Cork - why is it different?

blokesbloke

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Having read the comments on this thread http://www.politics.ie/forum/cork/243738-flood-alert-esb-increased-levels-water-being-released-inniscarra-dam-2.html today, and having been hanging around on this site for a good few years now, I have noticed that Cork seems to be a pretty unique county in Ireland.

Now of course I appreciate that most of the comments about Cork, which seem to centre on its inhabitants thinking the place is special and somehow different from the rest of Ireland, and people from the rest of Ireland mocking this attitude and implying in fact they are inferior as opposed to special, are pretty much tounge-in-cheek.

However, they must come from somewhere.

Is there something historical which makes Cork unique as a county within Ireland?

There must be something feeding this feeling, however jokey it might be, that Cork is somehow different to the rest of Ireland, whether that is a negative or a positive difference.

Could anyone explain to a poor confused Brit?

If I were go to to Ireland, would I notice any real difference between Cork and the rest of Ireland, or is it just a myth really?
 


flavirostris

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They suffer from second city syndrome. Apparently people from Gothenburg in Sweden have this mindset as well. They hate playing second fiddle to Stockholm.
 

blokesbloke

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Yerra, I feel I am not getting entirely serious replies here....
 

'orebel

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Having read the comments on this thread http://www.politics.ie/forum/cork/243738-flood-alert-esb-increased-levels-water-being-released-inniscarra-dam-2.html today, and having been hanging around on this site for a good few years now, I have noticed that Cork seems to be a pretty unique county in Ireland.

Now of course I appreciate that most of the comments about Cork, which seem to centre on its inhabitants thinking the place is special and somehow different from the rest of Ireland, and people from the rest of Ireland mocking this attitude and implying in fact they are inferior as opposed to special, are pretty much tounge-in-cheek.

However, they must come from somewhere.

Is there something historical which makes Cork unique as a county within Ireland?

There must be something feeding this feeling, however jokey it might be, that Cork is somehow different to the rest of Ireland, whether that is a negative or a positive difference.

Could anyone explain to a poor confused Brit?
Have you heard about the Corkman with an inferiority complex?

He thinks he's only as good as everybody else.
 

rubywaxed

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They suffer from second city syndrome. Apparently people from Gothenburg in Sweden have this mindset as well. They hate playing second fiddle to Stockholm.
They should learn to play the violin so....

To be fair though, I do love Cork and the people, sure some of my best friends are Corkonians....not sure if they should be allowed sit at the front of the bus though. Just saying is all..... :)
 

DuineEile

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Centuries of inbreeding. And not just with family. Livestock seem to have featured as well, given some of the cow faces seen on Cork women.


D
 

ruserious

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Indeed so. I just want to know how Cork is different to the rest of Ireland, if indeed it is.
Cork is big enough to have a culture and history to rival a State. Not just a local county like Longford or Carlow.
 

Nudavongs

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Cork people see their city as neat, clean and bijou while they regard Dublin as a sprawling, smelly mess.
 

'orebel

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Indeed so. I just want to know how Cork is different to the rest of Ireland, if indeed it is.
A picture of Cork restaurant Electric was recently shown on a Ryanair ad in France and labelled as Dublin.

A Ryanair spokesman was quoted as saying: "We know it's a picture of Cork, but there's nowhere as beautiful in Dublin as Cork, so we used it to try and get more French passengers to fly to Dublin."
 

Carlos Danger

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Cork is big enough to have a culture and history to rival a State. Not just a local county like Longford or Carlow.
Indeed, a state like Somalia.
 

rubywaxed

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Cork is big enough to have a culture and history to rival a State. Not just a local county like Longford or Carlow.
Like Alabama or Arkansas?

(Really sorry, one of my best friends is from Cork so I am just dusting off some of my comments to her.)
 

artfoley56

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Having read the comments on this thread http://www.politics.ie/forum/cork/243738-flood-alert-esb-increased-levels-water-being-released-inniscarra-dam-2.html today, and having been hanging around on this site for a good few years now, I have noticed that Cork seems to be a pretty unique county in Ireland.

Now of course I appreciate that most of the comments about Cork, which seem to centre on its inhabitants thinking the place is special and somehow different from the rest of Ireland, and people from the rest of Ireland mocking this attitude and implying in fact they are inferior as opposed to special, are pretty much tounge-in-cheek.

However, they must come from somewhere.

Is there something historical which makes Cork unique as a county within Ireland?

There must be something feeding this feeling, however jokey it might be, that Cork is somehow different to the rest of Ireland, whether that is a negative or a positive difference.

Could anyone explain to a poor confused Brit?

If I were go to to Ireland, would I notice any real difference between Cork and the rest of Ireland, or is it just a myth really?
where to start BB

cork has always been a strange place, from siding with perkin warbeck, to pitchcapping and executing fine wexford men in 1798 to hurlers who go on strike.

they have a (very misplaced) sense of superiority and while it's a fine city with some lovely coast, it's full of people who are in turn full of themselves.

I suppose they would be similar to people from chester who look down on the people from wales and liverpool
 

DuineEile

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It's not good natured fun. They genuinely are cúnts. They are pretty good at insulting people from other counties, and in a nasty way. Having encountered and been puzzled by their nasty behaviour over many years, I have given up wondering about it, and I now just reciprocate.

We can all give or take a slagging over a football or hurling match, but Cork people are genuinely nasty.

They are the only set of supporters whose defeats and tragedies, both sporting and personal I genuinely rejoice in. And I mean it. It disgusts me to be part of a nation that includes them.

D
 
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Cork is big. Huge.

I remember once driving in a sports car (yes, me) to a baptism, and realising that as I drove through the Jack Lynch Tunnel I still had a shedload of driving to do to get to the occasion. It was in Skibbereen.

I made it just in time.

Other than that I'm not sure if there's anything particularly different about the place. I lived there for a couple of years. It was the same as almost anywhere else, just had different street names and accents.
 


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