Dear parents: Don’t be @$$holes about food allergies

L'Chaim

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There's quite a little debate going on in the comments section about this article/blog. Basically the writer is saying that if one child in a class is allergic to some food ingredient then no child in the class should have it. Someone else says if it is so easy to explain to a "3 year old" why they can't have a specific food, why can't they just explain to the allergic child to not touch or eat ANY food other than what he is sent to school with?
Dear parents: Don't be @$$holes about food allergies | Sarah Tuttle-Singer | The Blogs | The Times of Israel

An interesting debate. Where would you stand on this issue, if it was an issue, in a class your child was in
 


Henry94.

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I'd happily make the small adjustment required to protect the child with the allergies.
 
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There's quite a little debate going on in the comments section about this article/blog. Basically the writer is saying that if one child in a class is allergic to some food ingredient then no child in the class should have it. Someone else says if it is so easy to explain to a "3 year old" why they can't have a specific food, why can't they just explain to the allergic child to not touch or eat ANY food other than what he is sent to school with?
Dear parents: Don't be @$$holes about food allergies | Sarah Tuttle-Singer | The Blogs | The Times of Israel

An interesting debate. Where would you stand on this issue, if it was an issue, in a class your child was in
I seem to recall that there is one form of the peanut allergy where the sensitivity is such that a reaction can occur if the sufferer is in the presence of someone who had eaten peanuts in the previous week, although that may have been slightly exaggerated by them. At the same time, there is research showing that graduated exposure to increasing (yet small) amounts of the allergen can help to rid the allergy. I'd be bound by the advice the advice of a doctor and make sure that school has epi-pens and knows how to use them.
 

Spanner Island

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There's quite a little debate going on in the comments section about this article/blog. Basically the writer is saying that if one child in a class is allergic to some food ingredient then no child in the class should have it. Someone else says if it is so easy to explain to a "3 year old" why they can't have a specific food, why can't they just explain to the allergic child to not touch or eat ANY food other than what he is sent to school with?
Dear parents: Don't be @$$holes about food allergies | Sarah Tuttle-Singer | The Blogs | The Times of Israel

An interesting debate. Where would you stand on this issue, if it was an issue, in a class your child was in
I'd go along with the sentiment in bold myself.

And if they're really allergic and the parents are really worried there's always home schooling.
 

Paddy Sarkozy

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I went to school from the age of four up to eighteen, fourteen years. In all that time I never heard the word allergy mentioned. Nobody ever got a peanut allergy, nobody ever had skin allergy, allergy just was not an issue! And I never remember any child being sick for unexplained reasons like allergy. We need to knock this allergy nonsense on the head. Nowadays it is even has a new word, sensitisation, but my call is much of it is down to parents raising children in cotton wool being far too sensitive about every possible thing that their darlings might not like. Hot on the heels of the snowflake generation, we now have the peanut generation.
 
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I went to school from the age of four up to eighteen, fourteen years. In all that time I never heard the word allergy mentioned. Nobody ever got a peanut allergy, nobody ever had skin allergy, allergy just was not an issue! And I never remember any child being sick for unexplained reasons like allergy. We need to knock this allergy nonsense on the head. Nowadays it is even has a new word, sensitisation, but my call is much of it is down to parents raising children in cotton wool being far too sensitive about every possible thing that their darlings might not like. Hot on the heels of the snowflake generation, we now have the peanut generation.
I'm not sure where or when you went to school, but I remember very well having scratch and pr1ck tests at school in the 60s/70s.

Tell the parents of the girl who died a couple of years ago on O'Connell Street for the want of an epi-pen that peanut allergy isn't a thing.
 
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Paddy Sarkozy

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I'm not sure where or when you went to school, but I remember very well having scratch and ****************************** tests at school in the 60s/70s.

Tell the parents of the girl who died a couple of years ago on O'Connell Street for the want of an epi-pen that peanut allergy isn't a thing.
Allergy now is a real thing, I didn't mean to rubbish it entirely. But it's interesting you mention a girl having peanut allergy. In my life the only cases of allergy I have heard of have been women and girls. So maybe there is a gender dimension to allergy, which might require boys to be educated separately to girls but this would upset the education theorists who insist instead of whole classes submitting to avoidance of the allergens that affect a minority.
 
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milipod

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I went to school from the age of four up to eighteen, fourteen years. In all that time I never heard the word allergy mentioned. Nobody ever got a peanut allergy, nobody ever had skin allergy, allergy just was not an issue! And I never remember any child being sick for unexplained reasons like allergy. We need to knock this allergy nonsense on the head. Nowadays it is even has a new word, sensitisation, but my call is much of it is down to parents raising children in cotton wool being far too sensitive about every possible thing that their darlings might not like. Hot on the heels of the snowflake generation, we now have the peanut generation.
Was it a hedge school.
 
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Allergy now is a real thing, I didn't mean to rubbish it entirely. But it's interesting you mention a girl having peanut allergy. In my life the only cases of allergy I have heard of have been women and girls. So maybe there is a gender dimension to allergy, which might require boys to be educated separately to girls but this would upset the education theorists who insist instead of whole classes submitting to avoidance of the allergens that affect a minority.
I mentioned an example of someone who died as a result of an allergy. The gender was irrelevant. My nephew has the same one and has been hospitalised twice with it - although he appears to be more resilient now.

I can vouch for having had pr1ck and scratch tests on more than one occasion at school way back when. They seemed to be a perfectly standard practice.
 

Felixness

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So are people seriously saying that because 1 child in a classroom can't have a particular food that no child in the class should be able to bring that food to school? What is the matter with people?
 

Paddy Sarkozy

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So are people seriously saying that because 1 child in a classroom can't have a particular food that no child in the class should be able to bring that food to school? What is the matter with people?
It used to be kids could eat whatever in class provided they gave some to all the other kids. How times have changed!
 
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So are people seriously saying that because 1 child in a classroom can't have a particular food that no child in the class should be able to bring that food to school? What is the matter with people?
Where is that being said?

Reading the article, it seems to about food which is to be shared - not simply a packed lunch.
 

ant

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Apparently nut allergies exist because the grandmother of the affected child never ate nuts...then never gave her child nuts.

Expectant mothers should eat nuts.
 

Toland

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There's quite a little debate going on in the comments section about this article/blog. Basically the writer is saying that if one child in a class is allergic to some food ingredient then no child in the class should have it. Someone else says if it is so easy to explain to a "3 year old" why they can't have a specific food, why can't they just explain to the allergic child to not touch or eat ANY food other than what he is sent to school with?
Dear parents: Don't be @$$holes about food allergies | Sarah Tuttle-Singer | The Blogs | The Times of Israel

An interesting debate. Where would you stand on this issue, if it was an issue, in a class your child was in
A very relevant issue on this matter is the question of whether or not food allergies among children are being massively exaggerated by both the media and medics with an interest in the subject.

For and against: Are the dangers of childhood food allergy exaggerated?
 

eoghanacht

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Our youngest is lactose intolerant.

In the past our eldest has returned home from school asking for us to no longer give him nutella for lunch as their were two brothers starting a fresh with "severe" but allergies, I thought that odd.

Then this year we received an e mail saying a student was starting this year with an allergy to vomit so severe that they asked us not to send our child to school if anyone in the house vomited.

Allergic to the body's own defence mechanism.
 

dizillusioned

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Allergy now is a real thing, I didn't mean to rubbish it entirely. But it's interesting you mention a girl having peanut allergy. In my life the only cases of allergy I have heard of have been women and girls. So maybe there is a gender dimension to allergy, which might require boys to be educated separately to girls but this would upset the education theorists who insist instead of whole classes submitting to avoidance of the allergens that affect a minority.
Paddy you really need to get out more.

I am severely allergic to peanuts, one bite and the swelling starts I found out when I was a child. In later life I also found out that I am allergic to shrimps. Love the taste of shrimp and during a shrimp meal when I was 17 I actually woke up in hospital having collapsed into the plate of said shrimp.

I have also become coeliac later in life, so now I cannot have gluten, shrimp and am totally deprived.
 

Gin Soaked

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Nut allergies are real and utterly life threatening.

Many other allergies are bs.

Our precautions should be appropriate to the circumstances.
 

*EPIC SUCCESS*

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I seem to recall that there is one form of the peanut allergy where the sensitivity is such that a reaction can occur if the sufferer is in the presence of someone who had eaten peanuts in the previous week, although that may have been slightly exaggerated by them. At the same time, there is research showing that graduated exposure to increasing (yet small) amounts of the allergen can help to rid the allergy. I'd be bound by the advice the advice of a doctor and make sure that school has epi-pens and knows how to use them.
That's something you don't really hear much about? I never consider the possibility that one could build up a tolerance?

As for it being a 'real thing', I worked with a guy who started to feel unwell if close to peanuts - it was definitely a very real thing, someone accidentally left the end of a bag in the waste paper bin under his desk and within 5 minutes of sitting down he was looking quite ill and was red faced, wheezing and so on. He got up to get some air, not knowing the bag was there, went outside for a few minutes, was OK, came back, symptoms came on again, left, they resided - eventually we checked his desk, found the bag and dumped it outside. Opened some windows and he moved to another office for an hour, came back and was OK.

There is no way the flushed face, swelling around his lips and wheezing was 'all in his head' by any means.
 

Toland

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I mentioned an example of someone who died as a result of an allergy. The gender was irrelevant. My nephew has the same one and has been hospitalised twice with it - although he appears to be more resilient now.

I can vouch for having had pr1ck and scratch tests on more than one occasion at school way back when. They seemed to be a perfectly standard practice.
They're great. A lot of children suffer with less serious allergies that go without diagnosis and can be treated by a course of desensitization treatment.
 


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