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British Vitriol Against the Irish: Documenting Thread


GDPR

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You are writing twaddle as you don't know what you are talking about. See post #636
No Grace, you are repeating old c19 saws about John Bulls Other Island and the eternal conundrum of Celt vs Saxon. Ireland, Britains next door neighbour, with whom it has a long involved history, is not an enigma, wrapped inside a spyhinx, to the British - they simply are not interested in what happens there until it affects them.
 

GDPR

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No Grace, you are repeating old c19 saws about John Bulls Other Island and the eternal conundrum of Celt vs Saxon. Ireland, Britains next door neighbour, with whom it has a long involved history, is not an enigma, wrapped inside a spyhinx, to the British - they simply are not interested in what happens there until it affects them.
And you are ignoring the reality that (for instance) the Times of London has a daily, substantial, Ireland section reporting on matters related to Ireland and sometimes relevant to the Brits. So you are utterly wrong.

Here are some of the headlines from today's Times Ireland section:

Silver medals for underdogs who feared no one
European court to set precedent with pre-Brexit extradition case
Humber group deserve the spotlight
O'Brien pressed newspaper to give INM work to his friends
Class sizes rising despite influx of new teachers
Sinn Fein leader doubles down on need for border poll
This time it's personal: Knock vows to bring Pope to people
How Phoenix Park rose to the challeng of 1.2m people
Transport Minister's backtracking criticised
Analysis: You don't have to look far for a 'workable' law
Warnings signs for cyclists at deadly mountain pass
In 1979, John Paul II visited a very different Ireland
Hume was my guide for talks, says Clinton
McAleese 'disappointed' that North will miss out

Lots and lots more
 
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GDPR

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And you are ignoring the reality that (for instance) the Times of London has a daily, substantial, Ireland section reporting on matters related to Ireland and sometimes relevant to the Brits. So you are utterly wrong.
Where do you get this idea that the British are "stumped" by the Irish? They are not at all.

Their actions are not informed by bewilderment because they dont know how the Irish will behave or react, they are such mysterious beings.

British policy in Ireland or towards Ireland may have been very wrong at times, or sometimes quite enlightened, but it was always based (up till now) on their own pragmatic interests and what they felt (often correctly) they could get away with. They werent shaking their heads over the mystical properties of Irishness.

For the first time, they are out in the cold internationally, having made a colossal mistake which has nothing to do with the Irish and the Irish arent baffling them with their leprechaun logic. The Irish are upholding the EUs position and that is very rational.
 

GDPR

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No, Eagle should go to boards.ie permanently. petunia
Well if you cant take disagreement, Grace, thats your problem. The British arent "stumped" by the Irish national character in the Brexit negotiations - they have Barnier and a host of others to explain it to them. :)
 

Ardillaun

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Brexit does introduce all sorts of uncertainties and the DUP is peculiarly ill-equipped to adapt to this new reality (or modernity in general). However, a Border poll involves a lot more than the usual politics; like Brexit it’s a leap into the unknown and there is no consensus whatsoever on what a UI vote would mean for the wallets of anyone on the island. Some nationalists will surely think to themselves, why take the risk?
 

Lord Talbot

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Ireland is of course part of the British news cycle as the UK's second largest piece of land is in Ireland.

But the Irish press are absolutely obsessed with the British.

London is more focused on the continent than Ireland. Its closer to France after all.
 

GDPR

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Ireland is of course part of the British news cycle as the UK's second largest piece of land is in Ireland.

But the Irish press are absolutely obsessed with the British.

London is more focused on the continent than Ireland. Its closer to France after all.
Nonsense. Media reports about the continent are quite rare.
 

JimmyFoley

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No, Eagle should go to boards.ie permanently. petunia
I meant that when she says 'I have something to do', it doesn't mean what it does for normal folk, e.g. go to the cinema or have dinner with family; it simply means she posts on another thread. :)
 

GDPR

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Well if you cant take disagreement, Grace, thats your problem. The British arent "stumped" by the Irish national character in the Brexit negotiations - they have Barnier and a host of others to explain it to them. :)
So the brits need the continentals to explain the Irish to them?
 

Ardillaun

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Ireland is of course part of the British news cycle as the UK's second largest piece of land is in Ireland.

But the Irish press are absolutely obsessed with the British.

London is more focused on the continent than Ireland. Its closer to France after all.
It’s the same elsewhere: Canada/US; Pakistan and Bangladesh and Sri Lanka/India. The smaller country will inevitably spend more of its time thinking of the larger.
 

GDPR

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It’s the same elsewhere: Canada/US; Pakistan and Bangladesh and Sri Lanka/India. The smaller country will inevitably spend more of its time thinking of the larger.
Well a part of Ireland is still in the UK, thats one big issue right there.

In my life time, I have seen Ireland become far, far, far less dependent on the UK. economically, socially, culturally. The fact that some Irish tabs are owned/operated by Murdoch or Dacre is increasingly irrelevant.
 

Plebian

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English ire towards the Irish does seem to be on the rise.

Daily Mail features a story about Ireland today. The comments by readers are extremely spiteful. Give us a sign: Wartime signal revealed by gorse fire... | Daily Mail Online
That's just the bottom feeding trolls that infest nearly every commentary board. They're just that bit nastier because it's the Daily Mail....... Frogs, Wops, Fritz etc, the bile just flows regardless of what foreigners they're spouting about.
 

ruserious

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[video=youtube_share;czStaF30vJ0]https://youtu.be/czStaF30vJ0[/video]

Good smack of a Hurley this fool needs.
 

sgtharper

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Jacob Rees-Mogg warned the Irish economy could suffer if the European Union decided to impose a border between the two Irish nations.

This does seem to be the accepted view right across the board does it not?

The staunch pro-Brexit politician suggested the British Government will no[ seek to create a physical border between Dublin and Belfast but will reject attempts from Brussels to control Northern Ireland.
No sign of a threat there as far as I can see.

He said: "When we leave the European Union we won’t have to impose any border in Ireland if we don’t want to. That will be a unilateral decision to be taken by the British Government.

Or there.

"If we do, if that is what the European Union wants and we go along with it, the losers will be the Republic of Ireland. The economy of the Republic of Ireland would be in very bad shape if we impose the common external tariff on them. Irish agriculture, with tariffs on beef of up to 70 percent would be ruined if we imposed that.

Or even there, as far as I can see he appears to be doing nothing other than pointing out what is generally known as the bleeding obvious?

It all seems rather prescient of him as far as I can see, and not remotely threatening at all, as you insisted when you posted the link to it.


 
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