BT Young scientist winner interestingly wins with a topic his mother is a professional researcher in

silverharp

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So all well and good until you see the background of his mother. on the face of it it looks a bit suspicious , how much original thought went into this by himself or was he just his mother's "puppet" in all this? . it has given me an idea for junior though for next year, "BT young scientist winners and family connections a statistical exploration"

As a general thing it probably helps to have a family interest in science or engineering or whatnot and nobody would have an issue with this but in this case sailing very close to the wind combined with the fact there was no general openness about it.


http://www.eveningecho.ie/inlinecomment?p_p_id=DetailedStory_WAR_portalsuite&p_p_lifecycle=1&p_p_state=exclusive&p_p_mode=view&p_p_col_id=column-2&p_p_col_count=4&_DetailedStory_WAR_portalsuite_javax.portlet.action=doclickcount&_DetailedStory_WAR_portalsuite_uuid=8796cb4c-bec5-4359-a358-5b5f7c25982d&_DetailedStory_WAR_portalsuite_start=1&_DetailedStory_WAR_portalsuite_category=/PUBLICATIONS/EE-ECHO/NEWS&_DetailedStory_WAR_portalsuite_pubDate=2018-01-13T00:00:00Z



Cork does it again - Simon’s discovery wins Young Scientist Exhibition

A Cork student who has potentially discovered a cure for MRSA took home the main prize at the BT Young Scientist and Technology Exhibition (BTYSTE) at the BT in Dublin last night.

Simon Meehan, a 15-year-old student at Coláiste Choilm scooped the main prize for his project which discovered the presence of chemicals within the blackberry plant which could form antibiotics to combat the MRSA infection.

“I felt almost like a puppet. The hands and feet were moving but you almost feel like it's not you,” he said.

“He's one of the most unassuming and popular students. Everyone is delighted with his success.”

Proud parents Jeremy Meehan and Brigid Lucey attended the ceremony.



the mother

MRSA faces defeat from wild flower | Irish Examiner




A WILD flower growing in West Cork could hold the key to wiping out the deadly superbug MRSA, it has emerged.

MRSA faces defeat from wild flower
Researchers at Cork Institute of Technology (CIT) have revealed the bright yellow flower known as inula helenium kills the lethal bug, which is resistant to some of the strongest antibiotics on the market.



The trials were carried out by postgraduate student Susan O’Shea of CIT’s biological sciences department as part of a two-year research project, under the supervision of Dr Brigid Lucey, a senior medical scientist with the microbiology department of Cork University Hospital and Dr Lesley Cotter, a lecturer in biomedical sciences at CIT.
 


Finbar10

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So all well and good until you see the background of his mother. on the face of it it looks a bit suspicious , how much original thought went into this by himself or was he just his mother's "puppet" in all this? . it has given me an idea for junior though for next year, "BT young scientist winners and family connections a statistical exploration"

As a general thing it probably helps to have a family interest in science or engineering or whatnot and nobody would have an issue with this but in this case sailing very close to the wind combined with the fact there was no general openness about it.


http://www.eveningecho.ie/inlinecomment?p_p_id=DetailedStory_WAR_portalsuite&p_p_lifecycle=1&p_p_state=exclusive&p_p_mode=view&p_p_col_id=column-2&p_p_col_count=4&_DetailedStory_WAR_portalsuite_javax.portlet.action=doclickcount&_DetailedStory_WAR_portalsuite_uuid=8796cb4c-bec5-4359-a358-5b5f7c25982d&_DetailedStory_WAR_portalsuite_start=1&_DetailedStory_WAR_portalsuite_category=/PUBLICATIONS/EE-ECHO/NEWS&_DetailedStory_WAR_portalsuite_pubDate=2018-01-13T00:00:00Z








the mother

MRSA faces defeat from wild flower | Irish Examiner
I'd have had reservations starting an OP like that (give a kid a break and all that). Anyway, as you've started things ...

I'm sure the winner is smart as a whip, but some of the winning young scientist projects over the years have been technically impressive, so much so that one would usually have to assume a good amount of adult mentoring. Often that seems to be from some kind of inspirational science teacher. Many of the winners come from a small number of schools (often quite prestigious fee-paying ones, though not all, I think a community college in Kinsale Cork has had several winners also). So you've the combination of a good science teacher (who effectively has set up a production line gaining experience over several years) and very smart kids. Seems legitimate enough to me (though few have the chance to attend such a school).

To be fair to this year's winner, I'm sure extensive adult assistance and mentoring has been a common theme for most winners. However, there have also, no doubt, been a few genuine prodigies who truly came from nowhere. Didn't one of the billionaire Collison twins win this competition with some kind of computer-based project? But those twins had been taking advanced science classes since a young age. I remember a winning maths-based project from a kid who had really shown a gift and interest in maths from an early age (his parents were music teachers I think, so probably not much help there :) ).

However, I'd guess a fair percentage of winners probably have had a parent or two in an appropriate academic background (though it's of course not advertised). Some of my education originally was in the CIT in Cork, so I'd be familiar enough with the place. As another example, I think Sarah Flannery, who won with a cryptography-based project, had a father who used to lecture in that kind of computer area in the CIT also. I can think of another example of a winner with a maths-type project from Cork who had a parent who was a maths lecturer (in a different Cork third-level institution). I only know those particular examples because of the area, but I'm sure there have probably been several other examples from elsewhere in the country over the years. Maybe the parents just inspire and provide general guidance and help, but it's definitely a big advantage for a kid to have some kind of science academic as a parent! :) I'd say that if you burrowed down into the backgrounds of previous winners, quite a few of them would have had a parent or two with an academic science background.

A win is still impressive (it's just that these things are rarely done in a vacuum).
 
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Cellachán Chaisil

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- Can I touch it? - I've worked too long and hard on this for you to screw it up now.
 

Half Nelson

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Education is sometimes about using every advantage. It's the way of the world.
The same applies to many of the high scores in the LC.

Congrats to all involved.
 

ger12

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Yikes.
 

jmcc

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I remember a winning maths-based project from a kid who had really shown a gift and interest in maths from an early age (his parents were music teachers I think, so probably not much help there :) ).
You'd be surprised how closely Mathematics and Music are linked.
 

Catalpast

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I think its pretty well accepted that the top end awards given to schoolkids at the YSE have a lot of adult input whether by parent/s or teachers....

Must say I always enjoyed going to them back in my schooldays :cool:
 

Spirit Of Newgrange

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Alphonse

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They perhaps should have a competition for adults then ? And let the young scientists awards go to school children who do there own work instead of the ones who are presenting the ideas of adult scientists ?
 

Wascurito

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It's already well accepted that teachers play a big role in mentoring the student. The selling point for judges is that the student can him/herself show a high level of knowledge during the review stages.

So, I really don't see what the problem is.
 

Finbar10

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I think its pretty well accepted that the top end awards given to schoolkids at the YSE have a lot of adult input whether by parent/s or teachers....

Must say I always enjoyed going to them back in my schooldays :cool:
Probably happens a lot for "continuous assessment" in schools these days too (seems a big push to go in this direction). I remember years ago when my brother was doing, I think it was, Construction Studies for the leaving. For this, a scale model of a local historic building was produced. My father spent quite a lot of time in the afternoons busily working away on this, with my brother looking on, with a beautiful final end product ;) I think he got an A in this eventually (not entirely due to his own efforts :) ).
 

brughahaha

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Hardly suprising a student would seek to work in an area where their parents work and can inspire them ....... I would hope that the judging process would ensure that the student can stand independently over their own work ...If so , i don't see a problem , surely Teacher /Parent input must be massive at the beginning before the students find their feet.
 

Mercurial

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I assume part of the judging involves talking to the students about their projects, and that a student who didn't put in the work themselves wouldn't be able to explain themselves.
 

flavirostris

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How does Cork always manage to scoop the Young Scientists award.
 

Analyzer

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Well done to the student.

Given how the HSE operates it will be 15 years before his suggestion is applied in the nearest hospital to the student.

Nepotism ? Let's have a panel consisting of Ryan Tubridy, Eileen Dunne and Lottoe Ryan to investigate.
 

Spirit Of Newgrange

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