D-Day dawns: How is the crisis in Ireland seen in non Anglophone countries?

He3

Moderator
Joined
Oct 1, 2008
Messages
17,077
There are many Politics.ie readers outside Ireland. On a momentous day for the country it would be good to know how things here are seen from other places, especially non Anglophone countries. While many posters from Germany, France, Switzerland, Norway and Finland have contributed to various threads on the crisis, a thread specially for overseas views might be useful.

A theme of much interest and heated disagreement is whether We did this to ourselves, or whether the cheap interest rates fixed by the ECB made this inevitable. Another is whether (as Finland says) Irish State companies should be pawned against the loans.

What is the local take where you are?
 
Last edited:


reknaw

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 3, 2009
Messages
3,841
There are many Politics.ie readers outside Ireland. On what is likely to be a (another) momentous day for the country it would be good to know how things here are seen from other places, especially non Anglophone countries. While many posters from Germany, France, Switzerland, Norway and Finland have contributed to various threads on the crisis, a thread specially for overseas views might be useful.

A theme of much interest and heated disagreement is whether We did this to ourselves, or whether the cheap interest rates fixed by the ECB made this inevitable. Another is whether (as Finland says) Irish State companies should be pawned against the loans.

What is the local take where you are?

The suggestion by Finnish finance minister Kataja that Ireland pawn assets aroused quite a bit of amusement in intelligent Finnish circles. A good example was a cartoon in the daily Helsingin Sanomat a few days ago, where Kataja muses that a half dozen race courses and a couple of harbours might do the trick --- or "perhaps we could take payment in whiskey".:lol::lol::lol:
 

He3

Moderator
Joined
Oct 1, 2008
Messages
17,077
The suggestion by Finnish finance minister Kataja that Ireland pawn assets aroused quite a bit of amusement in intelligent Finnish circles. A good example was a cartoon in the daily Helsingin Sanomat a few days ago, where Kataja muses that a half dozen race courses and a couple of harbours might do the trick --- or "perhaps we could take payment in whiskey".:lol::lol::lol:

Sorry to report that here whisky distilling is not in State hands. Would you Finns settle for the ports?
 

Insole

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 3, 2010
Messages
516
Looking at the international press from abroad, Ireland is seen as having been very badly managed and is now being handed over to the vultures. There's a lot of sympathy and fear of who is going to be hit next.

Well done on the protest yesterday. It beat the Korean crisis on lots of channels and showed the Irish public "growing a pair"!
 

bprob

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 8, 2009
Messages
678
Sorry to report that here whisky distilling is not in State hands. Would you Finns settle for the ports?
rename the treaty ports as the bailout ports?:p

i have a friend near Birmingham. He told me yesterday that we are an absolute laughing stock at his workplace, and every time we are mentioned on the radio, someone passes some witty comment. it is more like gallows humour than out of spite.
no specific resistance to helping us out though. they can see rationale that it is in british interest to have a strong irish economy
 

He3

Moderator
Joined
Oct 1, 2008
Messages
17,077
Looking at the international press from abroad, Ireland is seen as having been very badly managed and is now being handed over to the vultures. There's a lot of sympathy and fear of who is going to be hit next.

Well done on the protest yesterday. It beat the Korean crisis on lots of channels and showed the Irish public "growing a pair"!

Sympathy and fear are two stocks on the rise.
 

Valerius

New member
Joined
Nov 28, 2010
Messages
1
Hailing from Austria here... first of all: this is one cool politics forum. I love how serious a whole variety of topics are discussed here. Political discourse here is different. Low brow. Thanks to the country's largest newspaper, all bad things come a. from those filthy, filthy foreigners or b. from that filthy, filthy EU. Yep. It's right wing nut land here.

It's a pleasure to read the thoughts of real, mostly intelligent people here in contrast to what the media feeds us.

Anyway, on topic. I have loved the Irish since I had a girlfriend from Kilkenny long ago. I'm terribly sorry about what's happening. But then, knowing the Irish, I know you'll come out stronger. Sympathy here, but no fear for the country's future or my own plans to maybe move there for a few years.

In short, I'd rather pay for an Irish bailout than some corrupt stupidity by my own government. Right now they are at drilling useless holes into mountains for 100 train passengers per day.

I do, however, have some dark thoughts about the future in general. Those past months/years have been an example how abso-frakking-lutely nothing one can do about economic troubles. I mean, bring on a Russian invasion (sorry, Russians, that's how I grew up ;)) - I can take a rifle and do my best. Bring on some other physical disaster and I can probably find a solution. But that? Not a chance. Makes one feel helpless.

I do think we'll be getting through the current crisis. Together, as Europeans. But the hits keep getting closer and they are coming more often. Somehow I'm starting to think that the 'future' is not not getting a pension when I can retire at 75 but it's a clean rifle and a vegetable garden for when the next 'crisis' comes knocking.
 

Padraigin

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 22, 2006
Messages
628
The whole international monetary sytem is a house of cards that is teetering. Every "solution" just makes things worse and more unstable.

What everyone needs is a fresh start. Back to basics.

Countries need to opt out of all international organizations and start getting their own countries, one by one, back on a solid financial footing.

If Ireland can have the courage to default instead of sinking ever deeper into the mire of debt, it can have a head start on financial stability.

Getting outside the internatonal financial monetary system would actually be a good thing. That one is going to fall soon, and being clear when it does is the best place to be.
 

He3

Moderator
Joined
Oct 1, 2008
Messages
17,077
Hailing from Austria here... first of all: this is one cool politics forum. I love how serious a whole variety of topics are discussed here. Political discourse here is different. Low brow. Thanks to the country's largest newspaper, all bad things come a. from those filthy, filthy foreigners or b. from that filthy, filthy EU. Yep. It's right wing nut land here.

It's a pleasure to read the thoughts of real, mostly intelligent people here in contrast to what the media feeds us.

Anyway, on topic. I have loved the Irish since I had a girlfriend from Kilkenny long ago. I'm terribly sorry about what's happening. But then, knowing the Irish, I know you'll come out stronger. Sympathy here, but no fear for the country's future or my own plans to maybe move there for a few years.

In short, I'd rather pay for an Irish bailout than some corrupt stupidity by my own government. Right now they are at drilling useless holes into mountains for 100 train passengers per day.

I do, however, have some dark thoughts about the future in general. Those past months/years have been an example how abso-frakking-lutely nothing one can do about economic troubles. I mean, bring on a Russian invasion (sorry, Russians, that's how I grew up ;)) - I can take a rifle and do my best. Bring on some other physical disaster and I can probably find a solution. But that? Not a chance. Makes one feel helpless.

I do think we'll be getting through the current crisis. Together, as Europeans. But the hits keep getting closer and they are coming more often. Somehow I'm starting to think that the 'future' is not not getting a pension when I can retire at 75 but it's a clean rifle and a vegetable garden for when the next 'crisis' comes knocking.


Welcome Valerius, and thanks!
 


New Threads

Popular Threads

Most Replies

Top