Church spires as broadband relays.

former wesleyan

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https://news.sky.com/story/how-church-steeples-boost-wifi-connectivity-in-rural-communities-11255800

I wonder has our Dept of Communications etc considered this ?

Rural communities with little or no wireless internet are getting an unlikely boost from churches hosting satellite dishes.

St Giles Church in rural Essex is what you might expect of a 15th Century parish church.

The stone building is on a small hill surrounded by acres of green valleys, farms and a smattering of houses. It is right in the middle of the village of Great Maplestead.

But look closely and you will spot this medieval church has some very modern additions.

Perched atop the church tower is a small satellite dish and four telecoms transmitters that provide high-speed broadband to around 120 local households, which previously had no or limited coverage.

The antenna was installed two years ago by a broadband operator that specialises in connecting rural communities to the internet.

I'm not sure bouncing FitGranny.com from steeple to steeple was what the original builders had in mind, but the relay of broadband seems like one of those simple but effective ideas that Ireland should consider instead of pumping billions into fibreoptics which will become obsolete in due course.
 


Socratus O' Pericles

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This woman decided to provide broadband for her community at very reasonable cost:

B4RN now claims to have laid 2,000 miles (3,218km) of cable and connected a string of local parishes to its network. It won't connect a single household, so the entire parish has to be on board before it will begin to build.

Each household pays £30 per month with a £150 connection fee and larger businesses pay more. Households must also do some of the installation themselves.
The farmer who built her own broadband - BBC News

Whatever works I'm for it.
 

Mitsui2

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https://news.sky.com/story/how-church-steeples-boost-wifi-connectivity-in-rural-communities-11255800

I wonder has our Dept of Communications etc considered this ?

Rural communities with little or no wireless internet are getting an unlikely boost from churches hosting satellite dishes.


I'm not sure bouncing FitGranny.com from steeple to steeple was what the original builders had in mind, but the relay of broadband seems like one of those simple but effective ideas that Ireland should consider instead of pumping billions into fibreoptics which will become obsolete in due course.
You'll have Kilbarry here fretting about State interference in religion, wes - why should churches facilitate porn websites &c.

Mind you I suppose it would be okay on Protestant steeples - I hear themmuns don't believe in anything anyway.
 

Lúidín

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It might work in the Republic but in the North, Catholic signals bouncing off Protestant steeples would be counter to the Good Friday Agreement.
 

borntorum

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It might work in the Republic but in the North, Catholic signals bouncing off Protestant steeples would be counter to the Good Friday Agreement.
As long as nobody was accessing Irish language sites I wouldn't foresee a problem
 

ionsniffer

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maybe they could house a few homeless in parish priests massive homes instead?
 

Congalltee

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Will it impact protected buildings? Will an EIS be required? Are their any public health concerns?
 

PBP voter

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This is fine for villages.

But no real use for the insanity that is once off housing.
 

former wesleyan

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This is fine for villages.

But no real use for the insanity that is once off housing.
But if the one-offs were within range it would be much cheaper than other options.
 

ON THE ONE ROAD

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highest speed is up to 40 MB/s i think that is close to our minimum at peek times for what passes for broadband.

But the idea could assist with 4G line of sight issues. A lot of ************************ about planning permission in some places.

Good spot.
 

im axeled

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https://news.sky.com/story/how-church-steeples-boost-wifi-connectivity-in-rural-communities-11255800

I wonder has our Dept of Communications etc considered this ?

Rural communities with little or no wireless internet are getting an unlikely boost from churches hosting satellite dishes.




I'm not sure bouncing FitGranny.com from steeple to steeple was what the original builders had in mind, but the relay of broadband seems like one of those simple but effective ideas that Ireland should consider instead of pumping billions into fibreoptics which will become obsolete in due course.
kenya has proved this to be true, most of their broadband is wireless
 

fergal1790

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All this happened years ago when they banned the "deflector aerials" making television in more rural areas and in mountainous areas almost impossible to provide for.
 

wexfordman

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https://news.sky.com/story/how-church-steeples-boost-wifi-connectivity-in-rural-communities-11255800

I wonder has our Dept of Communications etc considered this ?

Rural communities with little or no wireless internet are getting an unlikely boost from churches hosting satellite dishes.




I'm not sure bouncing FitGranny.com from steeple to steeple was what the original builders had in mind, but the relay of broadband seems like one of those simple but effective ideas that Ireland should consider instead of pumping billions into fibreoptics which will become obsolete in due course.
Ignoring the fact that wireless is not a long term viable solution for fixed broadband services, there are already a number of chruches in Ireland used for mobile sites.

Mainly if not Only protestant churches funnily enough the Catholic churches are not so open to the idea.
 

wexfordman

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