China ready to 'cast loose' North Korea: Wikileaks

antiestablishmentarian

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The tensions in the region will be ratcheted up another notch after a wikileaks cable apparently revealed that China is ready to cast Kim's régime loose. It's certainly an interesting story, but it needs to be taken with some caution- after all, this seems to be a leak from a South Korean source and as such is not from a disinterested party. If true though it's a game changer. As all of this was known beforehand by the US, it's not surprising that they don't seem overly worried about the rise in tensions that will result from their latest military exercises in the Yellow Sea and that South Korea has been far more bellicose in its rhetoric towards the North recently than on previous occasions following clashes and provocations. I think we're witnessing the start of a concerted turning of the screws on the DPRK with the aim of bringing about its political disintegration and final collapse and integration into the ROK.

Chun, who has since been appointed national security adviser to South Korea's president, said North Korea had already collapsed economically.

Political collapse would ensue once Kim Jong-il died, despite the dictator's efforts to obtain Chinese help and to secure the succession for his son, Kim Jong-un.

"Citing private conversations during previous sessions of the six-party talks , Chun claimed [the two high-level officials] believed Korea should be unified under ROK [South Korea] control," Stephens reported.

"The two officials, Chun said, were ready to 'face the new reality' that the DPRK [North Korea] now had little value to China as a buffer state – a view that, since North Korea's first nuclear test in 2006, had reportedly gained traction among senior PRC [People's Republic of China] leaders. Chun argued that in the event of a North Korean collapse, China would clearly 'not welcome' any US military presence north of the DMZ [demilitarised zone]. Again citing his conversations with [the officials], Chun said the PRC would be comfortable with a reunified Korea controlled by Seoul and anchored to the US in a 'benign alliance' – as long as Korea was not hostile towards China. Tremendous trade and labour-export opportunities for Chinese companies, Chun said, would also help 'salve' PRC concerns about … a reunified Korea.

"Chun dismissed the prospect of a possible PRC military intervention in the event of a DPRK collapse, noting that China's strategic economic interests now lie with the United States, Japan and South Korea – not North Korea."
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010...eunified-korea
 


Cael

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Well, the DPRK has nukes now, so it isnt really afraid of US military attack. As for financial co-operation from China, Im sure the Chinese will buy anything if the get it cheap enough, and sell anything if they get a high enough price.
 

Cato

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Well, the DPRK has nukes now, so it isnt really afraid of US military attack. As for financial co-operation from China, Im sure the Chinese will buy anything if the get it cheap enough, and sell anything if they get a high enough price.
Hmm... I wonder if it will actually be the Chinese who attack North Korea in order to bring 'stability' to the region (and to their trade). The Chinese are not going to tolerate a war between a small insignificant neighbour (relative to itself) and its largest trade partner and debtor.
 

SevenStars

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Old news.

The Chinese havent exactly been best mates the DPRK for a long time.
 

Harmonica

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I think China would probably step aside in the extreme scenario of NK - US war. They have more to gain by US economic partnership than anything NK can offer. Obviously they don't want that to happen but NK is a failed state - its only hope is to take China as an example of economic development.
 

Cael

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I think China would probably step aside in the extreme scenario of NK - US war. They have more to gain by US economic partnership than anything NK can offer. Obviously they don't want that to happen but NK is a failed state - its only hope is to take China as an example of economic development.

The USA is more of a failed state than the DPRK is.
 

SevenStars

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I think China would probably step aside in the extreme scenario of NK - US war. They have more to gain by US economic partnership than anything NK can offer. Obviously they don't want that to happen but NK is a failed state - its only hope is to take China as an example of economic development.
You mean turn large parts of their economy into a sweat shop for Imperialism?

No thanks. The Koreans will go down fighting.
 

antiestablishmentarian

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Old news.

The Chinese havent exactly been best mates the DPRK for a long time.
Aye, but it would explain why the US/ROK reaction to the latest incident has been far more belligerent than their reaction to other recent events: its not as if there haven't been more serious clashes in the past such as the mini Naval War at the end of the 1990s but the response this time is far more aggressive. The intimation that China would step in with aid to prop up the régime in the event of a conflict has been one of the key deterrents (they don't give a sh*t about nukes being dropped on Seoul) to a further squeezing of the North.
 

SevenStars

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Hmm... I wonder if it will actually be the Chinese who attack North Korea in order to bring 'stability' to the region (and to their trade). The Chinese are not going to tolerate a war between a small insignificant neighbour (relative to itself) and its largest trade partner and debtor.
Its what this means for internal Chinese politics that is worrying.

This probably signals the beginning of a crack down on the so-called "New" Left in China (wiki gives a very limited outline Chinese New Left - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia ) and working class resistance there in general. The DPRK is an inspiration to many people in China.
 

Cael

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Aye, but it would explain why the US/ROK reaction to the latest incident has been far more belligerent than their reaction to other recent events: its not as if there haven't been more serious clashes in the past such as the mini Naval War at the end of the 1990s but the response this time is far more aggressive. The intimation that China would step in with aid to prop up the régime in the event of a conflict has been one of the key deterrents (they don't give a sh*t about nukes being dropped on Seoul) to a further squeezing of the North.
The US is bankrupt. They would love to attack Iran, but they just dont have the money to do it. There is no question of them attacking the DPRK. They just make noises like a castrated old dog.
 

Cael

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Its what this means for internal Chinese politics that is worrying.

This probably signals the beginning of a crack down on the so-called "New" Left in China (wiki gives a very limited outline Chinese New Left - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia ) and working class resistance there in general. The DPRK is an inspiration to many people in China.
This really says it all about the capitalist lapdogs in Beijing:

On December 24, 2004, four Chinese protesters were sentenced to three-year prison terms for distributing leaflets entitled "Mao Forever Our Leader" at a gathering in Zhengzhou honoring Mao Zedong on the anniversary of his birth.
 

dominodancer

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Sticky Bingo...

Look like the Workers Party will then have to take up bingo if Mr. Stenson is to be able to keep paying the fees to Jesuit Belvedere (alma mater of Sir Anto) for the education of the fruit of his loins. The superdollars will obviously have dried up once North Korea goes up in a mushroom cloud.
 

Cael

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Look like the Workers Party will then have to take up bingo if Mr. Stenson is to be able to keep paying the fees to Jesuit Belvedere (alma mater of Sir Anto) for the education of the fruit of his loins. The superdollars will obviously have dried up once North Korea goes up in a mushroom cloud.
Sure, they can always get a few trillion of the Feds Monopoly money instead.
 

antiestablishmentarian

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The US is bankrupt. They would love to attack Iran, but they just dont have the money to do it. There is no question of them attacking the DPRK. They just make noises like a castrated old dog.
They still maintain troops on the Korean peninsula and in any case the ROK army would be their cannon fodder in the event of war: they have sufficient troops and the US would just supply them with surplus weaponry and some naval support.
 

Cael

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They still maintain troops on the Korean peninsula and in any case the ROK army would be their cannon fodder in the event of war: they have sufficient troops and the US would just supply them with surplus weaponry and some naval support.
Forget it. Its not going to happen.
 
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"China would clearly 'not welcome' any US military presence north of the DMZ [demilitarised zone]. .... the PRC would be comfortable with a reunified Korea controlled by Seoul and anchored to the US in a 'benign alliance' – as long as Korea was not hostile towards China."

Amazing [/sarcasm]. I have long suspected this. This is about as much news to me as Berlusconi's vanity.

There is a big difference between Korea reunifying (more or less peacefully) under Southern leadership, and a US invasion of North Korea.
 

Cael

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How else can the KIM Dynasty save the state & keep the people under control? Beg for food aid from failed Western states?
The DPRK doesnt need any food aid. Unlike Ireland, its economy is improving all the time.
 

Superindigoman

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Not been soft here but when ever i hear "North Korea" i think first of the people there, you gotta pity them, many people in the world have it very bad but most still have some control over there lives and can do little things to try and make it better, basically there is always a little hope there, but the NK people, pity them, imagine the shock if the border was opened and they went to Seoul for example, they will realise there whole lives were a complete lie, tough
 

new jewell

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I dont think the yanks have the resources to waste on such an escapade.N Korea pose no threat in the region.Chavez and south american politics are more of a threat.This is all posturing and more same old scare tactics.The yanks just scare their own population in order to control them.The government creates multiple enemies to distract attention from themselves.We're all in this together type of crap.
 


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