David Milliband leaves UK politics

borntorum

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On Sky News now, David Milliband has announced that he is quitting frontline politics.

Saying that he needs to recharge his batteries, and Labour needs 'one clear leader'.

David Miliband today confirmed he would not stand for the shadow cabinet to avoid "constant comparison" with his brother Ed, the new Labour leader.

The shadow foreign secretary and MP for South Shields sent a letter to his constituency party chair, Alan Donnelly, to confirm he had decided against adding his name to the shadow cabinet elections to give the new leader space to set out his direction.
David Miliband quits frontline politics | Politics | guardian.co.uk
 


kerdasi amaq

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With any luck he'll make aliyah and run for the Knesset.
 

He3

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Good decision

Interesting family
 

Mushroom

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He looks like a broken man.

Mind you, he could yet cause some damage for Red Ted from the Labour backbenches.
 

anons

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A big loss for the Labour Party but he makes a fair point about the attention his relationship would Ed would receive in the media if he were to continue.

Hope to see him back on the front bench in the future.
 

Future

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Its a weird system of electing a leader. I know the unions have a big role within Labour but David Milliband won the support of members and the parliamentary party.

Its a lurch to the left and hard to see Labour getting elected next time round.

Big loss
 

Interista

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He looks like a broken man.
Not surprising really.

Aside from the fact that it's a huge setback to his career, it must be humiliating when your baby brother snatches the job that for years you had considered pretty much yours for the taking.
 

d7bohs

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Understandable, but a bad decision, I think.

He should, for his own sake and the sake of his party, taken a front bench job for a bit, while looking for an EU/ UN/ etc. kind of gig - then he could leave domestic politics for the duration of his bro's reign, before returning as an elder statesman to take on one of the big offices of state under the next Labour government, led by someone else.

Brothers have managed to serve, one under the other, before: Brutons here, Kennedys in the US. It can't be easy, but a lot of things aren't easy.
 

Interista

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He should, for his own sake and the sake of his party, taken a front bench job for a bit, while looking for an EU/ UN/ etc. kind of gig - then he could leave domestic politics for the duration of his bro's reign, before returning as an elder statesman to take on one of the big offices of state under the next Labour government, led by someone else.
Oh, I wouldn't worry too much about Dave. I'm sure that as I type these words, his mentor Tony is busy arranging some lucrative 'job' for him in the good ol' US of A, where Miliband's wife and sons were born. I'm sure Hilary Clinton might be prepared to um, lend a hand as well!

Brothers have managed to serve, one under the other, before: Brutons here, Kennedys in the US. It can't be easy, but a lot of things aren't easy.
Yes, but the circumstances here are a bit different. David was not only the older brother but also by far the more senior. He was seen as the natural successor to Brown and it was generally considered that the job was pretty much his for the asking - until baby bro came around and spoiled it all. That's his right, of course, and he won fair and square, but I do think it would have been hard for David to continue to stay in front line politics in the circumstances.
 

Kevin Doyle

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Its a weird system of electing a leader. I know the unions have a big role within Labour but David Milliband won the support of members and the parliamentary party.

Its a lurch to the left and hard to see Labour getting elected next time round.

Big loss
Are you kidding, after the devestating cuts of Maceroon hit home, Labour will be a shoe in.
 

redhead101

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Big loss. I'd be surprised if this turned out to be permanent arrangement.

Thanking my lucky stars that Irish Labour Party is not controlled by the unions.
 

Future

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Are you kidding, after the devestating cuts of Maceroon hit home, Labour will be a shoe in.
Mr Red Ed is already talking about increases taxes and who will that hit the most only the middle class supporters that they lost in the previous election?

Yes the cuts are severe but many voters even at the time of the next election could still lay blame at Labour for creating the problem in the first place.
 

dónal na geallaí

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Big loss. I'd be surprised if this turned out to be permanent arrangement.

Thanking my lucky stars that Irish Labour Party is not controlled by the unions.
Neither is the British Labour Party.There is no bloc vote;individual union members voted for Ed Milliband.Some union leaders recommended him but how you vote is up to the individual.I know- I voted against both Smith and Blair through my then union (Nupe,called something snazzier now) but to no avail.In the past the union bloc vote got old fashioned rightwing social democrat types elected to the shadow cabinet time after time.Some of the old union bosses were Tories,so thats not very surprising really.Some indeed were working for MI5 ,ach sin scéal eile.
 

Rocky

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To begin with I would have far preferred if David had won, but I think he is probably right in this. Naturally losing the election for leader after being the clear favourite most have been very hard for him and there has to be bitterness towards his brother after it. It's human nature and on that basis he's right to step back for a while and recover from the defeat and he will be better for it. I have no doubt he will be back again and when he is he will be better for it after taking the break.
 

redhead101

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Neither is the British Labour Party.There is no bloc vote;individual union members voted for Ed Milliband.Some union leaders recommended him but how you vote is up to the individual.
Fair enough but Union members here are not members of the Labour Party unless they go along to their local party branch and sign up.
 

mr_anderson

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Is this the first time that a politician has stepped down to spend less time with his family ? :p
 


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