Cynical McDonalds ad

The OD

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As I sit here tapping away on the laptop, I just noticed an ad from McDonalds about a father sitting with his daughter over the years, showing her from being a young child, to a snotty teen to a sensible young woman. What really annoyed me was the tag line at the end talking about how precious 'family time' is.

Is this an attempt by McDonalds to try to be topical and cash in on the 'McDonalds Dad'* issue which causes so much heartbreak to men and their children around the country?

I thought I hated McDonalds enough until I noticed this crap.

Thoughts?

* For those who may not be aware of this phenomenon, its the practice where fathers who have very limited access find themselves spending a scant few hours over a weekend with their kids in fast food restaurants and cinemas.
 


CookieMonster

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They should bring the kids to Wagamama.
 

The OD

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Geekzilla said:
Advertising usually is pretty cynical.
But this open? Its very annoying to listen to these soulless suckers of satans **** bang on about family values.

CookieMonster said:
They should bring the kids to Wagamama.
Mmmmm.
 

Akrasia

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The OD said:
As I sit here tapping away on the laptop, I just noticed an ad from McDonalds about a father sitting with his daughter over the years, showing her from being a young child, to a snotty teen to a sensible young woman. What really annoyed me was the tag line at the end talking about how precious 'family time' is.

Is this an attempt by McDonalds to try to be topical and cash in on the 'McDonalds Dad'* issue which causes so much heartbreak to men and their children around the country?

I thought I hated McDonalds enough until I noticed this crap.

Thoughts?

* For those who may not be aware of this phenomenon, its the practice where fathers who have very limited access find themselves spending a scant few hours over a weekend with their kids in fast food restaurants and cinemas.
Yeah, its a disgrace, they market almost exclusively towards children, through parents as a place to bring the kids (stress free with those 'hosts' to entertain the children) and to fathers as a treat and somewhere to spend 'quality time' that the children will remember, and to kids themselves with their cartoon mascot and free toys.

They're not allowed to advertise directly to children anymore because that might attract bad sentiment, they still do it, but in a roundabout way.
 

cyberianpan

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Funny I was looking at that McDonald's ad but I thought it was a disgraceful sexualisation of young children !

cYp
 

Akrasia

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MartinP said:
Children love McDonalds. Happy meals make them happy in my experience.
And so would candyfloss for breakfast.
 

mollox

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The OD said:
I thought I hated McDonalds enough until I noticed this crap.
I've seen the ad but I hadn't registered what they were actually eating.
 

CookieMonster

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mollox said:
The OD said:
I thought I hated McDonalds enough until I noticed this crap.
I've seen the ad but I hadn't registered what they were actually eating.
Well it was an ad for McDonalds.
 

Eddiepops

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I'm with u OD, bad even by advertising standards. First up against the wall when the revolution comes...
 

Skin

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The OD said:
As I sit here tapping away on the laptop, I just noticed an ad from McDonalds about a father sitting with his daughter over the years, showing her from being a young child, to a snotty teen to a sensible young woman. What really annoyed me was the tag line at the end talking about how precious 'family time' is.

Is this an attempt by McDonalds to try to be topical and cash in on the 'McDonalds Dad'* issue which causes so much heartbreak to men and their children around the country?
Or is this an attempt by you to stereotype teens in such a generalised way?

* [quote:n36is3dp]For those who may not be aware of this phenomenon, its the practice where fathers who have very limited access find themselves spending a scant few hours over a weekend with their kids in fast food restaurants and cinemas
[/quote:n36is3dp]


Is it McDonalds fault that fathers have limited access or are they guilty of highlighting the issue?

Seriously if I was a father with onlt a few hours access the last place I would go is to the cinema. At least in McDonalds you can spend time with child, is it a big deal whats on the menu?
 

St Disibod

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Right, I'll declare my background first as it is only fair to do so.

I worked for four years in Mc Donald's, which hardly qualifies me for a Ph.D. in anything, but that may taint my view with some bias or expertise, depending on your views. I have no ties with the company any more, and I own no shares in it- though I should of bought a pile of them; I still eat there, that's all.

To the topic at hand, I think it's nonsense to attack Mc Donald's for being especially immoral. They're quite honest about what they're about- making money, lots of it, and fast. And they're one of the best companies in the world at doing this. For the record, they're major interests are in property rather than food, but that's another story.

What difference does it make that Mc Donald's tries to absorb some of the single-father's market- if that is what this ad is trying to do? And I am not convinced that it is. But if it is, so what? Does it damage society, or the child, or the father, or anyone else if the father brings their child to Mc Donald's rather than Eddie Rockets or Burger King? Okay, it damages Eddie Rockets and Burger King, but that's fair play. This add doesn't go out of it's way to stop fathers walking or fishing with their children. It just encourages them to bring them to Mc Donald's. If anything it's more likely to encourage fathers to spend more time with their children than it is to encourage them to opt for Mc Donald's over fishing, but in how many cases is a Mc Donald's ad required, or sufficient (depending on the situation), to pursuade a father to spend time with their child? Yes, Mc Donald's is trying to eat into the market of time (and money therein spent) of father-child time. But it is not taking away from father-child time to do this. So what is the problem?

In fact, if we regard father-child time as important, I would imagine Mc Donald's is making some contribution to keeping it alive while mobile phones and social networking sites actually threaten it somewhat. I used to hate Sundays in work because they were all family-sized orders. But that tells you something, the Sunday/family meal had moved out from the home into Mc Donald's. I'm traditional enough to prefer the sit-at-home roast. But at least families were still sitting down as families and eating a meal together. If Mc Donald's didn't exist, would they go back to their roasts or would they sit and eat in separate rooms at home with DVD players and computers, etc? Would they bother trying to eat together at all? Who knows?

I just don't think it makes any difference at all- except added business for Mc Donald's. And the best of luck to them.
 

smiffy

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Skin said:
The OD said:
As I sit here tapping away on the laptop, I just noticed an ad from McDonalds about a father sitting with his daughter over the years, showing her from being a young child, to a snotty teen to a sensible young woman. What really annoyed me was the tag line at the end talking about how precious 'family time' is.

Is this an attempt by McDonalds to try to be topical and cash in on the 'McDonalds Dad'* issue which causes so much heartbreak to men and their children around the country?
Or is this an attempt by you to stereotype teens in such a generalised way?
What an odd question. Have you seen the ad? I think the word 'snotty' sums up the girl as depicted during the teenage phase (although words like 'sulky' or 'sullen' would equally apply).
 

Barbarian

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Dory said:
Wagamamma's all the way..........
I'm sure they don't buy as much Irish beef as Micky Macs
 


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