Can't hear mumbling film actors? Critics need to criticise unprofessional mumbling.

Patslatt1

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English film and TV actors decades ago had great vocal skills and spoke with great clarity thanks to their long apprenticeships in repertory theatres throughout England. Unfortunately,the decline of repertory has undermined these skills.
A generation ago,mumbling speech or seeming to mumble in films started to become popular because this seemed natural. Some American actors seem to mumble but still can be understood.
In recent years, it is getting hard to understand a lot of the speech in many films. A recent example is the highly rated American film "Booksmart". The critics who rated it must have very good hearing or be wearing hearing aids. Old people who have suffered some hearing loss should avoid it, as should many young people whose hearing has been damaged in loud discos, especially basement discos.
If this mumbling keeps up, critics should introduce a rating for clarity of speech or a warning symbol for those with less than perfect hearing, say an ear icon with an X on it.
 


Cdebru

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English film and TV actors decades ago had great vocal skills and spoke with great clarity thanks to their long apprenticeships in repertory theatres throughout England. Unfortunately,the decline of repertory has undermined these skills.
A generation ago,mumbling speech or seeming to mumble in films started to become popular because this seemed natural. Some American actors seem to mumble but still can be understood.
In recent years, it is getting hard to understand a lot of the speech in many films. A recent example is the highly rated American film "Booksmart". The critics who rated it must have very good hearing or be wearing hearing aids. Old people who have suffered some hearing loss should avoid it, as should many young people whose hearing has been damaged in loud discos, especially basement discos.
If this mumbling keeps up, critics should introduce a rating for clarity of speech or a warning symbol for those with less than perfect hearing, say an ear icon with an X on it.
Wow I thought your other threads were sh!te.
 

AhNowStop

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English film and TV actors decades ago had great vocal skills and spoke with great clarity thanks to their long apprenticeships in repertory theatres throughout England. Unfortunately,the decline of repertory has undermined these skills.
A generation ago,mumbling speech or seeming to mumble in films started to become popular because this seemed natural. Some American actors seem to mumble but still can be understood.
In recent years, it is getting hard to understand a lot of the speech in many films. A recent example is the highly rated American film "Booksmart". The critics who rated it must have very good hearing or be wearing hearing aids. Old people who have suffered some hearing loss should avoid it, as should many young people whose hearing has been damaged in loud discos, especially basement discos.
If this mumbling keeps up, critics should introduce a rating for clarity of speech or a warning symbol for those with less than perfect hearing, say an ear icon with an X on it.
feck I thought that was just me going mut n jeff ... I often have to put the bloody subtitles on :rolleyes:

thank God Im not alone anymore :oops:;) lol
 

Buchaill Dana

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The basement discos are the worst
 

silverharp

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you are going deaf old man
 

Degeneration X

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English film and TV actors decades ago had great vocal skills and spoke with great clarity thanks to their long apprenticeships in repertory theatres throughout England. Unfortunately,the decline of repertory has undermined these skills.
A generation ago,mumbling speech or seeming to mumble in films started to become popular because this seemed natural. Some American actors seem to mumble but still can be understood.
In recent years, it is getting hard to understand a lot of the speech in many films. A recent example is the highly rated American film "Booksmart". The critics who rated it must have very good hearing or be wearing hearing aids. Old people who have suffered some hearing loss should avoid it, as should many young people whose hearing has been damaged in loud discos, especially basement discos.
If this mumbling keeps up, critics should introduce a rating for clarity of speech or a warning symbol for those with less than perfect hearing, say an ear icon with an X on it.
Eh, critics have been commentating on this issue for years!


Have you been living under a rock or something?

Also I could hear everything in Booksmart (which is a bit overrated by the way) fine, I think you might need to get your ears tested or the sound system in your cinema was pretty faulty.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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Could be a sign of loss of hearing alright. Shouldn't be a problem in a cinema as I'm slightly hard of hearing on one side and began to dread cinemas when some lunatic pressed the central button to take all cinemas up to volume 11.

On the rare occasion I do go now mostly it is to play with the comfy chair and its controls anyway. That's easily worth 12 quid right there.

Always bring earplugs as well as I've found the volume levels tortuous some years back.

I have noticed that some programmes in the past have been particularly poor in terms of sound quality. Some detective series seem to hanker for the film noir approach and you get mumbling AND dead screen darkness a lot. Not sure if it is meant to be arty but if you can neither see the characters nor make out more than half sentences from an actor that is a set of major technical deficiencies in the programme.
 

Patslatt1

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Eh, critics have been commentating on this issue for years!


Have you been living under a rock or something?

Also I could hear everything in Booksmart (which is a bit overrated by the way) fine, I think you might need to get your ears tested or the sound system in your cinema was pretty faulty.
Cineworld multiplex in Dublin has good sound systems.
I have no problem hearing speech on radio which has to rely on the human voice.
 

brigg

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Radio productions are supposed to have maximum audio clarity. There is no lip reading and no subtitles available.
If a TV/film performance is intended to be natural, real and gritty, then mumbling is fine. It can make a character memorable. Subtitles are your friend.
In real life people don't over pronounce every syllable like in a camp musical or pantomime for children.
 


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