‘Conflating Sex Work And Trafficking Is Harmful. We Need To Stop’

Joined
Dec 20, 2018
Messages
19
‘Conflating Sex Work And Trafficking Is Harmful. We Need To Stop’




‘Conflating Sex Work And Trafficking Is Harmful. We Need To Stop’
By Louise Cahill, Sexual Health Specialist Nurse30 Jul 2019
ECP-Nurse.png
EQUALITY, WOMEN, WORKPLACE

One of the biggest issues that sex workers face in regard to the law is the conflation of sex work with sex trafficking.

Human trafficking is a horrific human rights violation that utilizes threats, force, abduction, deception, and coercion in order to control people and exploit them.
Sex work is a consensual transaction between adults. For many sex workers, this is their only means of survival.

The Global Commission on HIV and the Law states unequivocally that: “Sex work and sex trafficking are not the same. The difference is that the former is consensual, whereas the latter is coercive.”
Trafficking is also not unique to the sex industry; it exists anywhere that people work.
Trafficking in agriculture is rife, yet we don’t see lobby groups standing outside Sainsbury’s demanding they stop selling fruit and vegetables or picketing car washes or manufacturing and building companies.
Louise Cahill, Sexual Health Specialist
National Crime Agency figures reveal that last year 307 adults were confirmed to be victims of labour exploitation – often working in agriculture, car washes or on building sites – with a further 1,069 cases pending review.
This is three times higher than the number of confirmed cases of sexual exploitation over the same time period at 102 people – with 966 further cases pending review.
Trafficking in agriculture is rife, yet we don’t see lobby groups standing outside supermarkets demanding they stop selling fruit and vegetables or picketing car washes or manufacturing and building companies.
Sex for some reason is viewed differently.
Many anti-trafficking organizations and self-described sex work abolitionists regard all sex workers as victims, as we have seen recently in Swansea, where sex workers are being forced to enter help programs or be criminalized.


Police Welfare Visits Are ‘Fostering Distrust’
ECP-animation-2-1024x557.png

Image Credit: Tom Senior


Shutting brothels and other venues deprive sex workers of control over their situation and most importantly of safe working conditions.
Police raids on brothels – known officially as “welfare visits” – have in the past yielded few results in achieving their supposed aim of identifying trafficking victims. But they have succeeded in fostering mistrust between sex workers and authorities, driving sex work further into the shadows with a negative knock-on effect on public health programs.
These checks are meant to be used to ‘visit’ people believed to be vulnerable or at-risk for a wide variety of reasons.
But, in my experience of joining police on welfare checks, they are rarely intelligence-led.
Instead, a few addresses, normally from sex work advertising websites, will be selected and a pretend appointment booked. Multiple officers will then enter the premises to conduct the check when the door is opened. They are often done in partnership with the immigration officials.

If sex workers feel so persecuted and judged that they don’t even disclose what they do to the most trusted profession in the world, we need to ask ourselves what we’re doing wrong

This all contributes to a climate where, as a nurse specializing in sexual health, I sometimes see patients for multiple appointments before they open up to me about being a sex worker. It has a detrimental effect on my ability to provide them with the care and support they need.
If sex workers feel so persecuted and judged that they don’t even disclose what they do to the most trusted profession in the world, we need to ask ourselves what we’re doing wrong.
Lou-Cahill-1040x585-1024x576.jpg

Sexual health specialist nurse Louise Cahill.

As the law currently stands, sex workers fear prosecution and, in some cases, deportation if they come forward. At the same time, they are uniquely positioned to be a part of the fight against sex trafficking through their access to information.
Decriminalizing their industry would remove this fear, making them safer and helping to bring them in as partners.


powered by Typeform
 
Last edited:


McTell

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 16, 2012
Messages
8,554
The solution is - Licence and tax and health-check these lovely and skilled ladies, and pay them a reward of €2,000 for every trafficked girl they identify to the gardi.

After all, any newly-trafficked ladies are competition. Win-win.
 

Lumpy Talbot

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 30, 2015
Messages
34,425
Twitter
No
Stop treating Ruhama as if they didn't have an agenda of their own. That would be a start. Listening to the people engaged in sex work and what they can tell you about their world would be called 'intelligence gathering' in any sane society.

Irish policy on sex work has never been about protecting sex workers from dangerous pimps or clients. It has always been about reinforcing a moral stance that would never be the solution to anything.
 

Open your mind

New member
Joined
Jul 13, 2020
Messages
2
Within this debate it would be pertinent to highlight that sexual exploitation comes from a (if it can be called so) patriarchal and macho culture, where those with more power, physical or in other aspects, are the head of the game. Sex workers are clear about the kind of path they would like to take, very often this is the only source of income due to the circumstances of one's life.

It is no wonder that many women workers seek the alternative of being independent and not working directly with agencies that do not pay properly what should be paid for the service provided. And yes, sex work is performed consensually.
 

Hillmanhunter1

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 9, 2009
Messages
2,660
Stop treating Ruhama as if they didn't have an agenda of their own. That would be a start. Listening to the people engaged in sex work and what they can tell you about their world would be called 'intelligence gathering' in any sane society.

Irish policy on sex work has never been about protecting sex workers from dangerous pimps or clients. It has always been about reinforcing a moral stance that would never be the solution to anything.
Ruhama is a creation of the religious orders. Specifically the religious orders that gave us the Magdalene Laundries.

"Ruhama ..... was founded as a joint initiative of the Good Shepherd Sisters and Our Lady of Charity Sisters, both of which had a long history of involvement with marginalised women, including those involved in prostitution."
Turn Off Red Light Campaign

Curiously there is no mention of this connection on their website nor in their annual reports/accounts.

Most of their funding comes however from the Exchequer. The published accounts for 2018 show that the biggest donor to Ruhama, granting 325,000, was the Anti-Human Trafficking Unit of the Department of Justice:
 

omgsquared

Well-known member
Joined
May 11, 2019
Messages
645
The solution is - Licence and tax and health-check these lovely and skilled ladies, and pay them a reward of €2,000 for every trafficked girl they identify to the gardi.

After all, any newly-trafficked ladies are competition. Win-win.
The problem then is that it would then be taxable by Government , policy and regulations would have to eb introduced, detailed min and max size of customers members, time on the job, standard operational procedures for coitus etc etc , in both Irish and English and of course the prices would rise to be beyond the means of most people.
Then a government taskforce would have to be established that later would become some overpaid quango with foreign trips to Bangkok, Amsterdam to " Investigate "" how it is done there all to be funded by more tax.
Then the LGBTQXYZ group would complain because the quango would be an overly "heterosexual" orientated and a super special quango would have to be established, perhaps that would later develop into a new Dept of some monstrosity ( sorry Ministry) with a super special junior minister appointed . Of course the BLM movement , immigrant groups , feminist as well would also have their own similar quango(S) . and possibly one for rural Ireland led by Macra., the IRFU ( for upmarket hookers )Or Healy Rae
After a few years when the scandals of the quango member's members or frilly bits were exposed there would have to be a special government commission , board of inquiry that would cost millions, Again to be paid by Taxpayers,
And last not least there would be umpteen challenges in courts , supreme court and it would eventually end up with Chief Justice Clarke..😊
If society is so outraged by statues there is no hope for any significant reforms in this area.
Not worth the hassle
 

Lumpy Talbot

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 30, 2015
Messages
34,425
Twitter
No
Personally I'd say decriminalisation, outreach so that police and social services know if there is someone trafficking or pimping with menaces, and a programme ready to assist street prostitutes off the streets where they want out and are having problems getting out. Voluntary elective prostitution? There is no legislative or prescriptive solution and it will never be eliminated.
 

Dame_Enda

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 14, 2011
Messages
59,675
Its especially daft to equate the 2 when the sex workers are Irish. The numbers prosecuted for trafficking are tiny and do not back up Ruhama's claims of massive levels of human trafficking.
 
Joined
Dec 20, 2018
Messages
19
A number of NGOs in Ireland automatically conflate any sex worker who migrates to sell sexual services as a victim of trafficking. Migrant sex workers should not automatically be conflated with 'trafficked victims. Ruhama's numbers should not and cannot be trusted when looked into they are seen to be a total fabrication for the most part.
 

Lumpy Talbot

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 30, 2015
Messages
34,425
Twitter
No
Statistically there are bound to be a hell of a lot more prostitutes trafficked in the paperwork than there are actually prostitutes being trafficked. I say this because if there was a raid in a house tomorrow somewhere in Dublin and ten women were found to be working as prostitutes then the majority of the prostitutes are never going to admit to being involved in prostitution voluntarily. That way they would be treated as criminals by the system.

Most prostitutes are canny enough to know that the system will treat them not as criminals but as victims as long as they maintain they were being compelled by some mysterious 'Ladislav' who unfortunately wasn't caught up in the Garda swoop.

That way the prostitutes can access the 'victim' system rather than the court system. They'll get anonymity, victim support, rather than being prosecuted. The Gardai, the courts and of course Ruhama will be well aware of this statistical anomaly.

Give people a choice in a raid whether to be treated as a criminal or a victim well, nine out of ten prostitutes won't see that as any different to flattering a john.
 

Lumpy Talbot

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 30, 2015
Messages
34,425
Twitter
No
The net effect is that Ruhama get to maintain that most prostitutes are compelled to a life as a 'fallen woman' in their pre-decimal terminology so they get funded in the budget as a charity dedicated to helping prostitutes escape a life of crime and it doesn't pay them to point out that claims of trafficking are very likely to be massively exaggerated in the state.
 

Patslatt1

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 18, 2009
Messages
5,212
BELLE DE JOUR
Sensible advice like hers Belle de Jour author cautions MPs over rethink of prostitution laws will be ignored by those in government brainwashed in dogmatic Catholic and Protestant sexual morality.
From Wikipedia:
In 2011 Brooke Magnanti published a statistical re-analysis criticising the Lilith Report on Lap Dancing and Striptease in the Borough of Camden,[57] a study which had claimed that sexual crimes increased after the opening of lap dancing venues in the area; the analysis showed this was not the case. The independent London newspaper the Camden New Journal highlighted Magnanti's criticism of the Lilith findings.[58]
 
Last edited:
Joined
Dec 20, 2018
Messages
19
Survey re. Section 7A of the Criminal Law (Sexual Offences) Act 2017

Public Consultation Questionnaire

Survey re. Section 7A of the Criminal Law (Sexual Offences) Act 2017

I recommend people fill this questionnaire out, Ruhama and a number of other church link groups/NGOs, lobbyists for this law will be advising people to complete it/lie in order to direct the review in a way which would result in more criminalization, more Swedish model to put it in the simplest of terms and increased funding given to these organizations. Most of the peer-reviewed research is critical of the Swedish model law or so-called Nordic model law of criminalization.
 
Joined
Dec 20, 2018
Messages
19
The Making of "The Trafficking Problem".

At present, the anti-trafficking movement consists of a diverse coalition of conservative (evangelical) Christians, fundamentalist Islamists, abolitionist feminists, social activists of diverse stripes, a cadre of Hollywood celebrities, and corporate officials (cf. Bernstein, 2014; O’Brien, 2016). In the U.S. alone, possibly hundreds of ideology-based organizations, often privately funded with huge sums of money by right-wing, conservative evangelicals, now exclusively devote themselves to the war against trafficking, which many admit is really a war against prostitution (Magnanti, 2016).

link to full text below



Author information
Archives of Sexual Behavior, 11 Dec 2018,

Europe PMC
 


New Threads

Most Replies

Top Bottom