Czech's to elect their Trump today ?

mr_anderson

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In Czech Election, a New Threat to European Unity


He’s a media-wise billionaire used to getting his own way, and promising to run the government like a business. He wants immigrants to stay away. And although his political positions are tricky to pin down, they are tinged with populist and muscular rhetoric.
...
“He is like Trump, really,” said Jiri Pehe, a political analyst and director of New York University in Prague. “You can watch him and see how he suffers in Parliament, forced to listen to other people.”
...
But Mr. Babis has been difficult to pin down on the issues. He opposes sanctions on Russia and seeks more trade with Moscow. He does not want to adopt the euro. He is fiercely resistant to accepting refugees, especially Muslims.
...
For his part, Mr. Babis has gone back and forth on comparisons with Mr. Trump, initially calling himself a much better businessman than the American president but later finding more to like in Mr. Trump’s hard line on immigration.
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/17/world/europe/czech-republic-andrej-babis.html

Have to admit, I had no idea they were even having an election, let alone who the participants were.
But yet again, it's the same story.
People are fine with a little EU.
But bulk at anything more.
And they really don't like the too much interference.

But immigration is once more a hot election topic.
Undoubtedly a direct result of Merkel's open-door policy.

It's looking like her ultimate legacy to the EU will be a line of right-wing European governments.

Will all these right-wing victories threaten the political cohesion of the EU or is it now beyond the effects of national elections ?
 


Dame_Enda

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I think across the EU the people are rejecting elites especially on immigration. They see through the piety of multiculturalism which is used to excuse importation of cheap labour and to enrich landlords and asylum lawyers.
 

razorblade

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I think across the EU the people are rejecting elites especially on immigration. They see through the piety of multiculturalism which is used to excuse importation of cheap labour and to enrich landlords and asylum lawyers.
Not to mention destroys social harmony and identity, people are simply sick of these one worlder globalists pushing their multicultural agenda on the indigenous people of Europe.
 

Kevin Parlon

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The future is bleak for the EU. The more the people revolt against the direction the EU takes, the harder the EU leadership pull against them.

They treat public concerns as perception problems needing to be corrected rather what they are; real concerns held by ordinary, decent people.

The leadership hasn't really been listening for decades and all the predictable and inevitable responses to that (populism, disaffection, instability) are taking shape before our eyes.
 

Kevin Parlon

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A very good discussion by two intellectuals I have a lot of respect for.

Simple summary:

BHL: We're better than populism. We have the ability to lead the world in a more progressive direction. Russia, China and the US want us to fail. We must not fail.

DM: OK, then stop dismissing the vast unease that is spreading around Europe as populist ignorance and a lack of sophistication and start listening to our concerns.

[video=youtube;vm2jTm2U6wE]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vm2jTm2U6wE[/video]
 

valamhic

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In Czech Election, a New Threat to European Unity




https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/17/world/europe/czech-republic-andrej-babis.html

Have to admit, I had no idea they were even having an election, let alone who the participants were.
But yet again, it's the same story.
People are fine with a little EU.
But bulk at anything more.
And they really don't like the too much interference.

But immigration is once more a hot election topic.
Undoubtedly a direct result of Merkel's open-door policy.

It's looking like her ultimate legacy to the EU will be a line of right-wing European governments.

Will all these right-wing victories threaten the political cohesion of the EU or is it now beyond the effects of national elections ?
Agreed. A benefit of these forums is that they keep us up to date with the real news. In order to get it from MSM, we have to listen to hours of adds, propaganda and Joe Duffy type whinging. I knew an election was soon due in Czech but not when. The term populism puzzles me. I thought that when the people voted, it was democracy. Remember that many of the policies being put forward by Trump, Farage and other so called populist candidates were the law 25 years ago. It was the EU introduced the concept of free movement of people and Merkel who expanded that to the middle east and Africa. Why must the will of the people change to suit Merkel? why can't the will of the people remain as they always were?
 

valamhic

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The future is bleak for the EU. The more the people revolt against the direction the EU takes, the harder the EU leadership pull against them.

They treat public concerns as perception problems needing to be corrected rather what they are; real concerns held by ordinary, decent people.

The leadership hasn't really been listening for decades and all the predictable and inevitable responses to that (populism, disaffection, instability) are taking shape before our eyes.
An example of this is the conflict we see in Ireland and other EU countries over energy policy. The European Charter of fundamental Rights gives citizens rights to a good environment and the right to participate in decision making on the environment. Article 10(3) of the Lisbon Treaty does likewise. The EU signed the Aarhus Convention on public participation, access to information and access to justice. The public participation direction, the Strategic Environmental Assessment Directive and the Environmental Impact Assessment Directive provide for assessment of public plans and programmes at the overarching level.

The EIA Directive provides for assessment at the project level. All contain public participation provisions running alone side with the decision making process. Yet no assessments were done at EU level for its Renewable Energy Directive 2009/28/EC. There was not assessment done. At member state level there was no proper assessment done and in Ireland and the UK there was no SEA done for on-shore wind energy.

As a result we see rural uprisings over the shoehorning of massive wind generation plants into communities by commercial wind companies. Their business is to build and sell on immediately. This was a factor in he Brexit vote because rural Britain all vote they were very angry. Read the Aarhus Convention, Regulation 1367/2013 and article 6(4) of Directive 2011/92/EC.
 

hollandia

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The future is bleak for the EU. The more the people revolt against the direction the EU takes, the harder the EU leadership pull against them.

They treat public concerns as perception problems needing to be corrected rather what they are; real concerns held by ordinary, decent people.

The leadership hasn't really been listening for decades and all the predictable and inevitable responses to that (populism, disaffection, instability) are taking shape before our eyes.
Any day now, lol.
 

Mick Mac

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I think across the EU the people are rejecting elites especially on immigration. They see through the piety of multiculturalism which is used to excuse importation of cheap labour and to enrich landlords and asylum lawyers.
:mad: You Socialists hate the neoliberal order
 

Mick Mac

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The future is bleak for the EU. The more the people revolt against the direction the EU takes, the harder the EU leadership pull against them.

They treat public concerns as perception problems needing to be corrected rather what they are; real concerns held by ordinary, decent people.

The leadership hasn't really been listening for decades and all the predictable and inevitable responses to that (populism, disaffection, instability) are taking shape before our eyes.
Perhaps the EU will respond to this current challenge by...
proposing ever greater cooperation and centralisation.
 

benroe

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Perhaps the EU will respond to this current challenge by...
proposing ever greater cooperation and centralisation.

I think the EU is widely perceived as an undemocratic vehicle for the implementation of german policies in europe, run by failed bankers and greedy politicians, and its true that there is a vast disconnect between ordinary citizens and those who have power over them,

This is not helped by the way we elect our representatives, most are elected along domestic party lines or in some cases just popularity contests, its a strange democracy where those elected to a parliament choose their party after they are elected.

I believe that when we joined the then EEC we got great benefit from it, economic and cultural, it ushered in a new liberal age and pushed back the power of religion. But I also believe that their came a point when many of us lost our faith in the institution, for me it was when we were told to vote again on Lisbon and the blatant fear mongering by our own politicians.

For most though I think the point at which they lost their faith in the EU was the open door policy to immigration, unfortunately this has led to an upsurge in right wing extremism and the only concerted anti EU political movement.

I think the only way the EU will survive is if a cross continent political movement is formed dedicated to rolling the EU back into a much looser much less regulated economic union with national borders and domestic currencies.
 

Kevin Parlon

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flavirostris

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It was over for the EU with Brexit. Not everyone seems to have copped this yet.
 

Degeneration X

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In Czech Election, a New Threat to European Unity




https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/17/world/europe/czech-republic-andrej-babis.html

Have to admit, I had no idea they were even having an election, let alone who the participants were.
But yet again, it's the same story.
People are fine with a little EU.
But bulk at anything more.
And they really don't like the too much interference.

But immigration is once more a hot election topic.
Undoubtedly a direct result of Merkel's open-door policy.

It's looking like her ultimate legacy to the EU will be a line of right-wing European governments.

Will all these right-wing victories threaten the political cohesion of the EU or is it now beyond the effects of national elections ?
You have to love the Irony - Brexit was in part triggered by Czechs and other Eastern Europeans flocking West to the UK after 2004. The EU is a dumpster fire.
 

flavirostris

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I think of Brexit as like Luke Skywalker's direct hit on the thermal exhaust port of the Death Star which triggers a chain reaction which destroys the battlestation, except unlike in the movie, the chain reaction takes much longer to destroy the Death Star ( EU ).
 

bob3344

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You have to love the Irony - Brexit was in part triggered by Czechs and other Eastern Europeans flocking West to the UK after 2004. The EU is a dumpster fire.
Main cause was Merkels mass invite & the poster Farage came up with

 

Degeneration X

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I think of Brexit as like Luke Skywalker's direct hit on the thermal exhaust port of the Death Star which triggers a chain reaction which destroys the battlestation, except unlike in the movie, the chain reaction takes much longer to destroy the Death Star ( EU ).
It may turn out (ironically enough) like the British Empire - death by a thousand cuts rather than a sudden collapse.

Question is will certain Nation-States in Europe collapse before the EU does?

- question marks arise over Italy, Spain, Belgium and perhaps the UK itself.

It would be a historical co-incidence if this were to happen exactly 100 years after the dissolution of the Hapsburg, Romanov and Hohenzollern Empires which released a multitude of new states onto the European scene.
 

Degeneration X

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Main cause was Merkels mass invite & the poster Farage came up with

Farage exploited the fears of cheap Eastern European Labour drowning out the native Brits for years before the migration crisis from beyond the EU manifested itself - most Brits I know who voted leave said "the Poles" were a major reason and many were disappointed to learn they would not be going home after Brexit.

Poland is Brexit
 


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