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Christoper Hitchens analyses the week Brits (and Westbrits) lost their marbles. The Diana Mourning.


Truth.ie

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Christoper Hitchens analyses the week Brits (and Westbrits) lost their marbles. The Diana Mourning.

This is a fantastic documentary, examination of human behaviour, and modern celebrity culture.
I missed this when on the TV and just watched it today.
Do watch it if you enjoy counter culture. Hitchens as ever is excellent.
I was flabbergasted that week, by the sheer, over the top, behaviour of Brits to the extent I actually missed the old "stiff upper lip", anal Brits.
Dubs (mostly middleaged housewives and extremist Indo readers) also got on the the bandwagon, and queued to leave bouqeuts outside the British Embassy.
AFAIR. the Flag in Leinster House was at half mast.
The fact that Mother Teresa died days earlier and only received some tepid, mediocre feigned mourning in Dublin was noted.
The documentary mentions the extreme censoring of any opinion that ran counter to the New Labour media circus.

Noel Gallagher summed up the hysteria succintly when he suggested that the tens of thousands who travelled miles to mourn for Diana, probably hadn't visited their own Gran's grave for over a decade.

For those not young enough to remember, watch and learn how the media can control the masses.

Christopher Hitchens - Diana The Mourning After [1998] - YouTube
 

parentheses

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This is a fantastic documentary, examination of human behaviour, and modern celebrity culture.
I missed this when on the TV and just watched it today.
Do watch it if you enjoy counter culture. Hitchens as ever is excellent.
I was flabbergasted that week, by the sheer, over the top, behaviour of Brits to the extent I actually missed the old "stiff upper lip", anal Brits.
Dubs (mostly middleaged housewives and extremist Indo readers) also got on the the bandwagon, and queued to leave bouqeuts outside the British Embassy.
AFAIR. the Flag in Leinster House was at half mast.
The fact that Mother Teresa died days earlier and only received some tepid, mediocre feigned mourning in Dublin was noted.
The documentary mentions the extreme censoring of any opinion that ran counter to the New Labour media circus.

Noel Gallagher summed up the hysteria succintly when he suggested that the tens of thousands who travelled miles to mourn for Diana, probably hadn't visited their own Gran's grave for over a decade.

For those not young enough to remember, watch and learn how the media can control the masses.

Christopher Hitchens - Diana The Mourning After [1998] - YouTube
The Queen didn't lose her marbles over Diana.

She was dry-eyed all that week.
 

Kev408

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I remember Sky News getting caught homing their microphones in on anyone crying.
 

Truth.ie

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I remember coming home from a disco in Donegal in the early hours and hearing the news on the bus radio.
We just had to break the news to the Brit squaddies in the Army sangar near our street.
 
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Ah yes, I remember the 'grief police'. People actually got punched in the face for not grieving hard enough.

I had the sincere good fortune to be in Sligo and Donegal that week, rather than home in London. Yet even two aunts of mine went to their local town hall to sign books of condolences for a woman they had never met and who would not have spat on them on fire. "Ah but, she wasn't one of them," they would bleat, "she was a victim", making me want to vomit. I repeated five words over and over and over again that week - 'But you didn't know her..."
 

Hitch 22

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We had a similar phenomenon in Ireland in February 2003 when 100,000+ people marched through the streets of Dublin in OPPOSITION to the overthrow of the genocidal fascist dictator Saddam Hussein. Millions joined them on the streets of other cities.
After the fall of Baghdad the protests evaporated.
Only a few hundred people turned out for an anti-war protest in Dublin a matter of weeks after some of the biggest protests in the history of the state.
For the next few years only a handful of crusties hanging around the GPO or the Bank of Ireland and a few plane spotters at Shannon was what the anti-war movement amounted to.
By 2011 the US President Barack Obama who stuck to the Bush plan for withdrawal from Iraq leaving behind as planned pro-US regime in Iraq had escalated the use of drones in Afghanistan a policy which had horrified Bush opponents years before.
What happened when he came to Ireland for a few hours that year?
The streets of Dublin were thronged with cheering Irish people probably many of the same people who a few short years before were protesting military action!:lol:
 

cb1979

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Ah yes, I remember the 'grief police'. People actually got punched in the face for not grieving hard enough.

I had the sincere good fortune to be in Sligo and Donegal that week, rather than home in London. Yet even two aunts of mine went to their local town hall to sign books of condolences for a woman they had never met and who would not have spat on them on fire. "Ah but, she wasn't one of them," they would bleat, "she was a victim", making me want to vomit. I repeated five words over and over and over again that week - 'But you didn't know her..."
It was an utterly bizarre period. I had a long argument with a friend of mine over whether the tricolour was flown at half mast on the day of the funeral. I contended it was and it took a little while digging on the internet to get the proof. I was working in town that day and I remember on my lunch break myself and the rest of the lads staring at the national flag at half mast in utter bewilderment. The day of the funeral MTV broadcast a still picture of Diana all day long. Even in Dublin, I saw grown women burst into tears when candle in the wind would come on over the tannoy in a shop.
 

dresden8

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People love being part of something.

Football fans are the nuttiest of all.
 

Nermal

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The fact that Mother Teresa died days earlier and only received some tepid, mediocre feigned mourning in Dublin was noted.
A dance rather than mourning was appropriate when that ghoul shuffled off - Hitchens would agree.

I do hope any Irish person who expressed anything other than mild indifference at this event cringes at the memory.
 

Grey Area

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Hitch nailed it with Diana as he did with Mother Teresa!
 

human 19

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Remember our own national mass stupidity?
I was mortified at the time.

[video=youtube;kZjM83wZmWw]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kZjM83wZmWw[/video]
 

Dadaist

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We had a similar phenomenon in Ireland in February 2003 when 100,000+ people marched through the streets of Dublin in OPPOSITION to the overthrow of the genocidal fascist dictator Saddam Hussein. Millions joined them on the streets of other cities.
After the fall of Baghdad the protests evaporated.
Only a few hundred people turned out for an anti-war protest in Dublin a matter of weeks after some of the biggest protests in the history of the state.
For the next few years only a handful of crusties hanging around the GPO or the Bank of Ireland and a few plane spotters at Shannon was what the anti-war movement amounted to.
By 2011 the US President Barack Obama who stuck to the Bush plan for withdrawal from Iraq leaving behind as planned pro-US regime in Iraq had escalated the use of drones in Afghanistan a policy which had horrified Bush opponents years before.
What happened when he came to Ireland for a few hours that year?
The streets of Dublin were thronged with cheering Irish people probably many of the same people who a few short years before were protesting military action!:lol:
But did he lie about it all?
 

Roman Emperor

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People love being part of something.

Football fans are the nuttiest of all.
I'm inclined to agree with you there. Certainly,a lot of Irish people who support British football teams are in serious need of professional help,in my opinion.
 

tinyd

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It was an utterly bizarre period. I had a long argument with a friend of mine over whether the tricolour was flown at half mast on the day of the funeral. I contended it was and it took a little while digging on the internet to get the proof. I was working in town that day and I remember on my lunch break myself and the rest of the lads staring at the national flag at half mast in utter bewilderment.
I have a strong recollection of even Gerry Adams commenting on her death. I don't think he was too effusive, but it was something along the lines of "she meant a lot to a lot of people".

Even in Dublin, I saw grown women burst into tears when candle in the wind would come on over the tannoy in a shop.
That's funny, I have a similar reaction whenever I hear that song, possibly for a different reason :)
 

former wesleyan

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It gave the working classes of England and Ireland a new word...." devastated ".

How's the budgie ?

It died !

Ah Jasus ye must be devastated !!
 

paddyrebel

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Remember our own national mass stupidity?
I was mortified at the time.

[video=youtube;kZjM83wZmWw]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kZjM83wZmWw[/video]
theres something of the johnny foreigner about catholics!
 

Truth.ie

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Ah yes, I remember the 'grief police'. People actually got punched in the face for not grieving hard enough.

I had the sincere good fortune to be in Sligo and Donegal that week, rather than home in London. Yet even two aunts of mine went to their local town hall to sign books of condolences for a woman they had never met and who would not have spat on them on fire. "Ah but, she wasn't one of them," they would bleat, "she was a victim", making me want to vomit. I repeated five words over and over and over again that week - 'But you didn't know her..."
Yes, my English cousin got a black eye in a pub for saying "f#ck her. The slag"......or words to that effect.
 
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