Comment is Free, Except at The Irish Times

Mercurial

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Time was when Fianna Fáil endorsed the Irish Times to the extent of recommending that their members read the Irish Times or the Evening Mail rather than anti-republican papers ......
I used to alternate between the Times and the Examiner, when I regularly read newspapers. Eventually I was mostly just buying them for the Sudoku, which took about the length of a lecture to complete.
 


drummed

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I used to alternate between the Times and the Examiner, when I regularly read newspapers. Eventually I was mostly just buying them for the Sudoku, which took about the length of a lecture to complete.
I remember lecturers like you.:shock2:
 

Sister Mercedes

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#172 is Djibouti. The same week the lawyers for the President of Djibouti are in Dublin taking a High Court case to use Ireland's defamation laws to force Facebook to remove negative comments about him.

Press freedom my hole. Shame on the quangocrats who compiled this report.
 

drummed

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Massive props to Eritrea, for beating North Korea to the bottom of the list. According to Human Rights Watch, the country has no press at all, no doubt an outcome encouraged by the official policy of torturing and murdering anybody who tries to do anything resembling journalism.

Would not help at all I suppose. Can't believe North Korea was second last. They won't be one bit happy at this defeat.
 

drummed

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#172 is Djoubuti. The same week the lawyers for the President of Djoubuti are 8n Dublin taking a High Court case to use Ireland's defamation laws to force Facebook to remove negative comments about him.

Press freedom my hole. Shame on the quangocrats who compiled this report.
I think your example sort of proves why they are 172? That post makes no sense really.
 

Truth.ie

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Massive props to Eritrea, for beating North Korea to the bottom of the list. According to Human Rights Watch, the country has no press at all, no doubt an outcome encouraged by the official policy of torturing and murdering anybody who tries to do anything resembling journalism.
Or...... they had little time to study journalism as they were too busy Civil Warring and tribal fighting.
 

gerhard dengler

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The comments are the most interesting part of the paper. The letters page is just cuckoo nonsense.
I think you're being generous here.

The IT content is useless and polemical. Therefore any comments concerning the IT's content is probably worthless.
 

gatsbygirl20

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Following on from last year's introduction of a paywall for viewing articles,

http://www.politics.ie/forum/media/235047-paper-going-subscription-limited-access.html

it seems that without a subscription you will no longer be able to comment at all on The Irish Times website.

According to the former chairman of this board:



If it's a recruitment drive for subscribers, it's hard to see how not being able to comment would be considered a greater hardship than not being able to read the articles.

If it's a measure to cut down on trolls, it doesn't seem like an effective one given the number of free to use social media platforms that are linked to the IT site.

Thoughts?
I imagine that this is just a filtering system to save time trawling through comments to weed out the nut jobs, the libellers, and the hurlers of abuse who must take up a lot of the time of on-line editors.

. And if people have to be registered and paying it might perhaps make it less likely that every passing browser will throw up a comment.

I actually think professional journalists trying to earn a living, with their real names on their byline, should not have meekly acquiesced to the idea that comments could be made anonymously below their articles.

If people want to comment, or reply to a point made in an article, let them do so under their real name, when the journalist is writing under her real name.

Otherwise it is not a level playing field, really.

It's different here on P.ie where we're all anonymous and masked. We can only attack the Username--not the real person in their professional capacity.

I am uncomfortable with anonymous comments against named people, whether it is Ratemyteacher or newspaper comments
 

redhead

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I imagine that this is just a filtering system to save time trawling through comments to weed out the nut jobs, the libellers, and the hurlers of abuse who must take up a lot of the time of on-line editors.

. And if people have to be registered and paying it might perhaps make it less likely that every passing browser will throw up a comment.

I actually think professional journalists trying to earn a living, with their real names on their byline, should not have meekly acquiesced to the idea that comments could be made anonymously below their articles.

If people want to comment, or reply to a point made in an article, let them do so under their real name, when the journalist is writing under her real name.

Otherwise it is not a level playing field, really.

It's different here on P.ie where we're all anonymous and masked. We can only attack the Username--not the real person in their professional capacity.

I am uncomfortable with anonymous comments against named people, whether it is Ratemyteacher or newspaper comments
I take your point gg, but I don't think that's it. You have to be registered to comment to begin with and supply more than just an email address.

Granted you can have a username but you don't really have anonymity and the comments are quite well policed, it's not a free for all and nothing like here.

I do think it is a very cynical attempt to get people to subscribe because the paywall failed.

The reason though is their pricing structure, the basic cost is €12 a month. They aren't pricing wrt digital but as a substitute for printed media and aren't taking into account that the way it is consumed is different.

To put it in perspective, Netflix is €9.99, the value isn't comparable. They need to rethink their business model.
 

stopdoingstuff

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Think about it though. Shouldn't papers be charging? If everything becomes free at source, what we will end up with is about 500 outfits recycling standardized news produced by 2 or 3 sources, while anything investigative and that genuinely adds social value being largely unaffordable.
 

Nedz Newt

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if we're talking about quality issues with the Irish Times...

My cousin Tarquin, is frightfully enraged of late.....he suspects they're using inferior paper to print on.....his man, Stevens, can spend an extra 30 minutes ironing and folding it before it's presented to him in the den, with his morning quail.

Tarquin's trying to encourage everyone at the club to desist from buying it until the wrong is righted. Unfortunately, his pleas are falling on deaf ears....he no longer has the influence he once had,,,,,not since 'the incident'......terribly bad luck one has to concede.
The incident? The incident?! Thee incident?
You're referring of course to the outrage in the Pavilion, which occurred just as Smith-Gosling (minor) was facing Jones-Pyles at the crease and the....incident, as you so delicately put it, caused a flock of hitherto grounded pigeons near the stump to take flight, which in turn had Smith-Gosling out for a duck and troubled the Dean Provost Rev Swann so much he spilled his tea on Miss Starlling's feather boa, as the other ladies qualied with fear?
That incident?
Tarquin will be 12th man for some time to come, I fear....
 

Boy M5

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The incident? The incident?! Thee incident?
You're referring of course to the outrage in the Pavilion, which occurred just as Smith-Gosling (minor) was facing Jones-Pyles at the crease and the....incident, as you so delicately put it, caused a flock of hitherto grounded pigeons near the stump to take flight, which in turn had Smith-Gosling out for a duck and troubled the Dean Provost Rev Swann so much he spilled his tea on Miss Starlling's feather boa, as the other ladies qualied with fear?
That incident?
Tarquin will be 12th man for some time to come, I fear....
You're away with the birds....
 


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