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Can you identify this medal?


5intheface

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Sep 4, 2008
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I have a small collection of war and commemorative medals from around the world and I am aware of the history of almost all of them.

One, however remains a mystery to me. It is all the more frustrating given that it is Irish and was found in my parents' house following their deaths a couple of years ago.

Any help with identification of the medal would be very much appreciated and any stories or anecdotes about Irish medals in the possession of other posters would also be interesting.

I think the inscription, although phrased a little oddly, is legible enough in the pic below but note that what looks like a small scratch at the bottom is actually the words 'An Iodail an Tir a deanta' in the smallest writing I have ever seen.



 


kerrynorth

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Oct 5, 2005
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Is it the War of Independence medal that all volunteers got?
 

5intheface

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Nope - nice medal though!

Contact the Bureau of Military History - they might have an angle on it.
Thanks Catalpa but I have a suspicion that it is more likely to be commemorative in nature, maybe like the Gael Linn medals that were struck a few decades ago. There are lots of sites which show military medals from Ireland and most of them are very unlike the style of this one, which has no mounting bar or clasp. Might be worth a try nevertheless.
 

spidermom

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sorry but went to catalpa's this day in history blog and what should I find but this.............................

"28 February 1973: General Election held on this day in the Republic of Ireland. As a result of which Fianna Fáil under Jack Lynch lost power. Fianna Fail (Jack Lynch) won 69 seats; Fine Gael (Liam Cosgrave) 54 seats and the Labour Party (Brendan Corish) 19 seats in Leinster House. As FF had not won an overall majority the way was open for the two Opposition Parties to form a Government. It was the first time there had been a change of Power since 1957.

Liam Cosgrave of Fine Gael was elected as Taoiseach on 14 March as head of a coalition government ‘the National Coalition’ between the Fine Gael and Labour parties. The prospective Coalition had issued a joint 14-point programme for change prior to the Election that emphasised bread and butter issues and a promise of social reform. The Arms Crises of 1970, the continuing violence in the North, had damaged Fianna Fail. The coercive legislation brought in to deal with the IRA south of the Border did nothing to strengthen their perceived ‘Republican’ credentials. The Economy was performing poorly and the heightened economic expectations of the 1960’s were not transferred into the early years of the decade. Basically though after so many years in power the people just wanted a change anyway and to give the others a chance.

Coverage of the general election by the national broadcaster RTE also saw a unique event. Jack Lynch, in an interview that night with Brian Farrell became the first Taoiseach to concede defeat live on Irish television. Although the full result was not known Lynch was certain that the transfers to other candidates would result in Fianna Fáil losing the general election."


Thanks Catalpa!

Hopefully history will repeat itself!!!
 

5intheface

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Is it the War of Independence medal that all volunteers got?
No, those and the 1971 anniversary version which I also have, are quite different, as are the 1916 and 1966 versions. No Irish medal I have seen is in any way similar.
 

Catalpa

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sorry but went to catalpa's this day in history blog and what should I find but this.............................

"28 February 1973: General Election held on this day in the Republic of Ireland. As a result of which Fianna Fáil under Jack Lynch lost power. Fianna Fail (Jack Lynch) won 69 seats; Fine Gael (Liam Cosgrave) 54 seats and the Labour Party (Brendan Corish) 19 seats in Leinster House. As FF had not won an overall majority the way was open for the two Opposition Parties to form a Government. It was the first time there had been a change of Power since 1957.

Liam Cosgrave of Fine Gael was elected as Taoiseach on 14 March as head of a coalition government ‘the National Coalition’ between the Fine Gael and Labour parties. The prospective Coalition had issued a joint 14-point programme for change prior to the Election that emphasised bread and butter issues and a promise of social reform. The Arms Crises of 1970, the continuing violence in the North, had damaged Fianna Fail. The coercive legislation brought in to deal with the IRA south of the Border did nothing to strengthen their perceived ‘Republican’ credentials. The Economy was performing poorly and the heightened economic expectations of the 1960’s were not transferred into the early years of the decade. Basically though after so many years in power the people just wanted a change anyway and to give the others a chance.

Coverage of the general election by the national broadcaster RTE also saw a unique event. Jack Lynch, in an interview that night with Brian Farrell became the first Taoiseach to concede defeat live on Irish television. Although the full result was not known Lynch was certain that the transfers to other candidates would result in Fianna Fáil losing the general election."


Thanks Catalpa!

Hopefully history will repeat itself!!!
Yeah I wonder if Brian was aware of this as he took the podium tonight.

28 February is not a good day in FFs history book!
 

spidermom

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Potentially it could be a commemorative medal that were handed out in 1966 (or earlier) on the 50th Anniversary of the rising, something tells me though it could be from a lot earlier as there was a capturing of history project on the Rising and War of Indpendence with the records held with Govt records.
 

5intheface

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Potentially it could be a commemorative medal that were handed out in 1966 (or earlier) on the 50th Anniversary of the rising, something tells me though it could be from a lot earlier as there was a capturing of history project on the Rising and War of Indpendence with the records held with Govt records.
I have a poor knowledge of Gaeilge but does that form of 'made in Italy' seem archaic compared to 'deanta i' or are the two still fairly common.
 

Gabha Óir

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I have a small collection of war and commemorative medals from around the world and I am aware of the history of almost all of them.

One, however remains a mystery to me. It is all the more frustrating given that it is Irish and was found in my parents' house following their deaths a couple of years ago.

Any help with identification of the medal would be very much appreciated and any stories or anecdotes about Irish medals in the possession of other posters would also be interesting.

I think the inscription, although phrased a little oddly, is legible enough in the pic below but note that what looks like a small scratch at the bottom is actually the words 'An Iodail an Tir a deanta' in the smallest writing I have ever seen.



'An Iodail an Tir a deanta' - That means made in the country of Italy but you probably knew that
 

5intheface

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Sep 4, 2008
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Google Afbeeldingen resultaat voor http://www.simmonsgallery.co.uk/2001site/medals/MB37/thumbs-20th-c-medals/t045a.JPG

Its not the exact medal but as a commeorative medal for PH Pearse struck in Italy it may be a useful reference or lead. Buachaill by the name P. Vincze struck it. Wonder if there is a connection with yours. Best of luck

Very interesting and a lead I will follow up. Also happened to see the estimates alongside the other ones...ker ker kerching. :D
 

5intheface

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The more typical design of 1916 and WOI medals


 

5intheface

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My cousin has my Grandad's War of Independence medals - I hate him!
My cousin in Philadelphia has my Great Uncle's 'dead man's penny' from Gallipoli, God love her. Worse than that, my wife's family donated her Great Great Granfather's VC from Rorke's Drift to the Regimental Museum in Monmouth...doh. This is he,


 
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My cousin in Philadelphia has my Great Uncle's 'dead man's penny' from Gallipoli, God love her. Worse than that, my wife's family donated her Great Great Granfather's VC from Rorke's Drift to the Regimental Museum in Monmouth...doh. This is he,


What a fantastic family history! I only have the Grandad (and two great-uncles) in the IRA, but my mum's second cousin was Governor of Massachussetts before JFK, and another was Mayor of Chicago in the 20s and took on Al Capone...
 

5intheface

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, and another was Mayor of Chicago in the 20s and took on Al Capone...
A Donegal man I assume? I wonder if he knew his fellow county-man and notorious NY hitman Vincent 'Mad Dog Coll?

Mad Dog Coll - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The parents of the McErlanes who were senior crime bosses in Chicago at that time hailed from this corner of the world and were related to my aunt but no blood relation of my own.

Frank McErlane - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
Joined
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A Donegal man I assume? I wonder if he knew his fellow county-man and notorious NY hitman Vincent 'Mad Dog Coll?

Mad Dog Coll - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The parents of the McErlanes who were senior crime bosses in Chicago at that time hailed from this corner of the world and were related to my aunt but no blood relation of my own.

Frank McErlane - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Donegal parents, I understand. His name was William E. Dever. He had some success taking on Capone, but was ultimately unseated as Mayor by a Capone crony. No gangsters in my family, Im afraid (though my grandad ended up in prison at the Curragh during the Civil War). The cousin who was Governor of Massachussetts, Paul A. Dever, actually came to visit my mum's school in Urris in the late 40s, my mum and my aunts were called to meet him...
 

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