Credit Card Scam Alert

zakalwe

Active member
Joined
Oct 20, 2005
Messages
171
hi there,

don't usually forward these but this is being circulated in the bank i work for:

This one is pretty slick since they provide Y O U with all the information, except the one piece they want.

Note, the callers do not ask for your card number; they already have it. This information is worth reading. By understanding how the VISA & MasterCard Telephone Credit Card Scam works, you'll be better prepared to protect yourself.

One of our employees was called on Wednesday from "VISA", and I was called on Thursday from "MasterCard".

The scam works like this: Person calling says, "This is (name), and I'm calling from the Security and Fraud Department at VISA. My badge number is 12460. Your card has been flagged for an unusual purchase pattern, and I'm calling to verify. This would be on your VISA card which was issued by (name of bank) did you purchase an Anti-Telemarketing Device for £497.99 from a Marketing company based in London?" When you say "No", the caller continues with, "Then we will be issuing a credit to your account. This is a company we have been watching and the charges range from £297 to £497, just under the £500 purchase pattern that flags most cards. Before your next statement, the credit will be sent to (gives you your address), is that correct?"

You say "yes". The caller continues - "I will be starting a fraud investigation. If you have any questions, you should call the 0800 number listed on the back of your card (0800-VISA) and ask for Security.

You will need to refer to this Control Number. The caller then gives you a 6 digit number. "Do you need me to read it again?"

Here's the IMPORTANT part on how the scam works the caller then says,
"I need to verify you are in possession of your card." He'll ask you to "turn your card over and look for some numbers." There are 7 numbers; the first 4 are part of your card number, the next 3 are the security numbers that verify you are the possessor of the card. These are the numbers you sometimes use to make Internet purchases to prove you have the card. The caller will ask you to read the 3 numbers to him. After you tell the caller the 3 numbers, he'll say, "That is correct, I just needed to verify that the card has not been lost or stolen, and that you still have your card. Do you have any other questions?" After you say, "No," the caller then thanks you and states, "Don't hesitate to call back if you do", and hangs up.

You actually say very little, and they never ask for or tell you the Card number. But after we were called on Wednesday, we called back within 20 minutes to ask a question. Are we glad we did! The REAL VISA Security Department told us it was a scam and in the last 15 minutes a new purchase of £497.99 was charged to our card.

Long story - short - we made a real fraud report and closed the VISA account. VISA is reissuing us a new number.
What the scammers want is the 3-digit PIN number on the back of the card.
Don't give it to them. Instead, tell them you'll call VISA or MasterCard directly for verification of their conversation. The real VISA told us that they will never ask for anything on the card as they already know the information since they issued the card! If you give the scammers your 3 Digit PIN Number, you think you're receiving a credit. However, by the time you get your statement you'll see charges for purchases you didn't make, and by then it's almost too late and/or more difficult to actually file a fraud report.

What makes this more remarkable is that on Thursday, I got a call from a "Jason Richardson of MasterCard" with a word-for-word repeat of the VISA scam. This time I didn't let him finish. I hung up! We filed a police report, as instructed by VISA. The police said they are taking several of these reports daily! They also urged us to tell everybody we know that this scam is happening.
 


drbob1972

Active member
Joined
May 1, 2007
Messages
257
so to perpetrate this scam they already know your name, address, telephone no, and presumably your CC number and expiry date, its just the CVV (or CCV) no they are missing ? where did they get all that information from ? this "scam" reporting sounds a bit suspicious to be honest
 

anonymoose

New member
Joined
Nov 22, 2007
Messages
3
Banks do shite like this all the time

This sort of scam is very difficult to detect as the scammer is starting off with all your information and thus appears genuine. If this happens to you then someone has already been very sloppy with your credit card details.

When the banks cold call you with I'm your personal banker etc etc calls they ask for some personal information to verify they're talking to the correct account holder.
I recently got a call from a major Irish Bank lets call them B.I.A. The girl was nice and friendly and identified herself as being from B.I.A bank and did I have time to talk to her about their new "whatever it was". She then asked me to confirm my address to verify who I was. She seemed quite put out when told that I wasn't going to give out personal information to an unsolicited call and that she rang me so she should know who she's talking to.(I'm a bit paranoid). The only assurances she could provide me with were "But I am calling you from B.I.A". The number that popped up was "private" so I had no way of verifying.
Now the call was genuine because I took her name and rang back the customer service line.
It just goes to show you that the Banks security systems are severely lacking.
 

rockofcashel

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 23, 2005
Messages
7,998
Website
www.sinnfein.ie
drbob1972 said:
so to perpetrate this scam they already know your name, address, telephone no, and presumably your CC number and expiry date, its just the CVV (or CCV) no they are missing ? where did they get all that information from ? this "scam" reporting sounds a bit suspicious to be honest
You can all the information you need from a credit card slip, except the CVV number, from discarded receipts at a petrol station
 
Joined
Aug 6, 2007
Messages
22,622
rockofcashel said:
drbob1972 said:
so to perpetrate this scam they already know your name, address, telephone no, and presumably your CC number and expiry date, its just the CVV (or CCV) no they are missing ? where did they get all that information from ? this "scam" reporting sounds a bit suspicious to be honest
You can all the information you need from a credit card slip, except the CVV number, from discarded receipts at a petrol station
Most petrol stations I know print only the last 4 digits of a CC card.
 

NotDevsSon

Active member
Joined
Nov 25, 2007
Messages
174
odie1kanobe said:
rockofcashel said:
drbob1972 said:
so to perpetrate this scam they already know your name, address, telephone no, and presumably your CC number and expiry date, its just the CVV (or CCV) no they are missing ? where did they get all that information from ? this "scam" reporting sounds a bit suspicious to be honest
You can all the information you need from a credit card slip, except the CVV number, from discarded receipts at a petrol station
Most petrol stations I know print only the last 4 digits of a CC card.
That is what they should do. But some do not.

This email is real, BTW. It is not spam. This is going on.
 

Roy Walsh

Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2007
Messages
15
Yeah thank's, got that in an e-mail 1 hr ago, it is a good one.
 

kim chi

Member
Joined
Oct 29, 2007
Messages
45
I am concerned that we are more and more being asked to give that CVV number. It's losing its function as a security element.
 

smiffy

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 11, 2004
Messages
1,279
Website
cedarlounge.wordpress.com
NotDevsSon said:
This email is real, BTW. It is not spam. This is going on.
From here.

Thus, the outlined scheme is certainly plausible. If they already had your credit card, scammers could certainly carry out the schemes described in the message and have most likely done so in the past. That said, I do feel that the message may significantly exaggerate the actual frequency of such scam incidents. The message implies that this scam tactic is a common occurrence. The individuals featured in the message apparently received two such scam calls within as many days and the message claims that police are taking several reports a day about the issue. However, while this warning message has been featured in many legitimate news reports and financial websites, there is little credible information about how often this scam actually occurs. In fact, an article about the email on washingtonpost.com notes that Visa and MasterCard officials "know of no specific person who's been scammed according to the story outlined in the e-mail".

The warning message has now been circulating in several countries for a number of years. In spite of this, at the time of writing, I can still find no reliable reports that described actual occurrences of this particular scam. Moreover, it should be noted that there are now several versions of the message, each with different details. Thus, the specific incidents described in these messages may well be anecdotal. As is common with email warnings of this nature, there is no way of confirming if the specific events outlined in the messages actually occurred or were simply made up as a way of embellishing the scam warning to emphasize its key points.
 

hammer

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 6, 2009
Messages
58,180
Dont open any emails you might receive from DHL.

Have a look at email address "attachment" sent from.

They are bogey in the main.
 


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