'Death Island': Britain's concentration camp

LookWhoItIs

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As Irish we should consider ourselves fortunate not to have ended up in camps.

"With few washing facilities and no change of clothes, inmates soon became infested with lice. Typhus spread like wildfire. Overall, about 1,000 people were imprisoned here and up to 300 died - either as a result of disease, or because they were shot or tortured to death.
When we visit it is a muggy summer afternoon and the air is thick with midges. I dread to think what it would be like here during an Arctic winter when temperatures can reach -30C (-22F). Signs from the now abandoned museum point out the "ice cells", left open to the elements, where rebellious prisoners were punished and either perished or lost limbs to frostbite.
Pavel Rasskazov, a radical journalist, spent several months on Mudyug. In his Prison Memoirs, which became a well-known and much-studied text in the Soviet era, he documented the appalling conditions and the lack of food.
He describes how, when dried bread was distributed in the morning, "starving, angry men with greedy eyes crawled all over the filthy, damp floor, full of spit, picking up each and every crumb"."





N0.. not a WW2 German camp, but a Brit run camp in Europe in 1919. Now we know where Hitler and Stalin got the idea from















 
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Cruimh

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Sigh - what a crappy OP - have you heard of copyright?

You lifted from this: 'Death Island': Britain's 'concentration camp' in Russia - BBC News

and of course you not only omit a link, but forget to mention that

Back in the Soviet era, boatloads of day trippers came to the island of Mudyug to visit a museum. It was located among the remains of a prison camp - one very different from the scores of old Gulag outposts scattered across the Russian north and Siberia. For one thing, it was set up as far back as 1918. Even more remarkably, the people in charge were were British and French.
 

parentheses

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Well, it has been argued Hitler was inspired to set up his concentration camps by the concentration camps and "native reservations" of the English-speaking world.

He was in some ways an admirer of the English.
 

RasherHash

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As Irish we should consider ourselves fortunate not to have ended up in camps.

"With few washing facilities and no change of clothes, inmates soon became infested with lice. Typhus spread like wildfire. Overall, about 1,000 people were imprisoned here and up to 300 died - either as a result of disease, or because they were shot or tortured to death.
When we visit it is a muggy summer afternoon and the air is thick with midges. I dread to think what it would be like here during an Arctic winter when temperatures can reach -30C (-22F). Signs from the now abandoned museum point out the "ice cells", left open to the elements, where rebellious prisoners were punished and either perished or lost limbs to frostbite.
Pavel Rasskazov, a radical journalist, spent several months on Mudyug. In his Prison Memoirs, which became a well-known and much-studied text in the Soviet era, he documented the appalling conditions and the lack of food.
He describes how, when dried bread was distributed in the morning, "starving, angry men with greedy eyes crawled all over the filthy, damp floor, full of spit, picking up each and every crumb"."





N0.. not a WW2 German camp, but a Brit run camp in Europe in 1919. Now we know where Hitler and Stalin got the idea from















You're not supposed to say this, this is antisemitic.

Damn you to hell :)
 

razorblade

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Well, it has been argued Hitler was inspired to set up his concentration camps by the concentration camps and "native reservations" of the English-speaking world.

He was in some ways an admirer of the English.
True he never really wanted to fight them, he actually admired them and their empire and sought to emulate it with his own.
 

LookWhoItIs

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True he never really wanted to fight them, he actually admired them and their empire and sought to emulate it with his own.
Churchill gets a mention - another idea of his was gassing the kurds

"I am strongly in favour of using poisoned gas against uncivilised tribes,"
 

Degeneration X

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Eire1976

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The Germans also used them in South West Africa (modern day Namimba) when they were putting down a native rebellion.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herero_and_Namaqua_genocide

The Germans were directly inspired by the British model from across the border in South Africa.
They knew full well what would happen when people are denied clean conditions and proper rations.

The reports of their actions in Ireland in the 1840's were well known
 

galteeman

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Spirit Of Newgrange

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i always thought it was invented by the Brits during the Boer War.
 

IrishFreedom

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A few hundred Bolsheviks dead from Typhus , whats the issue here?

Its a great shame the allied intervention and support for the white Russians was not greater and bolshevism could have wiped out at birth.
The place was on the battlefield not holing up people in horrendous camps. That said the White Russians for all their faults could’ve been reformed given the chance of victory.
 


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