Catholic fascist party

lapsedmethodist

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Listening to Pat Kenny the other day on holiday, I heard a fascinating piece about a Catholic Fascist Party of the '30's-'40's in Ireland. It was called Ailthíri na hAiséirge and it had up to 22 elected members. It had the backing of all Irelands anti-semites like Ernest Blythe and Oliver J.
The book about it is called " Architects of the Resurrection ...Ailtíri na hAiséirge and the Fascist New Order in Ireland" by Ray M. Douglas.

This is the first time I've ever heard of this outfit. Why ? Are people embarasssed?
With 22 elected members it must have had a large following.... presumably the fathers and mothers of this generation of posters on P.ie must have either known or even voted for them!!
Who knew?!
 


The Caped Cod

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Was this O'Duffy's crowd? The organisation that recruited men to go and fight for Franco.
 

peader odonnell

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its news to me that it had 22 elected members ,thought it had none ,the party literature sold in its hundreds of thousands but the party became extinct in a short time.
 

Didimus

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its news to me that it had 22 elected members ,thought it had none ,the party literature sold in its hundreds of thousands but the party became extinct in a short time.
Elected to what might be the question - councils, corporations, maybe? Fairly sure not Dail. Interested to learn more.
 

peader odonnell

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Was this O'Duffy's crowd? The organisation that recruited men to go and fight for Franco.
its leader was Gearoid OCuinnegain ,an out an out Fascist ,I believe ODuffy was dead by then. Its paper limped on an was on sale in Dublin in the seventies ,a totally fascist rag.
 

Didimus

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Got this description of the book from ehm.. the tesco website!
About the book
In the early 1940s many people in Ireland expected Nazi Germany to win the Second World War. According to secret Irish government assessments, most wanted her to. After the fall of France and with Britain trembling on the brink of defeat, democracy seemed likely to disappear from Europe. But if this happened, how should newly-independent Ireland - a country that had remained neutral in the war - respond to what appeared to be an emerging post-democratic world order? Gearoid Cuinneagain, a young pro-Axis activist, had an answer. In 1942 he founded Ailtiri na hAiseirghe ('Architects of the Resurrection'), a fascist movement that aimed to destroy the infant Irish democracy and replace it with a one-party totalitarian state. But Ailtiri na hAiseirghe was no Nazi imitator. Rather, it aimed at something far more ambitious: the fusion of totalitarianism and Christianity that would make Ireland a 'missionary-ideological state' wielding global influence in the postwar era. Supported by idealistic youths and mainstream politicians like Ernest Blythe, Oliver J. Flanagan and Dan Breen - and scrutinized anxiously by British and American intelligence - Aiseirghe won several seats in the 1945 local government elections. But a devastating split, just as it seemed poised to make a political breakthrough, reversed its fortunes and put an end to Cuinneagain's once-promising career as a would-be Irish fuhrer. Architects of the Resurrection casts an uncomfortable light on the popularity of anti-democratic, anti-Semitic and extremist ideas in wartime Ireland. Students of Irish history and of comparative fascism will find many new insights in this book.
 

Didimus

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More info here Ailtirí na h-Aiséirí [Archive] - Irish Nationalism
Seems TG4 did documentaryon this.
Also seems that Sean South of Garryowen fame was also a supporter.
Party slogan - We need a Salazar!
Indeed. It must be progress that the only Portugese person to evoke such emotion today was recently interviewed about his cosmetic regime.
 

The Caped Cod

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Yet another skeleton from our wartime closet. Why do we never learn any of this in school?
 

fergalr

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It had the backing of all Irelands anti-semites like Ernest Blythe and Oliver J.
Ernest Blythe strikes me as one of the tragic losses of the early history of our State; along with Michael Collins. Both fiscally conservative, well educated men - what a pity one died so young and one became a fellow traveller of Irish pseudo-fascism.

This is the first time I've ever heard of this outfit. Why ? Are people embarasssed?
With 22 elected members it must have had a large following....
I'm sorry? With how many hundreds of elected seats across the country back then, how could twenty-two be considered a "large following"? Ireland proved itself absolutely immune to fascism as an ideology. Probably in large part due to the Catholic Church making sure it had no competitors for the nation's hearts and minds. The history of the Church in pre-WWII Europe is very interesting. The divide between the tenacious democratic drive of the German Centre Party on the one hand and the willing subservience to National Socialism on the other of many formerly Catholic political elites, especially in Eastern Europe, proves how broad a Church it was then - let alone now. And this is without mentioning Pius XII, Eugene Pacelli; the most dubious pope of modern times. But we've all read Hitler's Pope.
 
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Listening to Pat Kenny the other day on holiday, I heard a fascinating piece about a Catholic Fascist Party of the '30's-'40's in Ireland. It was called Ailthíri na hAiséirge and it had up to 22 elected members. It had the backing of all Irelands anti-semites like Ernest Blythe and Oliver J.
The book about it is called " Architects of the Resurrection ...Ailtíri na hAiséirge and the Fascist New Order in Ireland" by Ray M. Douglas.

This is the first time I've ever heard of this outfit. Why ? Are people embarasssed?
With 22 elected members it must have had a large following.... presumably the fathers and mothers of this generation of posters on P.ie must have either known or even voted for them!!
Who knew?!
What day was it on?
 

spidermom

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Listening to Pat Kenny the other day on holiday, I heard a fascinating piece about a Catholic Fascist Party of the '30's-'40's in Ireland. It was called Ailthíri na hAiséirge and it had up to 22 elected members. It had the backing of all Irelands anti-semites like Ernest Blythe and Oliver J.
The book about it is called " Architects of the Resurrection ...Ailtíri na hAiséirge and the Fascist New Order in Ireland" by Ray M. Douglas.

This is the first time I've ever heard of this outfit. Why ? Are people embarasssed?
With 22 elected members it must have had a large following.... presumably the fathers and mothers of this generation of posters on P.ie must have either known or even voted for them!!
Who knew?!

Interesting interview with the author alright...wonder if we were the only nation who dabbled in Facism at this point in History though....probably not
 

Didimus

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Interesting interview with the author alright...wonder if we were the only nation who dabbled in Facism at this point in History though....probably not
Actually it is probably fair to say that at this point in history only dabbling in Fascism is probably worth a star in our copybook.

It was a confused time though. Sean South was a member of a small right wing catholic group Maria Duce, which regarded the IRA as a communist organisation.
 
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Wednesday 29th July
Try this link to the programme- you'll have to skip through it - don't know when it was on
RTÉ.ie Radio1: Today with Pat Kenny
(link half way down on right)
Grand. Thanks for that. Fast forward to around 1hr 30, that's when the interview starts. Very Interesting I'll get that over the weekend.
 

TommyO'Brien

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Interesting interview with the author alright...wonder if we were the only nation who dabbled in Facism at this point in History though....probably not
Even America did.
 

fergalr

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Actually it is probably fair to say that at this point in history only dabbling in Fascism is probably worth a star in our copybook.
That's such a great quote :D But then again we were an isolated nation. If we were in the position of other small democracies like Belgium or the Netherlands or Denmark, how would we have behaved? I'd like to think with the courage of the Danes - especially the Danish king. In a way, maybe it's for the best we don't know.
 

lapsedmethodist

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They say Danny the Red came to Derry in '69, took one look and f'd off again. I've always believed that a lot of what is posited as republicanism is little other than Catholic nationalism and this book seems to support me. Those of us who drank in the Forresters Club on the Falls in the late '60's were natural protestant republicans, but the hard liners who emerged later- to become PIRA - made it clear that there was no place for us. Some, like Bunting were so off the wall that they hung in there but most just shrugged and left the place altogether.
SF's on-message modus operandi is far too close to a form of fascism to be ignored imho.
 

Thoreau

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This is the first time I've ever heard of this outfit. Why ? Are people embarasssed?
With 22 elected members it must have had a large following.... presumably the fathers and mothers of this generation of posters on P.ie must have either known or even voted for them!!
Who knew?!
Nobody! Absolutely nobody!

Of course, it does get an entry all to itself in Hickey and Doherty's 'New Dictionary of Irish History', and I see Dermot Keogh mentions it in his dull but worthy 'Twentieth-Century Ireland: Nation and State', and Clair Wills devotes about five pages to it in her excellent 'That Neutral Island', and Proinsias Mac Aonghusa details its emergence from Craobh na hAiséirí in his unfailingly accurate 'Ar Son na Gaeilge: Conradh na Gaeilge 1893-1993', etc. etc.

But apart from books dealing with the 1940s, it is true one hardly ever sees it referred to these days. It has to be some sort of conspiracy surely?

That's probably why the glimmer man has been airbrushed from history too. And the LDF. And Jammet's restaurant. And Lemon's boiled sweets. And compulsory tillage. And the Blue Hussars.

Clearly, somebody, somewhere, has a lot to hide.
 

Lao-Tse

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Even America did.
Father Coughlin, Gerald Winrod, and of course the KKK.
The current issue of History Ireland has a piece on Aiséirghe,
and Tommy Graham points out, it raises disturbing questions
about the anti-democratic nature of both British rule in Ireland
and the Irish Free State.

Interesting question, though-would Aiséirghe have anything
in common with other post-WII ultra-conservatives? I'm thinking
of the Poujadist movement in France,for instance.
 


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