Compulsory arbitration law needed for hospital strike by nurses

Patslatt1

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Essential services such as transportation, police, power supplies and hospitals should be covered by compulsory arbitration on labour disputes since the disruption to society of strikes in those services is completely out of proportion to the grievances and wage demands of striking employees. The sacred cow right to strike can do limited damage in most private sector businesses but inflict intolerable damage on the public in essential industries which generally are dominated by the public sector. Given that public sector pay is over 40% higher than the private sector average and public sector pensions are incredibly attractive for the top half, there is no justification for strikes.
The above argument applies equally to the announced nurses' union plan to strike. With pay levels for nurses averaging around €58,000 a year, way higher than the €35,000 national average and about 40% higher than the UK nurses,a strike for higher pay is intolerable.
 


artfoley56

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Essential services such as transportation, police, power supplies and hospitals should be covered by compulsory arbitration on labour disputes since the disruption to society of strikes in those services is completely out of proportion to the grievances and wage demands of striking employees. The sacred cow right to strike can do limited damage in most private sector businesses but inflict intolerable damage on the public in essential industries which generally are dominated by the public sector. Given that public sector pay is over 40% higher than the private sector average and public sector pensions are incredibly attractive for the top half, there is no justification for strikes.
The above argument applies equally to the announced nurses' union plan to strike. With pay levels for nurses averaging around €58,000 a year, way higher than the €35,000 national average and about 40% higher than the UK nurses,a strike for higher pay is intolerable.
does your boss know how much of your time you spend on here?
 

making waves

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Patslatt's daily bash the public sector thread.

And as for your OP - you can ****************************** off with your attack on basic democratic rights.
 

Patslatt1

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Patslatt's daily bash the public sector thread.

And as for your OP - you can ****************************** off with your attack on basic democratic rights.
The sacred cow right to strike in essential services which can hold a gun to the head of society must be ended with compulsory arbitration. These industries generally have highly paid employees with excellent public sector pensions, not hardship cases like the starving workers in the 1913 general strike.It is also important that relevant government ministers and the minister of finance retain the right to reject an arbitration award since fiscal responsibility resides with the government.i
 

Patslatt1

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Patslatt's daily bash the public sector thread.

And as for your OP - you can ****************************** off with your attack on basic democratic rights.
It's a sacred cow right to strike in essential industries which can hold a gun to the head of society.
 

making waves

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It's a sacred cow right to strike in essential industries which can hold a gun to the head of society.
The right to strike is a basic democratic right - your drivel is driven by your obsession with bashing the public sector.
 

Patslatt1

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The right to strike is a basic democratic right - your drivel is driven by your obsession with bashing the public sector.
So we should let fire brigades strike while Dublin burns and rioters loot and burn as police strike? But for brave gardai, O'Connell Street could have burned down in the riots triggered by visiting Orange Order members about ten years ago. Dublin scum joined the politically motivated rioters for the fun of it, coming together through social media.

To stand up for the right to strike in hospitals, would you do so if you were seriously ill? You'd be a political fanatic to say yes.

The aristocratic pay and pensions entitlements of the upper half of the public sector need bashing.
 

making waves

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So we should let fire brigades strike while Dublin burns and rioters loot and burn as police strike? But for brave gardai, O'Connell Street could have burned down in the riots triggered by visiting Orange Order members aout ten years ago. Dublin scum joined the politically motivated rioters for the fun of it, coming together through social media.
Letting your imagination running a bit wild there pat
 

Patslatt1

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Letting your imagination running a bit wild there pat
You avoided the key question above, exposing your phoney argument about democratic rights to strike:

To stand up for the right to strike in hospitals, would you do so if you were seriously ill? You'd be a political fanatic to say yes.
 

Baron von Biffo

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Essential services such as transportation, police, power supplies and hospitals should be covered by compulsory arbitration on labour disputes since the disruption to society of strikes in those services is completely out of proportion to the grievances and wage demands of striking employees. The sacred cow right to strike can do limited damage in most private sector businesses but inflict intolerable damage on the public in essential industries which generally are dominated by the public sector. Given that public sector pay is over 40% higher than the private sector average and public sector pensions are incredibly attractive for the top half, there is no justification for strikes.
The above argument applies equally to the announced nurses' union plan to strike. With pay levels for nurses averaging around €58,000 a year, way higher than the €35,000 national average and about 40% higher than the UK nurses,a strike for higher pay is intolerable.
I was beginning to worry that you might have suffered a mishap. It had gone so late and you hadn't posted your daily PS hate thread.
 

making waves

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You avoided the key question above, exposing your phoney argument about democratic rights to strike:

To stand up for the right to strike in hospitals, would you do so if you were seriously ill? You'd be a political fanatic to say yes.
No patient has ever suffered because of a nurses or doctors strike - emergency cover is always provided and nurses and doctors have left the picket line in previous disputes to care for patients.

In contrast - the health policies of right-wing governments have and continue to cause the deaths of people and ensure over-worked, underpaid staff and inadequately funded and staffed hospitals where people suffer as a consequence. Instead of addressing the crisis in the health service as a result of a century of under-funding - you want to deprive the workers providing the service of their basic democratic rights and whinge and whine and complain and engage in public sector bashing - and all because you have too much time on your hands from sucking on daddy's silver spoon.
 

Patslatt1

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No patient has ever suffered because of a nurses or doctors strike - emergency cover is always provided and nurses and doctors have left the picket line in previous disputes to care for patients.

In contrast - the health policies of right-wing governments have and continue to cause the deaths of people and ensure over-worked, underpaid staff and inadequately funded and staffed hospitals where people suffer as a consequence. Instead of addressing the crisis in the health service as a result of a century of under-funding - you want to deprive the workers providing the service of their basic democratic rights and whinge and whine and complain and engage in public sector bashing - and all because you have too much time on your hands from sucking on daddy's silver spoon.
A strike can't provide the same coverage of ill patients as normal operations and some ill patients will deteriotate without constant monitoring. Many patients who are borderline will also become seriously ill. Even the threat of a strike causes needless worry among them.

A century of underfunding after the Irish Hospitals Sweepstakes charitable contributions helped open too many acute care hospitals all over Ireland from the 1920s to the 1960s? Labour costs were low and nurses and doctors plentiful in the old days.

The so called right wing government from your perspective as a hard leftie funds a health care system that consumes a whopping 12% of the economy. The main problems in health care are well known: 1. A hospital in every town with at least 29 acute care hospitals or even more depending on definition, hospitals that should be consolidated into maybe half their number 2. Unionised public sector workers pay and gold plated pensions about 40% more than the UK and more still than France 3. Restrictive practices such as a)the barrier to both nurses helpers until a few years ago and a lower grade of nursing qualification, contrary to international practice and b)the refusal of diagnostics to work outside normal office hours which contributes to severe bed blocking 4. The much longer time it takes to qualify in Ireland as a hospital specialist 5.The overly bureaucratic HSE which seems very unresponsive to the medical professions and the public.

On the latter point, maybe salaries competitive with the private sector should be paid to attract a small number of highly talented top key executives and especially the CEO. While most health care workers have far higher salaries than the private sector, the opposite is true of top HSE executives
 

DJP

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With pay levels for nurses averaging around €58,000 a year... about 40% higher than the UK nurses,a strike for higher pay is intolerable.
Then why are most newly qualified Irish nurses emigrating even though most of them want to work in Ireland?
 

firefly123

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So we should let fire brigades strike while Dublin burns and rioters loot and burn as police strike? But for brave gardai, O'Connell Street could have burned down in the riots triggered by visiting Orange Order members about ten years ago. Dublin scum joined the politically motivated rioters for the fun of it, coming together through social media.

To stand up for the right to strike in hospitals, would you do so if you were seriously ill? You'd be a political fanatic to say yes.

The aristocratic pay and pensions entitlements of the upper half of the public sector need bashing.
Now there's an idea!

Thanks for that pat
 

wombat

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Then why are most newly qualified Irish nurses emigrating even though most of them want to work in Ireland?
Nurses have always emigrated while young because they have a skill that's in demand and there are always opportunities to earn good money somewhere else as well as get experience. 40 years ago it was Canada, currently its Australia but most prefer to return.
 

wombat

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Then why are most newly qualified Irish nurses emigrating even though most of them want to work in Ireland?
Even if that's correct, the solution would be to raise the starting pay rather than across the board increases, the 50 year old married to the Garda in Port Laoise is not going to take off to Dubai.
 

DJP

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Nurses have always emigrated while young because they have a skill that's in demand and there are always opportunities to earn good money somewhere else as well as get experience. 40 years ago it was Canada, currently its Australia but most prefer to return.
There is an unacceptably high burnout rate in the Irish public health system. Most nurses who emigrate apparently don't want to emigrate. I'd rather have them work in Ireland and if paying them more is enough to keep them here then I would be in favour of that.
 

Mercurial

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Essential services such as transportation, police, power supplies and hospitals should be covered by compulsory arbitration on labour disputes since the disruption to society of strikes in those services is completely out of proportion to the grievances and wage demands of striking employees. The sacred cow right to strike can do limited damage in most private sector businesses but inflict intolerable damage on the public in essential industries which generally are dominated by the public sector. Given that public sector pay is over 40% higher than the private sector average and public sector pensions are incredibly attractive for the top half, there is no justification for strikes.
The above argument applies equally to the announced nurses' union plan to strike. With pay levels for nurses averaging around €58,000 a year, way higher than the €35,000 national average and about 40% higher than the UK nurses,a strike for higher pay is intolerable.
Source?
 

wombat

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There is an unacceptably high burnout rate in the Irish public health system. Most nurses who emigrate apparently don't want to emigrate. I'd rather have them work in Ireland and if paying them more is enough to keep them here then I would be in favour of that.
Those who want to emigrate will do so, starting salaries are irrelevant.
 


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