Depression on the rise - is this the real measure of austerity?

Disillusioned democrat

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I'm surprised this isn't making a bigger splash - on p.ie or actually anywhere in the media other than RTE.

Revealed: Massive rise in antidepressant prescribing

Basically 20% of the population are on anti-depressants - that's about twice the rate in the UK.

Our country is going down the tubes - health, justice and housing are all in a complete mess - the primary interfaces citizens have with their society.

FG have led failed policies over all 3 social pillars to their supporters benefit, but the real cost - human misery - is beginning to be measured in diazepam doses.
 
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fifilawe

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there are thousands of us who cannot see a "bright future and fulfilling life and have lost hope " so what can "the professionals in the Health Service do to help".There are no psychologists/psychiatrists available at an affordable price for low waged or unemployed persons to "adjust one's thinking about life". In all the years I'm on medication I've never had an appointment with a "head shrink" but in the hospital I was asked once in 9 years "had I seen/spoken to anyone".I have never sought out to see a "mind expert" they are just there for severe mental illness not mild anxiety,depression, social phobias etc.
 

silverharp

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I doubt it has much to do about how a country is run, Zimbabweans are probably happier than Norwegians.
 

Paddyc

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I remember reading that depression can increase where the economy is on the rise.

People cope with their feelings during an economic downturn as they are trying to survive. It's when that 'survival phase' is over and they still feel miserable that depression can really hit.
 

ednw1

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I remember reading that depression can increase where the economy is on the rise.

People cope with their feelings during an economic downturn as they are trying to survive. It's when that 'survival phase' is over and they still feel miserable that depression can really hit.
in that case we should be ok soon, with the number of business folding round me it feels very 2006
 

Disillusioned democrat

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I doubt it has much to do about how a country is run, Zimbabweans are probably happier than Norwegians.
You missed the point that it's on the rise - prescriptions are 28% up on 2012 - that's massive in national terms.

100s of 1000s of people - nearly 20% of the population now - are being medicated to deal with depression.

It's parallel is the housing crisis - the REAL solution is to solve the problem, but the government seem happier to throw tax payers money at private business instead.
 

silverharp

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You missed the point that it's on the rise - prescriptions are 28% up on 2012 - that's massive in national terms.

100s of 1000s of people - nearly 20% of the population now - are being medicated to deal with depression.

It's parallel is the housing crisis - the REAL solution is to solve the problem, but the government seem happier to throw tax payers money at private business instead.
I didn't miss anything, the point still stands , I don't believe it has any bearing on how the country is being run, which is your point. Im sure the rise is multifaceted , anything from it being a disease of modernity itself , diet, obsession with pharmaceutical "cures" and so on
 

Orbit v2

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Some top medics are saying anti depressants are being over prescribed, particularly by GPs, for conditions that they won't help with at all and which require much more deep rooted interventions like counselling and life changes.
 

APettigrew92

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Basically 20% of the population are on anti-depressants - that's about twice the rate in the UK.

Our country is going down the tubes - health, justice and housing are all in a complete mess - the primary interfaces citizens have with their society.

FG have led failed policies over all 3 social pillars to their supporters benefit, but the real cost - human misery - is beginning to be measured in diazepam doses.
I am not sure if FG can be blamed on this. The entire body politic of Ireland would have to be reexamined to get a firm grip on the issue.

Speculation would be a combination of a hyper-consumerist society where job quality, security and prospects for the future are potentially worse than they've ever been.

Within my own immediate environment, I've personally experienced things which I interpret to be issues for the immediate future.
The higher institutions of education are littered with non-chalant types who prize their own academic achievements over that of their students. The banking and housing sectors seem to be shackled to one another with both pursuing only one rather limited goal : highest return and highest debt possible from a given investment. Considering people bailed these banks out only to now have to get mugged for even a basic loan is reprehensible. 'Free market' be damned, it is a cartel under another name.

The 'young adults' of today - people that fall into the 20 -30 bracket - arre for the large part possessed by PC-inspired dogma. While I am happy to vote for extending rights for minorities, which frankly we never should've had to vote on, it is a deplorable state of affairs when you see individuals on the other side of the spectrum villified and blacklisted for sharing what they consider to be their personal truth.

We talk too much and listen too little, we're all convinced that our parents are underachieving bumpkins who have nothing to offer us yet we will happily doff the cap to a political system which has proven itself time and time again to be unreliable, corruptible and incompetent.

There is a lot of arrogance in the youth of today which has no basis in reality. We're just not fully aware of how the game was played before we arrived to the poker table.
 

Jack O Neill

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I am not sure if FG can be blamed on this. The entire body politic of Ireland would have to be reexamined to get a firm grip on the issue.

Speculation would be a combination of a hyper-consumerist society where job quality, security and prospects for the future are potentially worse than they've ever been.

Within my own immediate environment, I've personally experienced things which I interpret to be issues for the immediate future.
The higher institutions of education are littered with non-chalant types who prize their own academic achievements over that of their students. The banking and housing sectors seem to be shackled to one another with both pursuing only one rather limited goal : highest return and highest debt possible from a given investment. Considering people bailed these banks out only to now have to get mugged for even a basic loan is reprehensible. 'Free market' be damned, it is a cartel under another name.

The 'young adults' of today - people that fall into the 20 -30 bracket - arre for the large part possessed by PC-inspired dogma. While I am happy to vote for extending rights for minorities, which frankly we never should've had to vote on, it is a deplorable state of affairs when you see individuals on the other side of the spectrum villified and blacklisted for sharing what they consider to be their personal truth.

We talk too much and listen too little, we're all convinced that our parents are underachieving bumpkins who have nothing to offer us yet we will happily doff the cap to a political system which has proven itself time and time again to be unreliable, corruptible and incompetent.

There is a lot of arrogance in the youth of today which has no basis in reality. We're just not fully aware of how the game was played before we arrived to the poker table.
Perhaps if people binned their phones and tablets and started actually having conversations with each other there would be less need for pills
 

MsDaisyC

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Perhaps if people binned their phones and tablets and started actually having conversations with each other there would be less need for pills
Perhaps the rise in people on antidepressants is people realising there's something treatable wrong with them and getting the help they need to live, rather than succumbing to suicide.
 

farnaby

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I'm one of them, on and off for years, sadly realising that a thankfully low dose of lexapro keeps me from succumbing to despair, a feeling I'd compare to being on a plane that is slowly but unstoppably losing altitude. Wish i'd realised it earlier in life, youth would have been so much more enjoyable.

I like APettigrew92's reference to hyper-consumerism - the notion that it's good to desire stuff and gratify yourself and terrible that you can't afford everything you want, it's a guaranteed way to make people depressed. Every major religion/spirituality movement describes the path to contentment and right living as a decoupling from desire because human wants are infinite and feeding them only makes them worse.

There's a lot to blame in the political system - particularly one like ours that deliberately undertaxes a rich sector to artificially make GDP look great - but that's a lot bigger than FG/FF and the rest.
 

Jack O Neill

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Perhaps the rise in people on antidepressants is people realising there's something treatable wrong with them and getting the help they need to live, rather than succumbing to suicide.
have the suicide rates fallen dramatically ?
 

HenryHorace

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I'm surprised this isn't making a bigger splash - on p.ie or actually anywhere in the media other than RTE.

Revealed: Massive rise in antidepressant prescribing

Basically 20% of the population are on anti-depressants - that's about twice the rate in the UK.

Our country is going down the tubes - health, justice and housing are all in a complete mess - the primary interfaces citizens have with their society.

FG have led failed policies over all 3 social pillars to their supporters benefit, but the real cost - human misery - is beginning to be measured in diazepam doses.

FFG and their pals in business don't want people they want human robots. Destroy the public health service and drive them into the arms of the private health cartel that's owned by their buddies and keep them working with happy pills.
 

HenryHorace

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Some top medics are saying anti depressants are being over prescribed, particularly by GPs, for conditions that they won't help with at all and which require much more deep rooted interventions like counselling and life changes.
In other news water is wet.
 

Gorton28

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Breakdown of strong community bonds combined with increased atomisation of society is my guess. Progressive Ireland isn't such a lovely, happy clappy place after all.
 

Disillusioned democrat

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Breakdown of strong community bonds combined with increased atomisation of society is my guess. Progressive Ireland isn't such a lovely, happy clappy place after all.
Maybe people wanted decent healthcare, a home for their family and justice more than they want same sex marriage and abortion - who would have thought????
 

APettigrew92

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have the suicide rates fallen dramatically ?
They've been underreported for years. Cultural stigma, desire for the family to keep the death private. Deaths by misadventure, drink-driving etc etc.
Perhaps if people binned their phones and tablets and started actually having conversations with each other there would be less need for pills
How does one simply jump into that conversation? This island has endured more hardship, misfortune and toil than most. The mass graves outside Skibbereen stand silent testament to the catastrophes suffered.

The Irish have a disproportionate tolerance for hardship. But to do as you suggest - launch into a conversation about how you feel, or even attempt to properly convey such emotions - is considered taboo by many older generations. I simply think that this is not a realistic thing at present.

Go ask how many people actively engage even with their own parents and, failing that, with their friends. In my experience, the truth is a fleeting thing indeed in the Irish household.

Perhaps the rise in people on antidepressants is people realising there's something treatable wrong with them and getting the help they need to live, rather than succumbing to suicide.
You're not wrong. I think personally that this catastrophe has its home in secondary schools.

Outside of the Private Schools, there seems to be no attempt to listen to students. There are no comprehensive programs in place to actively diagnose students who may be either emotionally precocious or emotionally stunted. Social media serves as a tool to remind teenagers that there are loads of seemingly happy people and as a previous poster mentioned, atomisation is a thing.

We're not educated to talk. It's all well and good to say so, but having a good converstion is not a given thing. Self expression is at a minimum in schools as it is. It's a societal issue and has been for years. Communication at the heart of Irish society is bafflingly absent.
 


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