Connolly in the GPO

Malcolm Redfellow

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 29, 2009
Messages
4,098
Website
redfellow.blogspot.com
Twitter
mredfellow
I'd guess many of us know this image:


Consider the guy in the naff — but definitely mufti — suit, at Connolly's feet. Who he?

The Lady-in-my-Life was last week in the home of one of those Anglo-Irish families, who served both humanity (as medics) and King and Country in military service (until the War of Independence provoked them to leave).

And there, too, was a first-hand family history, from a couple of generations back.

This tells that the grandfather was a British Army surgeon who was detained by the Rebels in the GPO. He, it was attested, was the one who attended to the shrapnel-wounded Connolly — and he was in full military uniform in doing so.

Would anyone like to help to clear up a small wrinkle of history?

Addendum:

Hold the front page! I find this:
The Post Office burned all day Friday, and late in the afternoon, it was decided that it must be abandoned. First Father Flanagan, who had been there all the time, and the girls and a British officer — a Surgeon Lieutenant, who had been doing Red Cross work, were sent to Jervis Street Hospital through an underground passage. Then all the able-bodied men and James Connolly (who had broken his shin) tried to force their way out of the Post Office, to get to Four Courts, where the rebels were still holding out.
Oh, and this:
The Rising, DAY 4: Thursday, April 27th, 1916 ...
20.25: Rebel leader James Connolly is wounded on Middle Abbey Street, and is treated in the GPO by a captured British Army doctor. Hoytes Oil Works explodes, burning down several buildings.
 
Last edited:


venusian

Well-known member
Joined
May 26, 2011
Messages
6,834
I'd guess many of us know this image:


Consider the guy in the naff — but definitely mufti — suit, at Connolly's feet. Who he?

The Lady-in-my-Life was last week in the home of one of those Anglo-Irish families, who served both humanity (as medics) and King and Country in military service (until the War of Independence provoked them to leave).

And there, too, was a first-hand family history, from a couple of generations back.

This tells that the grandfather was a British Army surgeon who was detained by the Rebels in the GPO. He, it was attested, was the one who attended to the shrapnel-wounded Connolly — and he was in full military uniform in doing so.

Would anyone like to help to clear up a small wrinkle of history?
Hope this helps!

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland/irish-news/james-connolly-s-quip-to-british-army-medic-recalled-at-award-ceremony-1.2882679
James Connolly’s quip to British army medic recalled at award ceremony
The Royal College of Physicians recognised the late George Mahony at a ceremony attended by Connolly’s great-grandson James Connolly Heron, Mahony’s grandson Patrick George Walker and members of the Mahony family .

A special posthumous gold medal was yesterday awarded to the British army doctor who treated 1916 leader James Connolly at the GPO after he was hit by a ricochet bullet in the ankle.

The medical officer, a lieutenant, later colonel, was an Irish man, a UCC graduate and a Presbyterian from Cork. He had been arrested by rebels as he emerged from Amiens Street Station (now Connolly Station), intent on visiting his sister in Drumcondra. As Connolly lay injured in the GPO he looked over at Mahony and said, “Do you know, you are the best thing we have captured all week”, it was recalled yesterday.

In the GPO the rebels with a shortage of qualified doctors quickly pressed their prisoner into service as de facto medical officer.
 

runwiththewind

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 12, 2012
Messages
12,577
I'd guess many of us know this image:


Consider the guy in the naff — but definitely mufti — suit, at Connolly's feet. Who he?

The Lady-in-my-Life was last week in the home of one of those Anglo-Irish families, who served both humanity (as medics) and King and Country in military service (until the War of Independence provoked them to leave).

And there, too, was a first-hand family history, from a couple of generations back.

This tells that the grandfather was a British Army surgeon who was detained by the Rebels in the GPO. He, it was attested, was the one who attended to the shrapnel-wounded Connolly — and he was in full military uniform in doing so.

Would anyone like to help to clear up a small wrinkle of history?
Unless they were Indian as it was a young Indian doctor most definitely was in the GPO having been waylaid by the Volunteers. It was this doctor who attended Connolly and Co, for the duration.

There was also a Swede and a Finn, while docked in port, absconded and joined the rebels. The Swede was released but the poor Finn was frogmarced to Frongoch and wasn't released until the following year.

Of course Sweden ruled Finland at the time, hence the release of the Swede but no official sympathy for the Finn.

I bet the poor Finn felt a bit of a turnip for his efforts.
 

Malcolm Redfellow

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 29, 2009
Messages
4,098
Website
redfellow.blogspot.com
Twitter
mredfellow
Hope this helps!

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland/irish-news/james-connolly-s-quip-to-british-army-medic-recalled-at-award-ceremony-1.2882679
James Connolly’s quip to British army medic recalled at award ceremony
The Royal College of Physicians recognised the late George Mahony at a ceremony attended by Connolly’s great-grandson James Connolly Heron, Mahony’s grandson Patrick George Walker and members of the Mahony family .

A special posthumous gold medal was yesterday awarded to the British army doctor who treated 1916 leader James Connolly at the GPO after he was hit by a ricochet bullet in the ankle.

The medical officer, a lieutenant, later colonel, was an Irish man, a UCC graduate and a Presbyterian from Cork. He had been arrested by rebels as he emerged from Amiens Street Station (now Connolly Station), intent on visiting his sister in Drumcondra. As Connolly lay injured in the GPO he looked over at Mahony and said, “Do you know, you are the best thing we have captured all week”, it was recalled yesterday.

In the GPO the rebels with a shortage of qualified doctors quickly pressed their prisoner into service as de facto medical officer.
Snap!

Connection made.

Many thanks.
 

former wesleyan

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 29, 2009
Messages
25,562
I met Patrick Walker when he was a student, working in a summer job in an ice cream factory in Greenford Middx. There were many Irish students working there at the time and they made a huge fuss of him.
 

Malcolm Redfellow

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 29, 2009
Messages
4,098
Website
redfellow.blogspot.com
Twitter
mredfellow
I met Patrick Walker when he was a student, working in a summer job in an ice cream factory in Greenford Middx. There were many Irish students working there at the time and they made a huge fuss of him.
Patrick Walker is now a distinguished London hospital specialist.

For decades we were barely two garden walls apart.

This is an insanely small world. Or, perhaps, that's just the Irish diaspora part of it.
 

Barroso

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 1, 2011
Messages
4,143
There was also a Swede and a Finn, while docked in port, absconded and joined the rebels. The Swede was released but the poor Finn was frogmarced to Frongoch and wasn't released until the following year.

Of course Sweden ruled Finland at the time, hence the release of the Swede but no official sympathy for the Finn.

I bet the poor Finn felt a bit of a turnip for his efforts.
Unfortunately not so.
Finland was handed over to Russia about a century earlier; so the Finn would have been a Russian national, which would explain why he was interned.
 

Malcolm Redfellow

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 29, 2009
Messages
4,098
Website
redfellow.blogspot.com
Twitter
mredfellow
Unfortunately not so.
Finland was handed over to Russia about a century earlier; so the Finn would have been a Russian national, which would explain why he was interned.
Hold on!

1916.

Why would a Russian national be interned by either side in the Dublin Rising?

Just asking, for a friend.
 

former wesleyan

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 29, 2009
Messages
25,562
Patrick Walker is now a distinguished London hospital specialist.

For decades we were barely two garden walls apart.

This is an insanely small world. Or, perhaps, that's just the Irish diaspora part of it.
He has to be in his very late '60's or early '70's if it's the same person, and I'm sure it is. He competed for fame with a lad who turned up who was a descendant of Red Hugh O'Donnell. Mad days Ted !
 

GDPR

1
Joined
Jul 5, 2008
Messages
217,846
He has to be in his very late '60's or early '70's if it's the same person, and I'm sure it is. He competed for fame with a lad who turned up who was a descendant of Red Hugh O'Donnell. Mad days Ted !
Sounds like the guy I knew from years back who always claimed to to be the lover of Lady Chatterley... :D
 

Mick Mac

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 6, 2017
Messages
7,851
Patrick Walker is now a distinguished London hospital specialist.

For decades we were barely two garden walls apart.

This is an insanely small world. Or, perhaps, that's just the Irish diaspora part of it.
Synchronicity?

Great thread by the way
 

runwiththewind

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 12, 2012
Messages
12,577
Unfortunately not so.
Finland was handed over to Russia about a century earlier; so the Finn would have been a Russian national, which would explain why he was interned.
Opps, your right.
 

Malcolm Redfellow

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 29, 2009
Messages
4,098
Website
redfellow.blogspot.com
Twitter
mredfellow
He has to be in his very late '60's or early '70's if it's the same person, and I'm sure it is. He competed for fame with a lad who turned up who was a descendant of Red Hugh O'Donnell. Mad days Ted !
Since he was a near neighbour, and now also a grandfather, from the '70s (and his wife didn't blanch too much when I had bust-up with daughter and threw her 'smalls' out the window), I'd accept that dating.

Good taste in whisk(e)y.
 

former wesleyan

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 29, 2009
Messages
25,562

GabhaDubh

Well-known member
Joined
May 20, 2009
Messages
2,424
A long term friend from Galway and a teetotaler, contended a family friend had I believe the wicker chair from the execution. As you can imagine I have pushed him hard for proof to no avail. Some time back here on P.ie one of our usual posters contended that the English medics had Connolly so heavily medicated that he was not aware.
 

PAGE61

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 19, 2018
Messages
1,171
The Stretcher allegedly used turned up recently, It has been turned into a bedside locker, you could see the number imprinted on part of it.
 

PAGE61

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 19, 2018
Messages
1,171
A long term friend from Galway and a teetotaler, contended a family friend had I believe the wicker chair from the execution. As you can imagine I have pushed him hard for proof to no avail. Some time back here on P.ie one of our usual posters contended that the English medics had Connolly so heavily medicated that he was not aware.
His family visited him not long before and there was no mention of him being medicated, quite the opposite , he even had one of them (Nora) smuggle out his last statement
 

CatullusV

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 9, 2018
Messages
4,661
Since he was a near neighbour, and now also a grandfather, from the '70s (and his wife didn't blanch too much when I had bust-up with daughter and threw her 'smalls' out the window), I'd accept that dating.

Good taste in whisk(e)y.
Was she still wearing them when you through them out?
 


New Threads

Most Replies

Top