CPSU 'Fingers' Fingerprint Machine

Skypeme

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In yet another example of how the powerful PS unions attempt to extort money from the public purse we have a report that a €20M machine, designed to help reduce benefit fraud, lies idle in the GNIB.

Reported first in November 2008, Civil servants refuse to carry out fingerprinting of immigrants RTE said this evening that the machine still lies idle.

Stripping out the BS in the Tribune report a certain Des Fagan of the CPSU admitted at the time: “Garda management have given some assurances on health and safety but the clerical workers are looking for an allowance to do the work.”

At what point will these people accept that they helped create many of the problems we now face. This little 'hangover' from a time now past is but a small example of the blackmail used by the big unions to squeeze the last cent out of the public purse.

Incidentally, is this the same crowd that recently screwed the taxpayer over ‘Passportgate’?
 


Raketemensch

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In yet another example of how the powerful PS unions attempt to extort money from the public purse we have a report that a €20M machine, designed to help reduce benefit fraud, lies idle in the GNIB.

Reported first in November 2008, here RTE said this evening that the machine still lies idle.

Stripping out the BS in the Tribune report a certain Des Fagan of the CPSU admitted at the time: “Garda management have given some assurances on health and safety but the clerical workers are looking for an allowance to do the work.”

At what point will these people accept that they helped create many of the problems we now face. This little 'hangover' from a time now past is but a small example of the blackmail used by the big unions to squeeze the last cent out of the public purse.

Incidentally, is this the same crowd that recently screwed the taxpayer over ‘Passportgate’?
True, but how can you expect people on regular salaries to turn down the possibility of an increase when the bankers and politicians seem to be doing what the hell they want? There has to be a perception of fairness and shared sacrifice before this will change.
 

Cael

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In yet another example of how the powerful PS unions attempt to extort money from the public purse we have a report that a €20M machine, designed to help reduce benefit fraud, lies idle in the GNIB.

Reported first in November 2008, here RTE said this evening that the machine still lies idle.

Stripping out the BS in the Tribune report a certain Des Fagan of the CPSU admitted at the time: “Garda management have given some assurances on health and safety but the clerical workers are looking for an allowance to do the work.”

At what point will these people accept that they helped create many of the problems we now face. This little 'hangover' from a time now past is but a small example of the blackmail used by the big unions to squeeze the last cent out of the public purse.

Incidentally, is this the same crowd that recently screwed the taxpayer over ‘Passportgate’?
Are the clerical workers doing the work that they are contractually obliged to do?
 

JMcGynty

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True, but how can you expect people on regular salaries to turn down the possibility of an increase when the bankers and politicians seem to be doing what the hell they want? There has to be a perception of fairness and shared sacrifice before this will change.
There also has to be a perception that two wrongs dont make a right
 

Skypeme

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Are the clerical workers doing the work that they are contractually obliged to do?
Have you ever seen a CS contract? Generally the work to be carried out is contained in a job description which for general servive grades covers a multitude. At any rate the union is anxious to hold on to the work but just want more money.

Is that your point?
 

Expose the lot of them

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Personally I think that it is utter bs, imagine clerical workers in the private sector refusing to use some new piece of equipment unless they got more money.

There are serious ramifications for the effective enforcement of our immigration rules in this action.

However, there was some mention in the report that part of the issue was a concern as to whether or not the clerical staff were legally entitled to take fingerprints. I cannot see how this is the case, as far as I am aware they do so already. But even if there was a legal issue that required clarification, it should have been done in 24 hours.
 

Skypeme

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Bankers in Anglo got a pay rise for doing more to clear up their own mess so why shouldn't these workers get more for doing more?
That may well be taken as an admission that the PS/CS workers are as bad as the bankers. But I am sure that was not intended.
 

TonyB

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technopolitics
Brow furrowing....anger level rising...steam pressure building...

Now, if David Banner was a private sector scientist (and if memory serves I think he was) I think we'd have a great big green monster with torn clothes (surprisingly retained around the waist) to deal with. Grrrrrr.
 

Walkman

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The pie's gone and they still want their slice.
This exemplifies the reason we are in the hole we are.
 

Cael

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Have you ever seen a CS contract? Generally the work to be carried out is contained in a job description which for general servive grades covers a multitude. At any rate the union is anxious to hold on to the work but just want more money.

Is that your point?
My point is that if they are doing what they are contractually obliged to do, then what is your complaint?
 

Cael

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Personally I think that it is utter bs, imagine clerical workers in the private sector refusing to use some new piece of equipment unless they got more money.

Why would clerical workers in a private company do work that they are not being paid for?
 

biteback

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True, but how can you expect people on regular salaries to turn down the possibility of an increase when the bankers and politicians seem to be doing what the hell they want? There has to be a perception of fairness and shared sacrifice before this will change.
The machine was purchased in 2006 and it seems this dispute has been going on for four years - long before the banking crisis began.

This yet again sums up all that is wrong with Ireland. And to think that this machine could probably have saved €20m+ if it had been in operation.
 

Skypeme

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....There has to be a perception of fairness and shared sacrifice before this will change.
No arguement with that but it will take a change in mindset for some of the unions and employers.

This happens to be a case where fraud may be avoided and public money saved so it should be resolved fast!
 

Walkman

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Why would clerical workers in a private company do work that they are not being paid for?
Clerical workers in the private sector would be paid for a days work and then the employer would tell them what the work was!
 

Goldencircle

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VTOS are currently trying to introduce a 14point fingerprint sign in.
The students aren't having it for obvious reasons.

Section 2A(1)(a) of the Data Protection Acts states that personal data shall not be processed by a data controller unless the data subject has given his/her consent to the processing,
Consent to the use of a biometric system in places of education should be obtained by means of a positive opt-in on the part of students (and/or their parents or guardians as set out above). An audit trail of the opt-ins should be maintained by the data controller for the duration of each student's enrolment. All students (and/or their parents or guardians as set out above) should, therefore, be given a clear and unambiguous right to opt out of a biometric system without penalty. Furthermore, provision must be made for the withdrawal of consent which had previously been given.
Yet the VEC have told them they know where the door is.

It would be interesting to know who has the contract to supply the machines
 


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