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Can bicycles get Ireland out of the crisis?

Burnout

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Oct 7, 2009
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I have a life.
Cork is probably the most unsuitable city in the country for cycling because of all the hills. I used to cycle a everywhere when I was younger but used to get off my bike a lot as it was easier to walk up the hills. The north side is particularly bad.
The CFI might be interested in the notion of flattening the hills around Ireland, especially in areas like you mentioned in Co. Cork. The jobs would be very much welcome and we could get years out of the project. A winner all around.
 


TheWexfordInn

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Jul 27, 2012
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The most comfortable saddle for me is a Selle Italia Ldy. No central cutaway, though Selle does make them. I tried one (different brand) with a cutaway but it wasn't as comfortable as the Selle. If I haven't cycled for a while I am a bit sore for a couple of days, then it's fine.

The double saddle looks uncomfortable and ridiculous. Have you tried it AP?
Cutaway saddles are no good. Individuals anatomies are so different that a saddle designed to keep pressure off one bit and transfer it somewhere else instead could have the completely opposite effect on another individual with a slightly different layout down those parts. A regular saddle is a better choice, getting a wide saddle is the best option for avoiding getting pressure concentrated where its not wanted.
I've ridden with a different brand of double saddle, it definitely keeps the weight away from delicate parts but I stopped using it as I wanted to be able to ride "no hands" on occasion which was impossible with that saddle
 

GDPR

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The CFI might be interested in the notion of flattening the hills around Ireland, especially in areas like you mentioned in Co. Cork. The jobs would be very much welcome and we could get years out of the project. A winner all around.
No need to flatten the hills, just build roads/cycleways or both with the same gentle angle some French bloke used so that horses + carriage and/or heavy army stuff would not have trouble negotiating hills. Fortunately he built a lot of such roads in France and that gentle angle is why so many French people ride bikes. All the details are in a book by an English person called something like "A History of France" and rode his bike through most if not all of the French regions to do his research. If anyone is interested I'll find my copy. I'm just going out so cannot find it right now.
 

GDPR

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Cutaway saddles are no good. Individuals anatomies are so different that a saddle designed to keep pressure off one bit and transfer it somewhere else instead could have the completely opposite effect on another individual with a slightly different layout down those parts. A regular saddle is a better choice, getting a wide saddle is the best option for avoiding getting pressure concentrated where its not wanted.
I've ridden with a different brand of double saddle, it definitely keeps the weight away from delicate parts but I stopped using it as I wanted to be able to ride "no hands" on occasion which was impossible with that saddle
I like my rather narrow Selle Italia Ldy. It's only a few years old; the one it replaced (also a Selle Italia and similar shape and size) lasted a couple of decades and quite a lot of use. I did try a few wider and more cushiony seats but they were not for me. Other women must like my sort of Selle because otherwise it would not be still available for sale!

Chaçun á sa bike seat.
 

Tea Party Patriot

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There's no such thing as road tax, here or in the UK. Please google 'I pay road tax'.

How are other road users endangered by cyclists? Surely it's the other way around.
The slow speed of cyclists often causes hazards, especially when they do not pull into the margins to leave faster moving traffic pass. Also if a cyclist runs a red light, swerves in and out between cars in traffic, or endangers pedestrians on footpaths they are not easily identified and reported, they should have to have visible registration plates.
 

TheWexfordInn

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The slow speed of cyclists often causes hazards, especially when they do not pull into the margins to leave faster moving traffic pass. Also if a cyclist runs a red light, swerves in and out between cars in traffic, or endangers pedestrians on footpaths they are not easily identified and reported, they should have to have visible registration plates.
Have you any stats to indicate that cyclists pose a danger to anyone?

There have been multiple studies from around the world linked to on the http://www.politics.ie/forum/transport/163706-making-cycling-safer.html thread to support the fact that most cycle-car collisions are the drivers fault, heres the most recent report that has been posted on that thread.

Two-thirds of collisions between vehicles and cyclists in central London are the fault of the driver, research revealed today.

Westminster council found that drivers were to blame in 68 per cent of incidents while cyclists were responsible for 20 per cent. In the remainder of cases, both were to blame or the cause could not be attributed.
Drivers to blame for two-thirds of bicycle collisions in Westminster - London - News - London Evening Standard
 

GDPR

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The slow speed of cyclists often causes hazards, especially when they do not pull into the margins to leave faster moving traffic pass. Also if a cyclist runs a red light, swerves in and out between cars in traffic, or endangers pedestrians on footpaths they are not easily identified and reported, they should have to have visible registration plates.
When roads are being repaired in London there are signs when the road has become very narrow: "Drivers do not overtake cyclists". You would not like that. I think you sound very intolerant and impatient.

Most drivers I have found are very polite and courteous when I am cycling. A few months ago I was cycling down a quiet street, encountered an intersection, I had right of way. On one side a black cab gave way to me, on the other a big semi trailer. Both were going ahead, not turning into my street. They could have dashed across my road but they didn't.

Are you as polite to cyclists?


____________
[SUB]EDIT: You should go for a bike ride TPP as it engenders endorphins, something which car driving does not. Your aggression and impatience will fade away, and also you will see road usage from the other side.

Life does not have to be so rushed.:) [/SUB]
 
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Tea Party Patriot

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Have you any stats to indicate that cyclists pose a danger to anyone?

There have been multiple studies from around the world linked to on the http://www.politics.ie/forum/transport/163706-making-cycling-safer.html thread to support the fact that most cycle-car collisions are the drivers fault, heres the most recent report that has been posted on that thread.



Drivers to blame for two-thirds of bicycle collisions in Westminster - London - News - London Evening Standard
They slow down traffic and the latest fad I have seen with them is taking to narrow country roads dressed up like they are in the tour de France on the weekends. The speed limit on these roads is 80kph and have bends every few hundred yards making overtaking very dangerous, yet these cyclists don't have the common sense to pull in by the dikes and let the traffic pass forcing drivers to either tuck in behind them at 15 to 20 kph or overtake blind.
 

GDPR

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They slow down traffic and the latest fad I have seen with them is taking to narrow country roads dressed up like they are in the tour de France on the weekends. The speed limit on these roads is 80kph and have bends every few hundred yards making overtaking very dangerous, yet these cyclists don't have the common sense to pull in by the dikes and let the traffic pass forcing drivers to either tuck in behind them at 15 to 20 kph or overtake blind.
Afaik cyclists are permitted to take the full width of the lane (at least in the UK), but cautious cyclists like myself tend to give way to cars and other motor vehicles **except** when it is unsafe to do so. An unsafe instance is on a narrow, winding country road. So maybe you and similar drivers should slow down on such roads.

Cyclists have as much right to the roads as motorists do. And 80 kph for a narrow, winding country road can be far too dangerous. Just say you are driving at that speed then around the corner coming towards you is a big semitrailer, or a farm truck with a very wide load of hay, taking up too much of the narrow road? Drive more carefully and be considerate to other, slower vehicles.

A tractor could be driving even more slowly than a cyclist, but you don't complain about its lack of speed, you just accept it as a fact of life.
 
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Papillon

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Sep 21, 2012
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They slow down traffic and the latest fad I have seen with them is taking to narrow country roads dressed up like they are in the tour de France on the weekends. The speed limit on these roads is 80kph and have bends every few hundred yards making overtaking very dangerous, yet these cyclists don't have the common sense to pull in by the dikes and let the traffic pass forcing drivers to either tuck in behind them at 15 to 20 kph or overtake blind.
This is how they do narrow country roads in the Netherlands, no central line and the main 'car space' is about one and a half widths of a car. If another car approaches both cars are obliged to enter the cycle lane and give way to bikes, it forces cars to slow down and there's none of this 80kph limit on tiny roads BS over there.
Narrow Country Road in Netherlands - YouTube
 

GDPR

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This is how they do narrow country roads in the Netherlands, no central line and the main 'car space' is about one and a half widths of a car. If another car approaches both cars are obliged to enter the cycle lane and give way to bikes, it forces cars to slow down and there's none of this 80kph limit on tiny roads BS over there.
Narrow Country Road in Netherlands - YouTube
Ireland needs to bring its road rules up to date to match the sensible Dutch ones. Probably will reduce road accidents and motorists will accept that speed is not a way of life.
 

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