europe ? by demanding the impossible David Cameron can hold up the eu budgetary process via the british veto and effectively hold europe to ransom, to the applause of the conservative euro skeptics

So is it reasonable to score points in national politics by obstructing european process ? If so then should britain just drop out of the union rather than disrupt the cooperation of others. Or does David Cameron really think a 20% budget reduction is both desirable and feasible ? How could such cuts be achieved, what would have to be sacrificed ?
 


Disillusioned democrat

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 16, 2010
Messages
15,736
To be honest when I heard on the news the other day that the EU was looking for a bigger budget I was outraged - they have failed to regulate the banks that support their pet currency and have failed to take responsibility for the crisis caused by banks under their umbrella "regulation", and have failed to come up with a response 4 years into a crisis. Their citizens are asked to pay more tax for less income and the EU leadership is completely unaccountable.

I think just because it's Britain demanding something doesn't make it wrong - I'm beginning to see Barrossa as a Senator Palpatine character, looking to use crisis to increase his powers and influence and to be honest I'd almost be in favour of exiting the EU myself now for all the good it's got us....it let FF buy two elections with inward investment but is now looking for payback.
 

niall78

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 10, 2010
Messages
11,283
The EU has no problem asking other countries to make huge reductions in their budgets. What's good for the goose is good for the gander.
 

Con Gallagher

Well-known member
Joined
May 25, 2010
Messages
2,413
britain is not compromising on a demand to reduce the eu budget by 20% and the polish commissioner has told them to decide if they're in europe or out
EU Budget Commissioner Challenges UK Loyalty to Europe - SPIEGEL ONLINE

The eu commission does some communication on where the money goes, a lot of is spent back into the individual member states through various activities such as research, cap, .... other areas 6% goes to admin, 7% on eu foreign policy and 1% on 2% on protection of rights and justice.
http://ec.europa.eu/budget/library/biblio/publications/2011/fin_report/fin_report_11_en.pdf

a 20% reduction in budget seems massive, what would the areas to cut be ? or is this a case where the british pm is simply scoring points in british national politics by being seen to be difficult in europe ? by demanding the impossible David Cameron can hold up the eu budgetary process via the british veto and effectively hold europe to ransom, to the applause of the conservative euro skeptics

So is it reasonable to score points in national politics by obstructing european process ? If so then should britain just drop out of the union rather than disrupt the cooperation of others. Or does David Cameron really think a 20% budget reduction is both desirable and feasible ? How could such cuts be achieved, what would have to be sacrificed ?
Is there any reason why David and Cameron are the only proper nouns which you capitalised?
 
M

MrFunkyBoogaloo

britain is not compromising on a demand to reduce the eu budget by 20% and the polish commissioner has told them to decide if they're in europe or out
EU Budget Commissioner Challenges UK Loyalty to Europe - SPIEGEL ONLINE

The eu commission does some communication on where the money goes, a lot of is spent back into the individual member states through various activities such as research, cap, .... other areas 6% goes to admin, 7% on eu foreign policy and 1% on 2% on protection of rights and justice.
http://ec.europa.eu/budget/library/biblio/publications/2011/fin_report/fin_report_11_en.pdf

a 20% reduction in budget seems massive, what would the areas to cut be ? or is this a case where the british pm is simply scoring points in british national politics by being seen to be difficult in europe ? by demanding the impossible David Cameron can hold up the eu budgetary process via the british veto and effectively hold europe to ransom, to the applause of the conservative euro skeptics

So is it reasonable to score points in national politics by obstructing european process ? If so then should britain just drop out of the union rather than disrupt the cooperation of others. Or does David Cameron really think a 20% budget reduction is both desirable and feasible ? How could such cuts be achieved, what would have to be sacrificed ?
Why is it that Britain bear the brunt of this charade? Denmark and Sweden have also voiced concerns about the EU budget with Denmark also threatening to veto the budget proposal. Perhaps they too should decide if they're in or out.

The budget proposals for 2014-2020 are estimated to cost in the region of €1,033 billion, so a 20% cut would be circa 207 billion or 34 billion per annum out of a €172 billion p/a budget.

I think it highly reasonable for member states who are pursuing austerity policies to insist that the EU do the same.
 

The System Works

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 24, 2011
Messages
2,290
Website
www.thesystemworks.wordpress.com
Twitter
@mendingtheworld
britain is not compromising on a demand to reduce the eu budget by 20% and the polish commissioner has told them to decide if they're in europe or out
EU Budget Commissioner Challenges UK Loyalty to Europe - SPIEGEL ONLINE

The eu commission does some communication on where the money goes, a lot of is spent back into the individual member states through various activities such as research, cap, .... other areas 6% goes to admin, 7% on eu foreign policy and 1% on 2% on protection of rights and justice.
http://ec.europa.eu/budget/library/biblio/publications/2011/fin_report/fin_report_11_en.pdf

a 20% reduction in budget seems massive, what would the areas to cut be ? or is this a case where the british pm is simply scoring points in british national politics by being seen to be difficult in europe ? by demanding the impossible David Cameron can hold up the eu budgetary process via the british veto and effectively hold europe to ransom, to the applause of the conservative euro skeptics

So is it reasonable to score points in national politics by obstructing european process ? If so then should britain just drop out of the union rather than disrupt the cooperation of others. Or does David Cameron really think a 20% budget reduction is both desirable and feasible ? How could such cuts be achieved, what would have to be sacrificed ?
I wish we could just get out.

And by the way, this government is making domestic cutbacks, so why not cutbacks in the amount going to Brussels? Is that so unfeasible?
 
M

MrFunkyBoogaloo

I wish we could just get out.

And by the way, this government is making domestic cutbacks, so why not cutbacks in the amount going to Brussels? Is that so unfeasible?
The fact that Ireland isn't calling for cuts to the EU budget when the EU insists on the same here says a lot about the government.
 

cytex

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 10, 2010
Messages
3,424
Why is it that Britain bear the brunt of this charade? Denmark and Sweden have also voiced concerns about the EU budget with Denmark also threatening to veto the budget proposal. Perhaps they too should decide if they're in or out.

The budget proposals for 2014-2020 are estimated to cost in the region of €1,033 billion, so a 20% cut would be circa 207 billion or 34 billion per annum out of a €172 billion p/a budget.

I think it highly reasonable for member states who are pursuing austerity policies to insist that the EU do the same.
All i can say is fair play to britain and the others on this and if people want to push all the credit onto britan im sure they wont mind getting all the kudos.
 

Spanner Island

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 22, 2011
Messages
24,199
To be honest when I heard on the news the other day that the EU was looking for a bigger budget I was outraged - they have failed to regulate the banks that support their pet currency and have failed to take responsibility for the crisis caused by banks under their umbrella "regulation", and have failed to come up with a response 4 years into a crisis. Their citizens are asked to pay more tax for less income and the EU leadership is completely unaccountable.

I think just because it's Britain demanding something doesn't make it wrong - I'm beginning to see Barrossa as a Senator Palpatine character, looking to use crisis to increase his powers and influence and to be honest I'd almost be in favour of exiting the EU myself now for all the good it's got us....it let FF buy two elections with inward investment but is now looking for payback.
Don't forget either that the EU has consistently failed miserably to balance its own books...

It ain't called a gravy train for nothing...

And as for Barosso, can't stand him. I've little doubt he's an embarrassment to decent ordinary Portuguese citizens...
 

dancl2000

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Messages
517
Why is it that Britain bear the brunt of this charade? Denmark and Sweden have also voiced concerns about the EU budget with Denmark also threatening to veto the budget proposal. Perhaps they too should decide if they're in or out.

The budget proposals for 2014-2020 are estimated to cost in the region of €1,033 billion, so a 20% cut would be circa 207 billion or 34 billion per annum out of a €172 billion p/a budget.

I think it highly reasonable for member states who are pursuing austerity policies to insist that the EU do the same.
I'm fine with the idea that the EU should be cutting back spending and looking to where cutbacks make sense. Most countries are asking this; germany in addition to the ones you mention

What i'm less ok with is obstructing european process for the sake of scoring points. If a 20% budget reduction is not feasible, and that seems like a pretty enormous number, then this is obstructiveness, not a call for cutbacks.

I think we can all agree that whatever the problems of europe, it doesnt help anyone that agreement at the european level is held up so that David Cameron can score points in national politics.
 

niall78

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 10, 2010
Messages
11,283
I think we can all agree that whatever the problems of europe, it doesnt help anyone that agreement at the european level is held up so that David Cameron can score points in national politics.
Isn't the Irish 'bail-out' held up while we wait for a German election in a years time? Is that helpful? All EU countries operate in their own national interest except perhaps countries like Ireland. And we can see where that has got us.
 

Plebian

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 20, 2011
Messages
9,339
All the Europhiles love telling us that the Germans are signing the cheques and that they're entitled to call the shots. The Brits have signed more than enough cheques to be entitled to have their say in how Europe is run.
 
M

MrFunkyBoogaloo

I'm fine with the idea that the EU should be cutting back spending and looking to where cutbacks make sense. Most countries are asking this; germany in addition to the ones you mention

What i'm less ok with is obstructing european process for the sake of scoring points. If a 20% budget reduction is not feasible, and that seems like a pretty enormous number, then this is obstructiveness, not a call for cutbacks.

I think we can all agree that whatever the problems of europe, it doesnt help anyone that agreement at the european level is held up so that David Cameron can score points in national politics.
As TA said above Cameron is grandstanding.

Every member state in the EU is guilty of same.

As for criticising Britain for what is its legal right. Sure, some may say it holds up European progress but those are the rules negotiated and signed up to. The EU shouldn't complain about it. The same argument was put forward when Ireland rejected the Lisbon and Nice Treaties and, as far as I'm concerned, it's bubkis.

Thems are the rules of the club.
 

forest

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 19, 2006
Messages
3,373
The UK has signed up to various treaties outlining how the EU is run
 

kvran

Well-known member
Joined
May 6, 2010
Messages
1,145
People are mixing up a lot of institutions here. The commission and parliament have had limited role in crisis response, it has mostly fallen to the ECB, Council and IMF hence why we talk about the Troika. The respective member states are more to blame than the community institutions.

While I am not opposed to freezing the EU budget for the time being the people who lose out are the recipients of structural funds, fishermen, farmers and developing countries receiving development aid. The argument in favour of the budget is that the EUs compentencies have been expanding since the ratification of the lisbon treaty particularly with the EEAF and that required money and now more than ever structural funded are needed as a form of stimulus in member states.

The reason the EU cant sign off on its books is because the way money moves to where it is needed results in corruption, the EU isn't responsible for the end use of the money, it distributes the money and national authorities spend it, the corruption occurs with the national authorities and the Council naturally isn't willing to support the Commission in combating corruption.

6% for administration signs quite efficient to me (whats the cost in Ireland or UK) and the overall EU budget is quite small in comparison to member states.

You'll notice those in critical of the budget are those who pay except for the Germans, I wonder what eurosceptics would be saying if Germany was calling for budget cuts to the EU.
 

New Threads

Popular Threads

Most Replies

Top