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Co. Carlow in the War of Independence

Éireann_Ascendant

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Two articles about Carlow during the War of Independence.

Understated Insurgency: The Carlow Brigade in the War of Independence, 1917-1921

An overview of the Carlow IRA Brigade, from its official formation in 1917 to the Truce of July 1921.

"Carlow," in the words of one historian, "does not have a very active fighting story. This may sometimes have been adverted to by way of implied reproach."

On the other hand, a British officer in the area at the time of the Truce was struck at the level of preparation against attack the soldiers there thought necessary while only twenty miles from the Curragh. The officer hated to think what the rest of the country was like if Carlow was considered that dangerous.

The RIC bore the brunt of much of the the violence. There were a number of assassination attempts on Crown policemen, with one of the more dramatic incidents being an ambush in the town of Tullow against a four-strong patrol of RIC men.

For the most part, however, the guerilla war in Co. Carlow was an example of a 'low intensity' conflict. Road blockades, bridge sabotages and intelligence gathering (the IRA had a cell of informants within the post office of Carlow town) were more the norm than the likes of Kilmichael and Bloody Sunday in other parts of the country.

Ultimately, it was about staying ahead of the ever-present danger of arrests and round-ups, and for the most part the Carlow Volunteers succeeded.

Bushwhacked: The Loss of the Carlow Flying Column, April 1921

The brief existence of the Carlow flying column before it was overwhelmed by a British patrol, with most of its members taken captive.

One of its members was killed during the brief skirmish, in contested circumstances.

Another casualty from the fight was a local man, found shot to death two days later. IRA veterans from the period remembered him as the spy who had alerted the British patrol to the flying column, though the facts, as with many cases from this period, are far from clear.

While intended to take the war to the Crown enemy, the fate of the column, and the loss of its men and equipment, would seem to justify the 'low-key' approach the Carlow Brigade took for the most part during the War.



(Carlow courthouse)
 


making waves

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During the General Strike in 1920 - which received huge support in Carlow - a mass demonstration in Muine Bheag declared the establishment of a Provisional Soviet Government in Ireland.

While it was a premature declaration - it so scared the bejaysus out of the nationalist leadership that they deployed the IRA to suppress the strike wave that existed in Carlow (and Kilkenny) at that time.
 

Carlos Danger

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During the General Strike in 1920 - which received huge support in Carlow - a mass demonstration in Muine Bheag declared the establishment of a Provisional Soviet Government in Ireland.

While it was a premature declaration - it so scared the bejaysus out of the nationalist leadership that they deployed the IRA to suppress the strike wave that existed in Carlow (and Kilkenny) at that time.
If only the Carlwegians could've held out and put the running dog Black Cats in their place.
 

The Field Marshal

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TBH it is hard to be interested in any thread that sets out to glorify anything on the abysmal and awkward county structure inflicted on the island of Ireland by that foreign ogre Henry the Eight.

If somebody ever asks me "what county man are you?" then I know I have encountered something horrible.
 
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Carlos Danger

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TBH it is hard to be interested in any thread that sets out to glorify an abysmal and awkward county structure inflicted on the island of Ireland by that foreign ogre Henry the Eight.

If somebody ever asks me "what county man are you?" then I know I have encountered something horrible.
Makes you a Dub.
 

Seanie Lemass

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During the General Strike in 1920 - which received huge support in Carlow - a mass demonstration in Muine Bheag declared the establishment of a Provisional Soviet Government in Ireland.

While it was a premature declaration - it so scared the bejaysus out of the nationalist leadership that they deployed the IRA to suppress the strike wave that existed in Carlow (and Kilkenny) at that time.

that is total nonsense. The general strike was in support of the IRA.

And we are so unlucky we never had soviets. Being such a success and all as they were elsewhere ....
 

Seanie Lemass

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Carlow did nothing in Tan War by the way. Same as everywhere outside of Dublin and Munster.

1916 centenary has given rise to all sorts of bullsh1t from people excusing places like Carlow.
 

GDPR

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that is total nonsense. The general strike was in support of the IRA.

And we are so unlucky we never had soviets. Being such a success and all as they were elsewhere ....
The "Socialist Party" so called have their own special interpretation of Irish history. Their views on Northern Ireland are both extremely confused and confusing- Anti-GFA unionists who believe the Provies sold out to Imperialism and should be condemned for that.
 

cyberianpan

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Carlow to this day is stashed full of girlie men

Milk drinking surrender donkeys

Granted due to their lactose intolerance they often farted in the general direction of their colonial overlords ...but they were farts of mice, not men ...wouldn't even snuff an ailing Granny at six feet

cyp
 

Seanie Lemass

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Carlow to this day is stashed full of girlie men

Milk drinking surrender donkeys

Granted due to their lactose intolerance they often farted in the general direction of their colonial overlords ...but they were farts of mice, not men ...wouldn't even snuff an ailing Granny at six feet

cyp

My grandmother had a similar view of the people of possibly the most useless county in the country. I can't think of any contribution that Carlow has made to the historical, sporting, literary life of the country.
 

EUrJokingMeRight

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EUrJokingMeRight

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My grandmother had a similar view of the people of possibly the most useless county in the country. I can't think of any contribution that Carlow has made to the historical, sporting, literary life of the country.
Clearly the OP has an eye on public office and wants to dress up his grandfathers cowardice as something clever executed in 'the national interest' of course.

'Vote for me' a descendant of a girlie man doesnt really capture the imagination.

Carlow, nice people but nice is all you get.
 

RasherHash

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My grandmother had a similar view of the people of possibly the most useless county in the country. I can't think of any contribution that Carlow has made to the historical, sporting, literary life of the country.
John Tyndall

INVENTOR, PHILOSOPHER

With his family only able to afford a hedge-school education, Leighlinbridge born John Tyndall did not enter university until he was in his mid thirties, but despite this obvious disadvantage, went on to become one of the most significant scientists of the 19th century. A founding father of the science of ‘nephelometry’, one of Tydall’s greatest contributions was the explanation as to why the sky is blue, a phenomenon that is now known as the ‘Tyndall Effect’, whilst the specific blue colour of the sky is also called ‘Tyndall Blue’.

Thomas Traynor

PATRIOT

Having fought alongside Eamon de Valera at the Boland Mills Garrison during the Easter Rising of 1916, Thomas Traynor spent some time in prison in Wakefield, England. Upon his release he returned to active duty with the IRA and was attached to ‘B’ Company, 3rd Battalion Dublin Brigade, during the Irish War of Independence. On March 14th, 1921, whilst in action against British soldiers and the Black and Tans, he was captured on Pearse Street, Dublin and was tried and sentenced to death by hanging at Mountjoy Prison on April 25th, 1921.

Samuel Haughton

SCIENTIST

Samuel Haughton was a man of prodigious academic talent who communicated papers on widely different subjects ranging from mathematical physics and polarized light to the mineralogy of Ireland and Wales. At the age of thirty-eight, he decided to study medicine at Trinity College and is credited with the great improvements which were made to the medical facilities in that institution during his time there.

Myles Keogh

SOLDIER

Myles Keogh is best known for a spectacular military career which he undertook during a fourteen year period of his life. Initially serving as a lieutenant in the battalion of St. Patrick in the Papal Army of Pius IX, upon the outbreak of the American Civil War, Keogh joined the Federal Army, and saw service as a brevet lieutenant-colonel, commanding three thousand cavalry. At the end of the war he joined the peacetime army as a captain in the 7th US Cavalry regiment under General Custer and fought in the Battle of Little Bighorn where he was killed in the summer of 1876. :)
 

freewillie

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Isn't Kathryn Thomas from Carlow?
 

Seanie Lemass

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I think Olivia O'Leary is also.


And this is supposed to enhance our view of Carlovians is it :)

Almost sure Marion Finnucane is from Carlow, or has inflicted herself on them, so I suppose they are more to be pitied than scorned.
 

jams odonnell

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TBH it is hard to be interested in any thread that sets out to glorify anything on the abysmal and awkward county structure inflicted on the island of Ireland by that foreign ogre Henry the Eight.

If somebody ever asks me "what county man are you?" then I know I have encountered something horrible.
Indeed. The true Gael maintains his allegiance to his province, and then country (which includes Scotland).

Those IRFU lads have hit on something very powerful with that provincial structure.

When Oh When will Michael D return Clare by Presidential decree to its rightful home in Connacht?
 


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