Defence Forces EOD squad gets National Courage Award



justme1

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I reckon what most people think is that they serve few if any purposes for this country,bar riding behind armed gardai who are behind cash in transit vans,and going on 'Tour of Duty' peace keeping which they are well paid for.
Last January when the country came to a standstill with the weather i expected to see the majority of our 'Defence forces' out salting/gritting the roads and not sitting in the Curragh or whatever barracks preparing for their next cash in transit drive,but sure we couldn't have them doing that kind of thing better to keep them on standby just in case the vikings arrive!
 

former wesleyan

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I reckon what most people think is that they serve few if any purposes for this country,bar riding behind armed gardai who are behind cash in transit vans,and going on 'Tour of Duty' peace keeping which they are well paid for.
Last January when the country came to a standstill with the weather i expected to see the majority of our 'Defence forces' out salting/gritting the roads and not sitting in the Curragh or whatever barracks preparing for their next cash in transit drive,but sure we couldn't have them doing that kind of thing better to keep them on standby just in case the vikings arrive!
What armed gardai ? What salt or grit ? There aren't armed gards on CIT and there wasn't any grit/salt. And the DF act on the instruction of the Minister of Defence and not on the spur of the moment. What about the past ten years would have you believe that the Government would utilise anything anywhere with any degree of efficiency? Are you calling from another planet ?
 

Luke McFadden

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Well done EOD!

it takes a man of exceptional courage to go within an asse's roar of explosives so the EOD are fantastic. I seen an infantry captain once walking up to an unexploded grenade and calmly, as if wandering about his own front lawn, take a charge of plastic explosive and place it beside the grenade on a fuse. Then he walked, cool as the proverbial breeze, back to the shelter of a trench and the device went off and blew the unexploded grenade. It mightn't sound much but at any time that grenade could have went off and killed him stone dead.

I think we should remember Lt Murphy too at this moment in time, as brave an Irishman as you'd find, an EOD specialist who saved many lives in Lebanon with his bravery and skill and who died as a young man whilst detonating yet another roadside device in Lebanon ... Pure guts ... well done EOD!
 

Cael

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Time to disband the free state army. What does an offshore colony need an army for?
 

fluffykontbiscuits

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Time to disband the free state army. What does an offshore colony need an army for?
I'd imagine to stop trawlers in our waters fishing illegally, stop the RA scum from bombing us and in times of catastrophe but thats just my opinion. Besides didnt USSR have a wonderful army ?
 

The Fusilier

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Time to disband the free state army. What does an offshore colony need an army for?
To put manners on your dissident colleagues should the need arise is a sufficient reason, I believe.
 

Dohville

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I reckon what most people think is that they serve few if any purposes for this country,bar riding behind armed gardai who are behind cash in transit vans,and going on 'Tour of Duty' peace keeping which they are well paid for.
Last January when the country came to a standstill with the weather i expected to see the majority of our 'Defence forces' out salting/gritting the roads and not sitting in the Curragh or whatever barracks preparing for their next cash in transit drive,but sure we couldn't have them doing that kind of thing better to keep them on standby just in case the vikings arrive!
Last year in Cork the army(not the local authority) and the Naval service were the ones bringing drinking water to the people of cork, and repairing the water treatment plant.

But i suppose if you wear the blinkers you'll see what you want to see, or not see.
 

former wesleyan

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it takes a man of exceptional courage to go within an asse's roar of explosives so the EOD are fantastic. I seen an infantry captain once walking up to an unexploded grenade and calmly, as if wandering about his own front lawn, take a charge of plastic explosive and place it beside the grenade on a fuse. Then he walked, cool as the proverbial breeze, back to the shelter of a trench and the device went off and blew the unexploded grenade. It mightn't sound much but at any time that grenade could have went off and killed him stone dead.

I think we should remember Lt Murphy too at this moment in time, as brave an Irishman as you'd find, an EOD specialist who saved many lives in Lebanon with his bravery and skill and who died as a young man whilst detonating yet another roadside device in Lebanon ... Pure guts ... well done EOD!
Very true... not a Yossir job at all !1 And not to forget the lads in Afghanistan who are up close and personal with the aftermath of some of the craftiest bombmakers from Iran and Pakistan as they learn the latest tricks to pass on to other U.N. troops.
 

antares

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I saw an irish EOD guy in the Leb once who dug out a UX 155mm shell out of the ground with a shovel (in 35 degree heat).

The thing that really got me was how calm he was when he could have been vapourized in a millisecond.

He works for Dublin Fire Brigade now, so I guess he's a glutton for punishment. Brave guy.
 

Aspherical123

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"They have defused bombs at home and overseas and set international standards in the study of defusing explosives used by terrorists"

BS


And Insulting considering how many ordnance officers have been killed in Afghanistan.

Infact NATO forces with such EOD units in Afghanistan or previously Iraq are far more technically experienced.

Things have moved on massively in the last 10 yrs.

People like this guy, below set the standards. He had deactivated more then 50 IEDs on one tour.


"Married Cpt Shepherd, 28, from Lincoln, was a veteran of the Iraq war who worked as a bomb disposal expert in Greater London before travelling to Afghanistan.

A member of the Joint Force Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group and described as one of the best bomb disposal experts in the Armed Forces, he was killed on patrol in central Helmand on Monday afternoon.

During his tour in Afghanistan, he dealt with over 50 devices and was taking part in Operation Panther's Claw, a major offensive to seize and hold areas north of Lashkar Gah, the provincial capital, before presidential elections in August. "
 
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tellis1

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"They have defused bombs at home and overseas and set international standards in the study of defusing explosives used by terrorists"

BS


And Insulting considering how many ordnance officers have been killed in Afghanistan.

Infact NATO forces with such EOD units in Afghanistan or previously Iraq are far more technically experienced.

Things have moved on massively in the last 10 yrs.

People like this guy, below set the standards. He had deactivated more then 50 IEDs on one tour.


"Married Cpt Shepherd, 28, from Lincoln, was a veteran of the Iraq war who worked as a bomb disposal expert in Greater London before travelling to Afghanistan.

A member of the Joint Force Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group and described as one of the best bomb disposal experts in the Armed Forces, he was killed on patrol in central Helmand on Monday afternoon.

During his tour in Afghanistan, he dealt with over 50 devices and was taking part in Operation Panther's Claw, a major offensive to seize and hold areas north of Lashkar Gah, the provincial capital, before presidential elections in August. "
Ehhh Duhhhh, we do have DF ordnance officers in Afghanistan emloyed in counter IED, you dont think that they learn anything from the Afghan experience and bring it home.
 

Aspherical123

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Ehhh Duhhhh, we do have DF ordnance officers in Afghanistan emloyed in counter IED, you dont think that they learn anything from the Afghan experience and bring it home.
There are 7 Irish defence forces personal out there, none are involved in actively defussing IEDs on the ground.

How is that setting the international standard as the article claims ?

The Irish army does not even possses the Counter Radio-Controlled Electronic Warfare (CREW) jammers on its vehicles to deal with such threats.
 
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tellis1

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There are 7 Irish defence forces personal out there, none are involved in actively diffussing IEDs on the ground.

How is that setting the international standard as the article claims ?
There are two involved in the Counter IED cell, so I suppose you are right they would know nothing about what goes on in their own field despite being deployed there and not out "diffussing' every day . :roll:
 

Aspherical123

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There are two involved in the Counter IED cell, so I suppose you are right they would know nothing about what goes on in their own field despite being deployed there and not out "diffussing' every day . :roll:
NATO runs military ops in Afghanistan.

Your claiming the Irish army is actively involved in the Afghanistan conflict ? Thats Bs.

I dont dispute they are there with the UN as observers and even go out with counter IED teams.
 

Cael

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I'd imagine to stop trawlers in our waters fishing illegally, stop the RA scum from bombing us and in times of catastrophe but thats just my opinion. Besides didnt USSR have a wonderful army ?
The IRA is the Irish Army.
 

Cael

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To put manners on your dissident colleagues should the need arise is a sufficient reason, I believe.
Last time they tried that, they ended up a few recruits short, if I remember. What was it, two thousand free state troops against three PIRA Volunteers - and PIRA won.
 

FrankSpeaks

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Well done to the EOD personnel they thoroughly deserve their award. They are amongst the most well equipped and knowledgeable in the world in doing this work. I am very proud of them and the work they do.
 

Aspherical123

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Well done to the EOD personnel they thoroughly deserve their award. They are amongst the most well equipped and knowledgeable in the world in doing this work. I am very proud of them and the work they do.

What do you base that claim on ?

I dont dispute they are a brave and professional outfit, but when claims like "setting the international standard" and " among the most well equipped in the world" are made you enter the realms of Bs. Reminds me of the claim made the week that Ireland had got a "bullet Train" albeit one that does at 60mph, the media and defence forces spokesmen who brief them are full of Bs.

The EOD Unit of the Irish army has none of the gear below.

Discovering IEDs, however, is not enough; they must then be neutralised. Robots can move them and place explosives to blow them up. But many robots are too big and heavy to be carried by soldiers on foot. QinetiQ, a British firm which makes the widely used Talon robot (pictured above), has a new lightweight back-packable version called Dragon Runner. It costs more than $150,000.

Hand held sniffers.

The right signal

After garage-door triggers, bombers switched to using mobile-phone components to trigger detonators—and from a greater distance. Next, because mobile-phone signals can be randomly delayed or jammed, they turned to long-range cordless phones which do not pass through a telecoms network. Some jamming equipment can scramble these signals, as well as those from mobile phones, but the best kit devours battery power and costs more than €100,000 ($140,000). Also, jamming sometimes wrecks a security force’s own communications, a predicament known as “electronic fratricide”.

By analysing the wavelengths of the reflected light it can identify specific chemicals. The company plans to fit these sniffers on airborne drones, too.




BAE Systems, a British defence firm, is devising an alternative. It uses a vehicle-mounted camera, object-recognition software and satellite positioning to create detailed 3-D maps of roads, pinpointing features such as pot-holes. When vehicles subsequently pass along the same road the system can spot any new features, such as a rubbish heap or anything else that might hide a bomb. James Baker of BAE, who is working on the project, says defeating IEDs is now the operational priority for Britain’s defence ministry.

http://www.economist.com/node/15582147
 


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