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British Vitriol Against the Irish: Documenting Thread

death or glory

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James Craig, one of the earliest six county PM's, described the regime there as a 'Protestant Parliament for a Protestant people' and clearly had no intention of offering the hand of friendship to the Catholic population. Years of anti catholic bigotry, gerrymandering, sectarian violence and discrimination ultimately led to the rebellion in the late 1960's - as we all know to our cost.
In the negotiations for the GFA and subsequently, the province had a First Minister, Rev Ian Paisley, who was an active Protestant preacher leading his Protestant flock through the unpleasant task of compromising with their Catholic neighbours and allowing them a form of equality.
And the Catholic people were glad of that?
Pull the other one
No mention of RA terrorism.
The whitewashing of history continues.
 


D

Deleted member 51920

In other old news, ROI saw itself as a catholic country for a catholic people.
It wasnt until 1972 that this wording was removed from the constitution;



In case you hadn't noticed, we have all moved on since those days.
We have for sure
Not sure about 'up there' though
Reverend Paisley was First Minister right up to 2008
I don't recall any Bishops being Taoiseach down here
 
D

Deleted member 51920

No mention of RA terrorism.
The whitewashing of history continues.
Of course I mentioned it...

Years of anti catholic bigotry, gerrymandering, sectarian violence and discrimination ultimately led to the rebellion in the late 1960's - as we all know to our cost.
 

death or glory

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Of course I mentioned it...

Years of anti catholic bigotry, gerrymandering, sectarian violence and discrimination ultimately led to the rebellion in the late 1960's - as we all know to our cost.
What about the RA border campaign.
They hadn't t gone away you know.
Ra terrorism was always and is the underlying cancer affecting Ulster.
Ulster was no more sectarian than Eire was, they were mirror images.
 
D

Deleted member 51920

What about the RA border campaign.
They hadn't t gone away you know.
Ra terrorism was always and is the underlying cancer affecting Ulster.
Ulster was no more sectarian than Eire was, they were mirror images.
Thats rubbish
There was no equivalent down here to the bigotry, sectarianism and discrimination that occurred in the North
Which is why we have never had a civil uprising of a similar nature
You cant expect people to accept that without protest
 

Newrybhoy

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Thats rubbish
There was no equivalent down here to the bigotry, sectarianism and discrimination that occurred in the North
Which is why we have never had a civil uprising of a similar nature
You cant expect people to accept that without protest
Protestant population in the RoI decimated to near extinction.

Catholic population in NI grown consistently since the inception of the State.

Now which country oppressed its minority again?
 

recedite

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I don't recall any Bishops being Taoiseach down here
Archbishop McQuaid acted as the overseer of the various Taoisigh.
In the John Charles McQuaid story lies the awesome power of the Catholic Church in Ireland in the mid-twentieth century...

It was not until the publication in 1987 of the de Valera papers relating to the drafting of the 1937 Constitution that the extent of McQuaid's power began to be fully appreciated....

the opening of the McQuaid archive a decade later, in 1997, revealed a homespun spy system which had won the admiration of the head of the FBI, the legendary J. Edgar Hoover.

A control freak, McQuaid mobilised government Departments, Dublin Corporation, and the medical, legal and teaching professions to defend "Catholic Ireland" from the liberal wiles of The Irish Times, Trinity College, and the Communist Party...


These papers showed how McQuaid, as president of Blackrock College, collaborated closely with de Valera in drafting the fundamental law of the State...

Like the tapes which brought down Richard Nixon's presidency, McQuaid left too much on record in his voluminous archive that casts him in an unfavourable light. The 700 boxes of letters show how elected politicians shamefully bowed to his crusade to rid "Catholic Ireland" of dissidents, Jews and especially Protestants..

Moreover, since McQuaid's death the stream of revelations about physical and sexual abuse by clergy in church institutions has shown that these evils were an integral part of the Catholic Church even in his day...

Commentators highlighted his controversial role in the Mother and Child dispute with Dr Noel Browne in 1951...
...it is time for the present Government to order the gardaí to trawl the McQuaid archive and investigate the extent and the roots of clerical child sex abuse. Until this is done, the McQuaid legacy will continue to haunt the Irish Catholic Church.
McQuaid has been betrayed by his own voluminous archive
 

Paddyc

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Protestant population in the RoI decimated to near extinction.

Catholic population in NI grown consistently since the inception of the State.

Now which country oppressed its minority again?
The Protestant minority in Ireland are over represented in the professions, large farm owners and in commerce. They have been leaving the island of Ireland in large numbers since the 18th century.

There is zero evidence of a campaign of oppression against them driven by the State and every time some numpty (waves at Newrybhoy) tries to raise this, he gets practically zero response in the State.

NI on the other hand.....
 
D

Deleted member 51920

Archbishop McQuaid acted as the overseer of the various Taoisigh.


McQuaid has been betrayed by his own voluminous archive
But in fairness I don't think the treatment of non Catholics in Ireland since independance has been anywhere near as harsh as the Catholic population were subjected to in the North.
And while the Church did have a strong influence on Government, laws were fairly equally applied to those of all religions.
Nor were there any clergy in Ministerial positions let alone Taoiseach - as was the case up North.
 

recedite

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But in fairness I don't think the treatment of non Catholics in Ireland since independance has been anywhere near as harsh as the Catholic population were subjected to in the North.
And while the Church did have a strong influence on Government, laws were fairly equally applied to those of all religions.
Its very difficult to make direct comparisons. The harsh experience of a catholic knowing they would not get a job in the H&W shipyard was real, but then it was not the result of state oppression, it was society.

The harsh experience of a protestant or jewish child attending the only state funded primary school in the village, and being told to sit in the corner while the rest of the class prepared for Holy Communion classes is also difficult to quantify.
Telling that child that his religious group is free to set up their own state funded school (if they can get the numbers) if they don't like the treatment they are getting, is not much consolation.

Nor were there any clergy in Ministerial positions let alone Taoiseach - as was the case up North.
Not a fair comparison. The hierarchical nature of the RCC means that no RC priest would be allowed to stand for election, even if he wanted to.

And as I pointed out, there was no need to have a priest elected as a TD when the Taoisigh deferred to the Archbishop anyway. Being on the actual ballot paper is unimportant when you are pulling the strings.
 
D

Deleted member 51920

Its very difficult to make direct comparisons. The harsh experience of a catholic knowing they would not get a job in the H&W shipyard was real, but then it was not the result of state oppression, it was society.

The harsh experience of a protestant or jewish child attending the only state funded primary school in the village, and being told to sit in the corner while the rest of the class prepared for Holy Communion classes is also difficult to quantify.
Telling that child that his religious group is free to set up their own state funded school (if they can get the numbers) if they don't like the treatment they are getting, is not much consolation.

Not a fair comparison. The hierarchical nature of the RCC means that no RC priest would be allowed to stand for election, even if he wanted to.

And as I pointed out, there was no need to have a priest elected as a TD when the Taoisigh deferred to the Archbishop anyway. Being on the actual ballot paper is unimportant when you are pulling the strings.

Comparing a kid getting his/her religion class off - to the discrimination that occurred in NI is utterly ridiculous. Most kids would have been absolutely delighted to get a class off.
And there was a lot more to the civil rights movement than not getting a job in H&W. In fact, some of the earliest civil rights marches were in Derry where Catholics demanded equal access to jobs and social housing and 'one man one vote'. And we all know how badly that ended - thanks to your friends in the RUC, the Paras, the B Specials and loyalist mobs.
The RCC in the South rightly forbade their clergy from standing for election - which gave a degree of seperation of Church and State. Yes politicians did take, and accept, advice from Church leaders - but legalised discrimination against a particular religion did not occur.
 

recedite

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The RCC in the South rightly forbade their clergy from standing for election - which gave a degree of seperation of Church and State. Yes politicians did take, and accept, advice from Church leaders - but legalised discrimination against a particular religion did not occur.
Separation of Church and State? Not sure if you are trolling now, or just joking.
In some legalistic way, the laws as designed by the Archbishop were being equally applied to all religions.
But try telling that to the outcast child sitting alone in the corner of the classroom, who felt a gross sense of inequality.
 
D

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Separation of Church and State? Not sure if you are trolling now, or just joking.
In some legalistic way, the laws as designed by the Archbishop were being equally applied to all religions.
But try telling that to the outcast child sitting alone in the corner of the classroom, who felt a gross sense of inequality.

Comparing a kid getting a class off school to the rampant discrimination that led to 30 years of war is just beyond stupid
End of conversation
 

Mickeymac

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Comparing a kid getting a class off school to the rampant discrimination that led to 30 years of war is just beyond stupid
End of conversation


That guy sir is probably the worst troll to have hit this forum for quite some time......ending conversation was a truly wise decision.
 

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