Con and her successors (Women's Emancipation)

Malcolm Redfellow

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Connie Gore-Booth has had a few mentions, in connection with the centenary of women's emancipation. The UK post office is issuing stamps!

Guess who is missing?

OK: the Representation of the People Act 1918 gave propertied women, over the age of thirty, voting rights. Notice the age and class differentials there.

So, in the General election of 14 December 1914 (a Saturday, oddly), Connie Gore-Booth/Constance de Markievicz took Dublin St Patrick's Constituency:
  • Constance de Markievicz (Sinn Féin) 7,835 (65.9%)
  • William Field (Parliamentary Party) 3,752 (31.5%)
  • James Joseph Kelly (Ind. Nationalist) 312 (2.6%)
Impressive, but not the easiest win. Percentage-wise in the City, only Dublin-Harbour and Clontarf had closer Sinn Féin majorities.

Meanwhile, how did Sinn Féin display its gender-neutrality across the rest of the nation?

Poorly.

Only in one other constituency was the Sinn Féin candidate (presumably) possessed of XX-chromosomes:
  • Belfast Victoria
  • Donald Thompson (Labour Unionist) 9309
  • Robert Waugh (Labour Representation Committee) 3469
  • Miss Winifred Carney (Sinn Féin) 539.
Pause and consider why, at that election, "Labour must stand down". It obviously didn't apply in the Black North.

Meanwhile may I propose another Irish hero.

Connie Gore-Booth's younger (and, in literature, more talented) — sister: Eva.

For decades she has been written off. Worse still, thanks to Willie Yeats, she has been traduced:
The older is condemned to death,
Pardoned, drags out lonely years
Conspiring among the ignorant.
I know not what the younger dreams –
Some vague Utopia – and she seems,
When withered old and skeleton-gaunt,
An image of such politics.
Both Gore-Booth sisters were "left-of-centre": hence there among the ignorant. That decodes as: working among the poor; and in Eva's case, those of Manchester and being a suffragette.

Since 1896 Eva had a close relationship with Esther Roper. Esther had Irish origins through her mother, but had sprung from the Manchester working class.
 


GDPR

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Winifred Carney was not a woman of property and she was a life long Socialist. James Connolly;s secretary, she was with him in the GPO.

She married a Protestant Orangeman who was former member of the Ulster Volunteers.

Its worth checking her out.

The BBC did a great programme on her recently.

BBC One - Voices 16 - Winifred Carney
 

Barroso

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Connie Gore-Booth has had a few mentions, in connection with the centenary of women's emancipation. The UK post office is issuing stamps!

Guess who is missing?

OK: the Representation of the People Act 1918 gave propertied women, over the age of thirty, voting rights. Notice the age and class differentials there.

So, in the General election of 14 December 1914 (a Saturday, oddly), Connie Gore-Booth/Constance de Markievicz took Dublin St Patrick's Constituency:
  • Constance de Markievicz (Sinn Féin) 7,835 (65.9%)
  • William Field (Parliamentary Party) 3,752 (31.5%)
  • James Joseph Kelly (Ind. Nationalist) 312 (2.6%)
Impressive, but not the easiest win. Percentage-wise in the City, only Dublin-Harbour and Clontarf had closer Sinn Féin majorities.

Meanwhile, how did Sinn Féin display its gender-neutrality across the rest of the nation?

Poorly.

Only in one other constituency was the Sinn Féin candidate (presumably) possessed of XX-chromosomes:
  • Belfast Victoria
  • Donald Thompson (Labour Unionist) 9309
  • Robert Waugh (Labour Representation Committee) 3469
  • Miss Winifred Carney (Sinn Féin) 539.
Pause and consider why, at that election, "Labour must stand down". It obviously didn't apply in the Black North.

Meanwhile may I propose another Irish hero.

Connie Gore-Booth's younger (and, in literature, more talented) — sister: Eva.

For decades she has been written off. Worse still, thanks to Willie Yeats, she has been traduced:

Both Gore-Booth sisters were "left-of-centre": hence there among the ignorant. That decodes as: working among the poor; and in Eva's case, those of Manchester and being a suffragette.

Since 1896 Eva had a close relationship with Esther Roper. Esther had Irish origins through her mother, but had sprung from the Manchester working class.
Interesting to see that SF had only two female candidates.
I wonder how that compared to the other parties, nationalist, unionist and british?

Correct me if I'm wrong, only one woman was returned to westminister, and she didn't take her seat.
Any guesses as to which party that single woman who was elected belonged to?
 

Malcolm Redfellow

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Interesting to see that SF had only two female candidates.
I wonder how that compared to the other parties, nationalist, unionist and british?
I'd suggest 'only two female candidates' is quite commendable, under the circumstances. In 1918 Sinn Féin, as a political party, was embryonic. Moreover, it was very much the 'civil' face of primarily a military (and therefore predominantly male) force. Con Markievicz played no part — except a symbolic one — in the 1918 campaign: she was in Holloway.

Across the whole UK, of the 1,623 names on the ballot papers of 1918, seventeen were of women.

One cluster was in the West Midlands. Mary MacArthur was Labour candidate in the newly-drawn Stoubridge constituency, and was tipped as a potential winner. In a three-way split, she lost out to the Liberal John William Wilson. Christabel Pankhurst came closer in Smethwick, losing by 4.4% in a straight fight with Labour, as a 'Women's Party' candidate (though this affiliation was a front for the Tories — and one may hear Tories claiming her as a party affiliate). Margery Corbett Ashby ran a brave but poor Liberal third in Birmingham Ladywood to Neville Chamberlain.

I've often seen it claimed that the restriction on women's suffrage (i.e. a minor property qualification, and the age of thirty) which applied between 1918 and 1929 was somehow a reflection of women's perceived mental maturity. It was actually more to do the carnage of the World war and with ensuring women were still a minority.

There's a further oddity about women MPs: neither of the first two was a suffragette. Lady Nancy Astor as the first elected (very much in lieu of her husband, the former Member for Plymouth, Sutton, who had been elevated to the Lords) had never shown any enthusiasm for much except extreme imperialism and weirdo religiosities (e.g. anti-semitism, anti-Roman Catholicism which extended to anti-Irish prejudice). The second was Katherine Marjory Murray, a.k.a. Kitty Atholl, who had been a fervid anti-suffragist and was still voting against equal pay measures well into the 1930s. Originally the staunchest of Scottish Unionists, she was MP for West Perthshire for fifteen years, then converted to the cause of the Spanish Republicans (a friendship with Ellen Wilkinson is credited there), so ended up being denounced as a communist.
 

Telstar 62

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A Suffragette tried to burn down Dublin's Theatre Royal with 3,000 inside.

Celebrate that?:rolleyes:
 

Malcolm Redfellow

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A Suffragette tried to burn down Dublin's Theatre Royal with 3,000 inside.

Celebrate that?
Don't be daft.

And don't go overboard with the actualité.

The context was Prime Minister Herbert Asquith visiting Dublin in July 1912. He travelled in a carriage with John Redmond and a hatchet was thrown at the carriage, missing Asquith, and striking Redmond in the arm. Around the hatchet was a message: This symbol of the extinction of the Liberal Party for evermore. Hardly the most explicit suffragette message.

The Theatre Royal (a cinema, by the way, in Hawkins Street: it's now the Department of Health) episode, to which you refer, involved a chair being thrown from the balcony into the pit, 'flammable liquid' being sprayed around the projection booth, and matches being struck. Since film stock of that vintage derived from Hannibal Goodwin's patent for nitrocellulose, it was highly inflammable. Which was a well-known risk, and why projection booths were lined with asbestos, and surrounded by umpteen other precautions. [A barn in Dromcollogher, County Limerick, being used as a 'pop-up' cinema, burned out in 1928, when a candle ignited the nitrate stock, and 48 were killed.] All ways up, about the safest place to light matches in a proper cinema of those days might well be near the projection booth. Anyway, the projection equipment was not in use at this day: it was a political rally for the Irish Nationalist Party.

So, on 7 August 1912, four women: Gladys Evans, Mary Leigh (the hatchet-chucker), Lizzie Baker (real name Jennie Baines), and Mabel Capper ended up before a special court, having committed serious outrages at the time of the visit of the British Prime Minister Herbert Asquith. All had English home addresses, and were seemingly chasing Asquith. They were defended by no less than Tim Healey.

Proceedings did not go well. The authorities at first insisted that no women, other than the defendants, be allowed in the Court. The good folk of Dublin, not necessarily all naturally sympathetic to the suffragette cause but recognising an opportunity to cause trouble, saw this as an outrage, and reacted accordingly.

The Evening Post report of the second trial is on-line here.
 


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