Church ban on cousin marriage created culture of individualism in Europe

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So scientific researchers have put forward a theory that a Ban on cousin marriage enforced by the medieval Catholic Church had profound effects on Europe. Prior to that time, Europeans tended to be clannish and tribal. People tended to marry within the clan or tribe, this often meant marrying close cousins. The result was that people were inbred to a high degree. People living in clans were fiercely loyal to the clan and tended to distrust outsiders.

By enforcing a ban on cousin marriage, people had to search further afield for marriage partners. Over time, the decline of clannishness led to people becoming more individualistic and more trusting of outsiders. This led to increased co-operativeness and an increase of prosperity.
 


blinding

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So scientific researchers have put forward a theory that a Ban on cousin marriage enforced by the medieval Catholic Church had profound effects on Europe. Prior to that time, Europeans tended to be clannish and tribal. People tended to marry within the clan or tribe, this often meant marrying close cousins. The result was that people were inbred to a high degree. People living in clans were fiercely loyal to the clan and tended to distrust outsiders.

By enforcing a ban on cousin marriage, people had to search further afield for marriage partners. Over time, the decline of clannishness led to people becoming more individualistic and more trusting of outsiders. This led to increased co-operativeness and an increase of prosperity.
Interesting and there may well be something in it .

How does the marrying cousins go down in other religions ? Islam for example ?
 

Kevin Parlon

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Interesting and there may well be something in it .

How does the marrying cousins go down in other religions ? Islam for example ?
Islam has no specific prohibition on consanguinity. However, it would only be fair to point out that consanguinity considerably predates Islam. Given the founder of that religion came from an extremely tribal region and the fact that he made it all up himself this should surprise no one. I'd like to learn more about the reasoning behind the medieval church's move against it.
 

Kevin Parlon

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Too much of that consanguinity don’t seem to good when you see the carry on of one group in Ireland that do a lot of it .
It has gotten so bad in the UK that the Pakistani community which is responsible for 3% of all births is responsible for 30% of all genetic abnormalities. This number doesn't take into account the reduction in IQ that is also synonymous with cousin marriage. It's a cultural meme whose every wider impact on society is negative. Should be banned given the effect on the greater good.
 

JacquesHughes

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Pope Alexander III, r 1159 to 1181 ( who practiced a type of muscular Christianity- launched papal support for the extremely dubious 'northern crusades') also had a tender side, and ( can't find an exact reference) and instructed that couples marrying must do so for love, and give their own free will.

I've thought that particular demand, not always respected of course, has made a huge contribution to the character of 'the west', contributing to female autonomy, the values of courtly love, Shakespeare romantic plays, Pride and Prejudice, Mills and Boon etc, and quite possibly, genetic health.

( I can't explain what happened in Texas)
 

Degeneration X

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So scientific researchers have put forward a theory that a Ban on cousin marriage enforced by the medieval Catholic Church had profound effects on Europe. Prior to that time, Europeans tended to be clannish and tribal. People tended to marry within the clan or tribe, this often meant marrying close cousins. The result was that people were inbred to a high degree. People living in clans were fiercely loyal to the clan and tended to distrust outsiders.

By enforcing a ban on cousin marriage, people had to search further afield for marriage partners. Over time, the decline of clannishness led to people becoming more individualistic and more trusting of outsiders. This led to increased co-operativeness and an increase of prosperity.
Someone should have told Europe's Royal families and Aristos about this. Exempting themselves from the exogamous mores of their societies may have caused the downfall of many.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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The royal families of Europe learned fairly quickly that they had to marry commoners at times to bring new blood into the blue line business. The Hanoverians are rumoured to have been a bit too heavy in the cousin-marrying line and there were a couple of Georges who weren't quite what was hoped for in the Kinging sector of the economy.
 

the secretary

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interesting topic.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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There are some serious issues in the middle eastern royal families derived from cousin intermarriage, and in the native populations generally. You get a higher incidence of diseases and disabilities due to family intermarriage at cousin level there than in many other parts of the world.
 

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In 2003 America was about to invade Iraq. The US Neoconservatives talked of nation building and imposing democracy on Iraq. The US journalist Steve Sailer pointed out that there was a huge impediment to the great hopes of the neocons-cousin marriage.

It can be argued that time has proved Sailer right.
By fostering intense family loyalties and strong nepotistic urges, inbreeding makes the development of civil society more difficult.
The clannishness, corruption, and coups frequently observed in countries such as Iraq appears to be in tied to the high rates of inbreeding.
Extended families that are incredibly tightly bound are really the enemy of civil society because the alliances of family override any consideration of fairness to people in the larger society.
How can we transform Iraq into a modern liberal democracy if every government worker sees a government job as a route to helping out his clan at the expense of other clans?”
The biggest disadvantage, however, may be political.
Cousin Marriage Conundrum
 

Emily Davison

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So scientific researchers have put forward a theory that a Ban on cousin marriage enforced by the medieval Catholic Church had profound effects on Europe. Prior to that time, Europeans tended to be clannish and tribal. People tended to marry within the clan or tribe, this often meant marrying close cousins. The result was that people were inbred to a high degree. People living in clans were fiercely loyal to the clan and tended to distrust outsiders.

By enforcing a ban on cousin marriage, people had to search further afield for marriage partners. Over time, the decline of clannishness led to people becoming more individualistic and more trusting of outsiders. This led to increased co-operativeness and an increase of prosperity.
Perhaps you’ll explain to us how that in breeding is working out in the Pakistani community?
 

Emily Davison

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You're grumpy this morning, Emily.
Not at all. I’ve seen in breeding in Ireland up close. And there seems to be certain genetic problems in Ireland which I’m sure are down to us having been too close. This will hopefully be sorted out with the influxes of the last two decades.

For example cystic fibrosis, Schizophrenia, being a bit touched.
 
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the secretary

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Is this the kind of topic that causes snowflakes to melt?
It's basically challenging the suitability of societies in certain parts of the world to respect the rule of law and govern themselves properly due to marriage within families.
This in very politically incorrect in today's world. Challenging would be another word for it.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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Well, the Hanoverians at a certain point in history were known to be a bit iffy in the intellect stakes. In fact the word 'hanoverian' in some circles became code for 'a bit stupid' for a while there.
 


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