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Dermot Ahern and White Collar Crime


Malbekh

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Apr 30, 2009
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It occurs to me that we are heading to the inevitable conclusion that very few, if any, of the bankers and developers - let alone our politicians - will pay a suitable price for destroying a perfectly good economy.

By paying a price of course, I mean in terms of jail sentences, financial ruin or exclusion from politics or a permanent ban on directorships of companies.

The main reason for this is our limited and pathetic laws on white collar crime. One would have thought in the interests of the State, that the current Justice Minister would have spent a good deal of his time drafting new legislation dealing with this inadequacy.

I've scoured around and all I seem to pick up on is new blasphemy laws and various draconian measures to deal with gangland crime. Am I missing something here? Is this a classic case of plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose?
 

dalywise

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Feb 23, 2008
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811
Another reason they'll all walk, especially politicians, is the outdated laws on treason. Given the number of FF politicians that have destroyed the country by pursuing policies to benefit and enrich a mere handful of people, the treason laws should be changed to cover patronage and economic manipulation to benefit a chosen few.
 

SideysGhost

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The last time the Irish economy was anywhere near "perfectly good" was around 1997-8...it's been a sham ever since.
 

He3

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Oct 1, 2008
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Take your pick, you have all the time in the world

In general -
http://www.politics.ie/justice/45664-crippling-whitecollar-crimebusters-how-fianna-fail-did.html

In particular -
http://www.politics.ie/justice/136260-company-law-odce-time-reform.html


Incredible -
The ODCE's Kevin Prendergast said that there was an expectations gap between what people expected of the ODCE and what it could actually do.
http://www.politics.ie/justice/133085-corporate-enforcement-office-says-we-expect-too-much.html

Innocent -
http://www.politics.ie/economy/46979-innocent-fraud-galbraith-how-we-arrived-here.html
 

He3

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He3

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White collar grime?

He likes his white collars. Never a sign of grime either. Does that count? Could this all be a matter of mixing up a g for a c?
 
Last edited:

Broke

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Joined
Oct 1, 2010
Messages
480
It occurs to me that we are heading to the inevitable conclusion that very few, if any, of the bankers and developers - let alone our politicians - will pay a suitable price for destroying a perfectly good economy.

By paying a price of course, I mean in terms of jail sentences, financial ruin or exclusion from politics or a permanent ban on directorships of companies.

The main reason for this is our limited and pathetic laws on white collar crime. One would have thought in the interests of the State, that the current Justice Minister would have spent a good deal of his time drafting new legislation dealing with this inadequacy.

I've scoured around and all I seem to pick up on is new blasphemy laws and various draconian measures to deal with gangland crime. Am I missing something here? Is this a classic case of plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose?
Of course they will all get away with it,nobody will go to jail because the establishment never get prosecuted for anything.
 

Malbekh

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Apr 30, 2009
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3,032
In light of current developments with Mr Drumm, seems only fair to point out the obvious correlation. I have a feeling I will be returning to this thread on a regular basis over the next year or so...
 

SlabMurphy

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Joined
Mar 14, 2009
Messages
1,701
Website
www.dublin.ie
It occurs to me that we are heading to the inevitable conclusion that very few, if any, of the bankers and developers - let alone our politicians - will pay a suitable price for destroying a perfectly good economy.

By paying a price of course, I mean in terms of jail sentences, financial ruin or exclusion from politics or a permanent ban on directorships of companies.

The main reason for this is our limited and pathetic laws on white collar crime. One would have thought in the interests of the State, that the current Justice Minister would have spent a good deal of his time drafting new legislation dealing with this inadequacy.

I've scoured around and all I seem to pick up on is new blasphemy laws and various draconian measures to deal with gangland crime. Am I missing something here? Is this a classic case of plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose?
Good thread, have been thinking about this myself. Contrast how John Gilligan and co. were - rightly - protrayed in the media and tougher crime laws and punishment as well as CAB etc Two years after the country has gone into the most horrendous spiral due to cronyism, corruption and incompetence - and the great FF haven't brought in a single change to see that it doesn't happen again. Says it all about the future of this rotten, pathetic state. And FG wouldn't do anything either.

And even if Labour or whoever got proper laws passed, FF would be in again sometime and like stealth taxes, chip away at the tough corporate laws until they became worthless like they did with the Ethics in Public and Freedom of Information acts. That's why I say we need some sort of constitutional reform to copper fasten governance and corporate regulation and punishment so that in future FF or FG for that matter don't allow the flood gates to open for corruption, cronyism and incompetence.
 

Watcher2

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Joined
May 2, 2010
Messages
33,975
It occurs to me that we are heading to the inevitable conclusion that very few, if any, of the bankers and developers - let alone our politicians - will pay a suitable price for destroying a perfectly good economy.

By paying a price of course, I mean in terms of jail sentences, financial ruin or exclusion from politics or a permanent ban on directorships of companies.

The main reason for this is our limited and pathetic laws on white collar crime. One would have thought in the interests of the State, that the current Justice Minister would have spent a good deal of his time drafting new legislation dealing with this inadequacy.

I've scoured around and all I seem to pick up on is new blasphemy laws and various draconian measures to deal with gangland crime. Am I missing something here? Is this a classic case of plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose?

Has it only occured to you now Malbekh? On top of everything, this is the rotten cherry on top the cake, a mouldy, spotty cake.
 

He3

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Oct 1, 2008
Messages
17,094
They do things differently in Latvia

An Irish banker chairing one of Latvia’s troubled banks is leading a multimillion-euro legal action there against two of the bank’s former senior executives.

Michael Bourke was asked to become chairman of Parex Bank earlier this year by the Latvian government, following the collapse of the bank in 2008. Parex is seen as the Balkan state’s equivalent to Anglo Irish Bank, as it had to be bailed out by the government and the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD)

Bourke started his career in the Irish Central Bank and has been involved in banking in Latvia for many years.

After his becoming chairman of Parex, the board of the bank began a legal action against its two former majority owners who also served as chief executive and chairman - Valery Kargin and Victor Krasovisky.

Latvian executives
 

Nipper

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Joined
May 19, 2009
Messages
2,550
An Irish banker chairing one of Latvia’s troubled banks is leading a multimillion-euro legal action there against two of the bank’s former senior executives.

Michael Bourke was asked to become chairman of Parex Bank earlier this year by the Latvian government, following the collapse of the bank in 2008. Parex is seen as the Balkan state’s equivalent to Anglo Irish Bank, as it had to be bailed out by the government and the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD)

Bourke started his career in the Irish Central Bank and has been involved in banking in Latvia for many years.

After his becoming chairman of Parex, the board of the bank began a legal action against its two former majority owners who also served as chief executive and chairman - Valery Kargin and Victor Krasovisky.
Latvian executives
He3 any connection to this crowd?

Profits in Desmond's Latvian bank plummet by 66pc - European, Business - Independent.ie

Irish Banker, Russians and English Football clubs, now where else would you get it?
 

MsAnneThrope

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Joined
Apr 8, 2009
Messages
1,818
Dominic Coyle had a good article in last week's Irish Times: Justice must be seen to apply to white collar criminals

Since 1990, the Oireachtas has passed 21 separate criminal justice Acts – compared with just nine between the foundation of the State and 1990. Everything from terrorism to shoplifting has been legislated for in that time. As we battled with our financial crisis this year, a Criminal Justice Bill turned its attention to the issue of begging.
Keep up the good work Dermot...
 

He3

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Joined
Oct 1, 2008
Messages
17,094
Has it only occured to you now Malbekh? On top of everything, this is the rotten cherry on top the cake, a mouldy, spotty cake.
A cake that continues to take its toll.

'He said the investigation was progressing against the backdrop of cutbacks in the public service and a freeze on garda recruitment.

“Repeated exhortations were being made to do more with less. That was the context within which this has to be understood,” he said.

However, Mr Condon told the jury that at a meeting with officials at the Department of Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation in March 2011, also attended by the Garda Commissioner, ODCE representatives said they were satisfied with the resources they had.
He said Mr O’Connell attended this meeting and did not raise any concern about resources.

Mr O’Connell said he was “a subordinate officer” to then Director of Corporate Enforcement Paul Appleby, and one of his colleagues had given the meeting the views of the director.

“I didn’t see it that I was entitled to go in and go off on a solo run about resources,” he said.

The trial continues.'

ODCE investigator admits mistakes in probe into Sean FitzPatrick loans - Independent.ie
 
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