Depression on the rise - is this the real measure of austerity?

Jack O Neill

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Maybe people wanted decent healthcare, a home for their family and justice more than they want same sex marriage and abortion - who would have thought????
or maybe they want/ wanted all of the above . I doubt if the latter are driving many to depression, except maybe geriatric religious loons
 


Antóin Mac Comháin

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How does one simply jump into that conversation?


Self-Harm support groups modeled on AA have sprung up in some countries, and the pioneers of that movement predicted in the 1940s or the 1950s that it would be thus, and that it would evolve and change to accommodate people and groups in parallel situations and circumstances. A view which was echoed by William Duncan Silkworth in the Doctors Opinion in the Introduction of what is known in the AA community as the Big Book who said: "These men may well have a remedy for thousands of such situations."



This island has endured more hardship, misfortune and toil than most. The mass graves outside Skibbereen stand silent testament to the catastrophes suffered.


Fast forward the above prediction to inner-city communities in north America in the 1970s and the 1980s, and community activists like David Hillaird began to recognize the limitations of abstinence and self-help groups and programs for alcoholics and drug addicts from socio-economically disadvantaged communities. Hillaird was orginaly a Black Panther activist and was involved in the Breakfast Program for Schoolkids, once described as the greatest internal threat to American National Security by the head of the CIA. He wrote a book called This Side of Glory which was a biograpgy charting his journey from there through addiction and his life afterwards.



I am not sure if FG can be blamed on this. The entire body politic of Ireland would have to be reexamined to get a firm grip on the issue.



Speculation would be a combination of a hyper-consumerist society where job quality, security and prospects for the future are potentially worse than they've ever been.



Within my own immediate environment, I've personally experienced things which I interpret to be issues for the immediate future.



The higher institutions of education are littered with non-chalant types who prize their own academic achievements over that of their students. The banking and housing sectors seem to be shackled to one another with both pursuing only one rather limited goal : highest return and highest debt possible from a given investment..


Yea, blaming the government isn't a solution in and of itself, in the same way a British Withdrawal from Ireland isn't a solution in and of itself to the problems created by colonialism and the British occupation of Ireland, which is one of the 7 primary causes of suicide in Ireland. However, a government with the will to fix the housing crisis and to end British rule in Ireland is an absolute necessity in either instance. That clearly isn't the case with FG and housing, but that problem is compounded by the fact that the opposition more often than not, live in a parallel universe to their subject-matter, and Anti-Homeless Action Groups and Pro-Housing Campaigns divorced from the grassroots and the people is like a fist without fingers and is ultimately doomed to failure and will eventually unravel. OK, there may be a lot genuine and wel-intentioned people among the many different groups, but take Home Sweet Home for example, which was a cross-party initiative led by Sinn Féin, the SP, the SWP and a number of other groups: The motive, the means, the method and the objective, all contradict each other. Hence why it failed to produce something similar to the Foundations Project, despite all the money the people involved accumulated: The Foundations Project was a program designed to take people from homelessness and into education and employment. Not one shoe fits all, and a homeless person with addiction issues is faced with a different set of circunstances to a person on the housing waiting list, a family with mortgage arrears, an immigrant living in Direct Provision or a Traveler living in sub-standard second class housing, although they all fall under the same umbrella of housing. In other words, Point A, and the motivational factor are the same, but the means and the methods of Point B to bring them to Point C are different. Politicians of all hues are always interested in Point C, and getting credit for the outcome of A and B: The motivational force, Point A, which inspired the Bradshaw report, Point B, in the 1980s came from a problem in socio-economically disadvantaged working class communities, who were excluded from Point C. In other words, the net result of the research carried out by the working class ultimately benefited the middle class. There are clear parallels between that process and the Housing Rights Campaigns, and indeed the net outcome of all the research into suicide, and the communities which have borne the brunt of the problem have no input into how or where any of the funding is spent. There's been 3 deaths in my community in the past week which I'm aware of, so with regard to the question posed about a decline in the rates of suicide, I think it's business as usual. A friend of mine told me at a funeral not so long ago, that it was the 12th such he'd been at that year, and he has spent a lifetime at the coal front of community activism. The gig is up when people like that get demoralized and become disillusioned. Sorry to finish on a negative note, but it is what it is.
 

APettigrew92

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In other words, the net result of the research carried out by the working class ultimately benefited the middle class. There are clear parallels between that process and the Housing Rights Campaigns, and indeed the net outcome of all the research into suicide, and the communities which have borne the brunt of the problem have no input into how or where any of the funding is spent. There's been 3 deaths in my community in the past week which I'm aware of, so with regard to the question posed about a decline in the rates of suicide, I think it's business as usual. A friend of mine told me at a funeral not so long ago, that it was the 12th such he'd been at that year, and he has spent a lifetime at the coal front of community activism. The gig is up when people like that get demoralized and become disillusioned. Sorry to finish on a negative note, but it is what it is.
Thank you for the post - it's always good to read some well-thought, sincere interpretations of things like this. As you say, there is no one answer for any of these things but I would strongly support your view on housing as a key indicator of personal well-being.

The simple fact is that housing is a disaster. An unmitigated disaster. Profiting from someone's desire to strike out by themselves and exercise their independence is nothing short of reprehensible. They recently built a new complex of "student" apartments in Grangegorman. The average rent for one of the 9m2 box rooms is €1,600 a month. Any typical "Irish" "student" who can attend classes, study on the side and hold down a part-time job with the intention of paying for their accommodation and living costs would never touch more than €800-a-month.

There is no desire for this to change; middle-class Irishmen and women come from families where money such as that has never been an issue or has had it stowed away for such times. University fees increased, sure, but when they were increased the first thing the Government did away with were the grants for lower class students. Rather than insulating the most vulnerable, they took a scythe to them. Zero-hour contracts introduced. Special assistants for the most troubled students? Slashed. Ministerial pensions? Intact. Jobsbridge introduced. Masters grants for lower-income families removed. Entirely. A masters can reach €10,000 a year in some places. The dole for 18-24 year olds was slashed. Specifically for that age group. Why?

So you exclude lower-income families from higher education and housing while simultaneously pushing them into jobs where the minimum wage is insufficient to enter into education or secure housing in any foreseeable future. Then the FG types come out and declare victory over the recession? George W's speech on Iraq in 2003 was loaded with just as much hubris as that one.

If you were born between 1990 and 1999, you've known nothing but people telling you how great the Tiger years were and how we're all paying for it now. One quarter of that generation have emigrated having seen the writing on the wall. Civil servants start on a fraction of the wage of people who may have only entered the profession a couple of years before them. Dublin city is now flooded with "students" who've overstayed their Visas or in many cases never even came in on a valid one and who put enormous pressure on low-income jobs and housing. UCD has the gall to call its alumni looking for direct-debit transfers for underprivileged students while it turns over tens of millions a year.

The banking crisis ripped the heart out of the country for the next few decades and yet not a single individual responsible was ever even held accountable. Everywhere, individuals who knowingly gambled with the futures of millions walk around and continue living as if nothing ever changed. We had a political revolution though, yes. We traded one establishment party for the other and called it revolution. Our Taoiseach is an unelected puppet who wasn't even elected by his own card-carrying members but by the vested elites in FG. A pretty face to cover up scandal after scandal after scandal while surrounding himself with hapless chumps who've about as much experience as they do brain cells.

Ireland of 2019 is a country where the Social Democrats run a failed asylum seeker as an apparent representative of the people, where Labour are stewing in their miserable betrayal of the working class, where a business tycoon sues a newspaper for reporting the truth about his dodgy finances and where the most pressing issues for the educated middle class is pushing through abortion legislation and demanding more solidarity with immigrants despite the majority never having ever worked with or met one aside from their poolside vacations abroad.

When I was in UCD in 2012, I remember an exchange I had with a debater from Trinity College. I was explaining the disparity between access to higher level institutions from underprivileged backgrounds, how Government policy over funding was lopsided and disproportionately unfavourable to lower-income families etc. He stood up and, after a brief pause, said that "I think we're misconstruing the facts here; why do we say working class when we all know that most of the working class don't even work?"

Not a single person in that room of twelve supposed future luminaries of the Irish State took issue with that. That's not a niche opinion. It cannot be.

The upper echelons of Irish political society and the decision-making types are all still infected with the Trevelyan interpretation of Malthusian economics. If you're poor, it's because you're lazy. If you can't access education, you're stupid. If you can't find a job, you're not looking hard enough. If you can't afford rent, it's your own fault. This is a common retort - you even hear it in schools. Why do we think that the upper classes send their kids to private schools? Public schools are solely there to convinced you that you're trash. Once you're sure that you're trash, then, well, you can justify the suffering caused by structurally incompetent policies as something that's wrong with you.

The British may have left in body but the spirit of the Tories lives on strongly in the hearts and minds of those born into good fortune. That's why the Private School elite will never address the victims of incompetent economics as equals.

In their hearts and minds, that simply isn't even true. They've been taught since birth not to see you as an equal. How do the youth of today come to terms with such a world?
 

wombat

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I'm not sure that access to higher education is all its cracked up to be. The people who complain most tend to be academics with arts or social science backgrounds. Those who are involved in science or engineering are used to working with people who have served apprenticeships in hard trades and appreciate the opportunities that this path opens.
 

Antóin Mac Comháin

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The simple fact is that housing is a disaster. An unmitigated disaster. Profiting from someone's desire to strike out by themselves and exercise their independence is nothing short of reprehensible. They recently built a new complex of "student" apartments in Grangegorman. The average rent for one of the 9m2 box rooms is €1,600 a month. Any typical "Irish" "student" who can attend classes, study on the side and hold down a part-time job with the intention of paying for their accommodation and living costs would never touch more than €800-a-month.

There is no desire for this to change; middle-class Irishmen and women come from families where money such as that has never been an issue or has had it stowed away for such times. University fees increased, sure, but when they were increased the first thing the Government did away with were the grants for lower class students. Rather than insulating the most vulnerable, they took a scythe to them. Zero-hour contracts introduced. Special assistants for the most troubled students? Slashed. Ministerial pensions? Intact. Jobsbridge introduced. Masters grants for lower-income families removed. Entirely. A masters can reach €10,000 a year in some places. The dole for 18-24 year olds was slashed. Specifically for that age group. Why?
That reminds me of what Pearse said about the English Education System in Ireland: "The English were too wise a people to educate the Irish in any real sense of the word." Well, the Upper Classes are too wise a people to Educate the working classes.

You can only play with the hand you were dealt, and if the elected representatives of the working class had the will and the imagination, the obstacles you're referring to with regard to Education, could have been circumvented. The cost of building digs for students could have been overcome by developing Ghost Estates and building universities in them. I'm not too familiar with the Grangegorman area, but I think there was a lot of old flats complexes that were earmarked for demolition which could have been re-developed.

When I was in UCD in 2012, I remember an exchange I had with a debater from Trinity College. I was explaining the disparity between access to higher level institutions from underprivileged backgrounds, how Government policy over funding was lopsided and disproportionately unfavourable to lower-income families etc. He stood up and, after a brief pause, said that "I think we're misconstruing the facts here; why do we say working class when we all know that most of the working class don't even work?"

Not a single person in that room of twelve supposed future luminaries of the Irish State took issue with that. That's not a niche opinion. It cannot be.
What's the most dangerous thing in America? An unemployed man with a library card.

The upper echelons of Irish political society and the decision-making types are all still infected with the Trevelyan interpretation of Malthusian economics. If you're poor, it's because you're lazy. If you can't access education, you're stupid. If you can't find a job, you're not looking hard enough. If you can't afford rent, it's your own fault. This is a common retort - you even hear it in schools. Why do we think that the upper classes send their kids to private schools? Public schools are solely there to convinced you that you're trash. Once you're sure that you're trash, then, well, you can justify the suffering caused by structurally incompetent policies as something that's wrong with you.

The British may have left in body but the spirit of the Tories lives on strongly in the hearts and minds of those born into good fortune. That's why the Private School elite will never address the victims of incompetent economics as equals.

In their hearts and minds, that simply isn't even true. They've been taught since birth not to see you as an equal. How do the youth of today come to terms with such a world?
It's not necessarily the case that someone from a working class background would have a positive experience attending somewhere like Trinity College. Having those views re-enforced on a daily basis in a toxic environment is bound to have a negative impact on a persons development, which I think defeats the purpose. The level of the 'structural incompetence' you refer to, can be measured by the amount of Trinity Access Programs, set aside for people from disadvantaged communities. If it's not designed to keep us out, it most certainly isn't designed to get us in.
 

APettigrew92

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That reminds me of what Pearse said about the English Education System in Ireland: "The English were too wise a people to educate the Irish in any real sense of the word." Well, the Upper Classes are too wise a people to Educate the working classes.

You can only play with the hand you were dealt, and if the elected representatives of the working class had the will and the imagination, the obstacles you're referring to with regard to Education, could have been circumvented. The cost of building digs for students could have been overcome by developing Ghost Estates and building universities in them. I'm not too familiar with the Grangegorman area, but I think there was a lot of old flats complexes that were earmarked for demolition which could have been re-developed.
There were families from my home area who voted Labour for thirty years. They expected meaningful change in 2009 when the country fell down around our ears. What happened with that fun experiment? 2-4% approval rating in a decade. Unprecedented in fall.

There were rows of former social houses that were leveled. Then you had the Occupy Grangegorman lads occupy the skeleton site that remained before the Gardai persuaded them to move on. Now you have the luxury student apartment nonsense gone in. Similar braindead policy in Dublin 1. Student accommodation built around the corner from Mountjoy Square at €2,200 for a room. These aren't meant for the average individual's income.

It's not necessarily the case that someone from a working class background would have a positive experience attending somewhere like Trinity College. Having those views re-enforced on a daily basis in a toxic environment is bound to have a negative impact on a persons development, which I think defeats the purpose. The level of the 'structural incompetence' you refer to, can be measured by the amount of Trinity Access Programs, set aside for people from disadvantaged communities. If it's not designed to keep us out, it most certainly isn't designed to get us in.
Similar to a previous poster's assertion, I would respond that access itself is the key indicator of social equality within a modern society. In Germany and France, any individual can expect to attend University given a reasonable investment on their side scholastically speaking.

In Ireland, a middle-class student from Singapore whose parents earn sufficiently enough to send him abroad can be expected a guaranteed place on a course whereas a working-class student cannot.

Perceived level of access to services is the issue. Not everyone in France or Germany attends University but they know it is an option. To deny individuals access to education based on irreconcilable factors - being born into a low-income family - has no place in a modern democracy.

The commercialization of education, housing and other public services is often the key component of the birth and growth of populism. It didn't work in the UK, it's not working in the USA and why anyone without skin in the game would consider it to be a good bet is either a fool, shortsighted or plain malevolent.
 

Orbit v2

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That reminds me of what Pearse said about the English Education System in Ireland: "The English were too wise a people to educate the Irish in any real sense of the word." Well, the Upper Classes are too wise a people to Educate the working classes.
Rubbish. The biggest barrier to working class kids is people with attitudes like yours.

There is no upper class in Ireland. 'Middle class' and 'working class' are labels people apply to themselves and I question the motivation of people who do - usually either snobbery or reverse snobbery.
 

Antóin Mac Comháin

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When I was in UCD in 2012, I remember an exchange I had with a debater from Trinity College. I was explaining the disparity between access to higher level institutions from underprivileged backgrounds, how Government policy over funding was lopsided and disproportionately unfavourable to lower-income families etc. He stood up and, after a brief pause, said that "I think we're misconstruing the facts here; why do we say working class when we all know that most of the working class don't even work?"

Not a single person in that room of twelve supposed future luminaries of the Irish State took issue with that. That's not a niche opinion. It cannot be.
Rubbish. The biggest barrier to working class kids is people with attitudes like yours.

There is no upper class in Ireland. 'Middle class' and 'working class' are labels people apply to themselves and I question the motivation of people who do - usually either snobbery or reverse snobbery.
OK, but I was responding to a post in which 'a debater from Trinity College' made the above claim. What do you think his motives were? I think an 'inverted snob' is the term you were looking for. Depression and mental health issues can effect people from any class, so I don't think it's fair to dismiss anyone. However, if the problem is more concentrated in some areas than it is in others, as is the case with suicide, it's wrong to dismiss the socio-economic factors and the class nature of the problem. I'm not sure how it makes someone an 'inverted snob' for claiming that suicide is more prevalent in Ballymun than it is in Killiney.

Student accommodation built around the corner from Mountjoy Square at €2,200 for a room.
I don't have accommodation issues, but presuming APettigrew92 was a student at that point in time and couldn't afford to pay €2,200 for a room, or other students couldn't afford it, I'm not sure how telling people to 'think positive' is going to make a blind bit of difference. If one can afford it and another can't, and they both have similar ability, well then there clearly is a wealth gap between one class and the other.

Perceived level of access to services is the issue. Not everyone in France or Germany attends University but they know it is an option. To deny individuals access to education based on irreconcilable factors - being born into a low-income family - has no place in a modern democracy.
I'm not sure what the figures are, but I signed up for an access course as a mature student, although I had to drop out for personal reasons so I can't offer an opinion on the overall process. A few years prior to that, when I was homeless and at a loose end I enrolled in an Introduction to Law course which I thought was good insofar as it got me back into the swing of things, but I found the price of books and further studying was well beyond my means, so I didn't pursue a career in it. and I'm not sure I would have done so either way.
 

Orbit v2

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Whatever about third level, state funding of primary and second level is skewed towards the under privileged. And it's how you get on at second level that determines entry to third level. Education is what you make of it folks. Also, nobody has to pay €2,200 a month for student accommodation. You can get decent house sharing situations for a lot less than half that on bus routes in Dublin.
 

Emily Davison

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You missed the point that it's on the rise - prescriptions are 28% up on 2012 - that's massive in national terms.

100s of 1000s of people - nearly 20% of the population now - are being medicated to deal with depression.

It's parallel is the housing crisis - the REAL solution is to solve the problem, but the government seem happier to throw tax payers money at private business instead.
The issue is not that depression is on the rise. Instead the issue is over prescription and addiction. That along with a pill for every ill.
 

Disillusioned democrat

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The issue is not that depression is on the rise. Instead the issue is over prescription and addiction. That along with a pill for every ill.
The correlation with this and the last governments abysmal management of the state's social services and the rise in inequality it too defined to be a coincidence.

Research suggests that continuing difficulties – long-term unemployment, living in an abusive or uncaring relationship, long-term isolation or loneliness, prolonged work stress – are more likely to cause depression than recent life stresses. However, recent events (such as losing your job) or a combination of events can ‘trigger' depression if you’re already at risk because of previous bad experiences or personal factors.
Over nearly a decade now this and the previous government have ground the state down - scandal after scandal involving tax payers money being wasted or given away, increased taxes on lower pay, long commutes and 75% of disposable income needed to fund accommodation, massive inequality as some seen to ride high during the worst of times and all the while the government patting itself on the back for its liberal agenda.
 

Round tower

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In the last 10 to 12 years i knew 5 fellas who comitted suicide, of the 4 only 1 ever complained of depression, a number of years earlier he fallen off a ladder while paintig and hurted his head. He went everywhere getting help, he had tried unsuccessfully a number of times, his wife done her best never to leave him alone in the house, for ssome reaason he was left alone, when she came back the shed door waas closed and she knew straigght away.
The other 3 men, never, the first fella, he was driving a van with a work coleague with him, pulled up beside the Moy and by the other fella realised what he was going to do it was to late.their was something on his mind as his sister was busy that day at work and when she got to check her phone she had 18 missed calls from him but it was to late at that stage.
The 2nd fell, married no kids, fine new house, fine farm of land, always in good humour, one morning he rang an neighbour who he had talked to in months, that he had a cow who was having trouble calvingand he might come up and give him a hand. Would have take 10 to 15 minutes to get from his house to the shed and along the way he heard a shot. Not paying much heed to the shot he entered the stable and found him lying on the ground, he thought he had got a kick from a cow, but he had shot himself.
The 3rd, seperated with 2 kids, had a job, had not heard of him being depressed.
The 4th fella yesterday, alaways seemed to be in good humour., the last person who u would ever think of doing it, worked for a farmer, played a couple gaames of cards with only a couple of weeks ago. Lived at home with his parents, went out to the shed yesterday morning and hung himself, it has being said that he spent all day Sat. in bed, so their must have being something troubling him.

RIP Alan, John, Keneth, JP and Johnny
 

APettigrew92

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Rubbish. The biggest barrier to working class kids is people with attitudes like yours.

There is no upper class in Ireland. 'Middle class' and 'working class' are labels people apply to themselves and I question the motivation of people who do - usually either snobbery or reverse snobbery.
The biggest barrier to working class kids is their attitude? Jesus.

Wait until I go around Hardwicke Street and Sheriff Street and tell them that acceptance to Private Schools is conditional on their attitude and, you know, not their lack of €6,000 a year.

Why aren't we rolling this out across the country? Just change your attitude! Think positively! Just do it!

Oh, right. Because it's a reductive, cheap gas-station-style motivational soundbite that crumbles at first contact with the structural inequalities in a system which disproportionately favours those born into comfortable financial backgrounds. Attitude is a big factor, no doubt. There is a certain dosage of reality required all the same.

Whatever about third level, state funding of primary and second level is skewed towards the under privileged. And it's how you get on at second level that determines entry to third level. Education is what you make of it folks. Also, nobody has to pay €2,200 a month for student accommodation. You can get decent house sharing situations for a lot less than half that on bus routes in Dublin.
Oh right. So we should stop funding public education? You realize the State throws quite a bit of cash to Private Schools and Universities despite these institutions being famously under-representative of the State's population?

Oh, I wasn't saying that some chap with a rifle was holding you at gunpoint until your parents paid a ransom of €2,200. I was giving it as an example of how the focus for these new student apartments is obviously on individuals who come from wealthy families.

Does Kells count as being on the bus route to Dublin? If so, how many people can I expect to share with? Hypothetically speaking.

Maybe the landlord will take less money from me if I just change my attitude.
 

Hillmanhunter1

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The whole of the 3 years that I spent studying psychology would have been a complete and utter waste if it had not been for this wonderful book:
The_Myth_of_Mental_Illness_(1961_Hoeber-Harper_edition).jpg
It should be required reading for every healthcare professional.
 

Orbit v2

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The biggest barrier to working class kids is their attitude? Jesus.

Wait until I go around Hardwicke Street and Sheriff Street and tell them that acceptance to Private Schools is conditional on their attitude and, you know, not their lack of €6,000 a year.

Why aren't we rolling this out across the country? Just change your attitude! Think positively! Just do it!

Oh, right. Because it's a reductive, cheap gas-station-style motivational soundbite that crumbles at first contact with the structural inequalities in a system which disproportionately favours those born into comfortable financial backgrounds. Attitude is a big factor, no doubt. There is a certain dosage of reality required all the same.



Oh right. So we should stop funding public education? You realize the State throws quite a bit of cash to Private Schools and Universities despite these institutions being famously under-representative of the State's population?

Oh, I wasn't saying that some chap with a rifle was holding you at gunpoint until your parents paid a ransom of €2,200. I was giving it as an example of how the focus for these new student apartments is obviously on individuals who come from wealthy families.

Does Kells count as being on the bus route to Dublin? If so, how many people can I expect to share with? Hypothetically speaking.

Maybe the landlord will take less money from me if I just change my attitude.
Rubbish post. Read what I wrote and reply to that, not what you seem to think I wrote.
 
D

Deleted member 34656

Most people I know qualify as depressed since around 1997.

Unfortunately I also qualified as a doctor under the same regime.

So depression is normal.

Going on pre 1997 thinking I would classify 90% as suffering from depression now.

Miraculously, I’m in the 10%

:grin:
 

michael-mcivor

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Depression is all in the mind of those that need others to talk to them- to explain life to them-

If you don’t mind if you don’t let others put their opinions down your throat you will be grand-

Beware those looking money of you to explain life to you-
 
D

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X
They've been underreported for years. Cultural stigma, desire for the family to keep the death private. Deaths by misadventure, drink-driving etc etc.

How does one simply jump into that conversation? This island has endured more hardship, misfortune and toil than most. The mass graves outside Skibbereen stand silent testament to the catastrophes suffered.

The Irish have a disproportionate tolerance for hardship. But to do as you suggest - launch into a conversation about how you feel, or even attempt to properly convey such emotions - is considered taboo by many older generations. I simply think that this is not a realistic thing at present.

Go ask how many people actively engage even with their own parents and, failing that, with their friends. In my experience, the truth is a fleeting thing indeed in the Irish household.



You're not wrong. I think personally that this catastrophe has its home in secondary schools.

Outside of the Private Schools, there seems to be no attempt to listen to students. There are no comprehensive programs in place to actively diagnose students who may be either emotionally precocious or emotionally stunted. Social media serves as a tool to remind teenagers that there are loads of seemingly happy people and as a previous poster mentioned, atomisation is a thing.

We're not educated to talk. It's all well and good to say so, but having a good converstion is not a given thing. Self expression is at a minimum in schools as it is. It's a societal issue and has been for years. Communication at the heart of Irish society is bafflingly absent.
Everyone is a snitch now. There is no trust. So people don’t talk because they know they are talking to more than the person in front of them.
 
D

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Like, when you hear Clare Daly on the radio talking about concert ticket prices, you know there is no hope.
 


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