Deterioration of Irish Waters continues apace, what to do?

GDPR

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EPA figures from 2013-2015 show that 55% of river water bodies, 46% of lakes, 32% of transitional waters and 76% of coastal waters achieving good or high status. For our protected areas, 93% of bathing waters met the required standards in 2015. For shellfish waters the most recent information, for 2015, shows 75% of sites meeting the microbiological guide value. For Special Areas of Conservation or SACs with water dependency, around 60% of river water bodies and almost 70% of lakes achieved their required status. However, the situation for Special Areas of Conservation or SACs in transitional waters was less positive – with 37% of such areas meeting their required standards of good status. The problem is that instead of making progress, the opposite is happening with a general decline from approx. 2009.

For the 1,360 river and lake water bodies at risk of not meeting their objectives the significant pressures impacting on them include agriculture (64%), urban waste water (22%), hydromorphology (19%), forestry (16%), domestic waste water (12%), peat extractive industry (10%) and urban run-off (10%). For the at risk river and lake water bodies, 47% of them are subject to a single significant pressures, with the remaining 53% subject to more than one significant pressure.

Investment in urban wastewater facilities have seen significant improvements since 2000, but there is much work that needs to be done still. Changes in forestry practices regarding felling, drainage, proximity to water bodies and planting of native species will take time to work through and indeed further improvement can be achieved so that the planting, management and felling of forestry does not negatively impact on waters. The same applies for peat, with 2030 a target to cease peat cutting and work ongoing to restore peatlands which again takes time to work through. Urban run off or diffuse sources include mis-connections of housing estates etc. to the sewer network through leakages, cracks and discharge to surface water system, which means that much work is required to ensure housing estates etc are properly connected up to sewer systems. Poorly maintained septic tanks can be rectified but a greater challenge is those septic tanks in very poorly draining soils, with effluent having nowhere to go as the ground simply will not absorb it and hence treat it, instead it just runs off to the nearest water course. Hydro-morphology is a complicated one and you can look at this source for further information - Hydromorphology - REFORM wiki

Other sources of pollution, called point sources, are from industry, quarries, pesticides etc that are generally individual events and can be dealt with.

The elephant in the room so to speak is agriculture. More specifically this means nitrate, phosphate and sediment run off to waters, through a combination of poorly managed farm yards and fields, and indeed on very poorly draining soils similar to septic tanks above, a solution is not easy to find although I'm open to suggestions on for example marl soil areas with both tillage and animal farms causing difficulties. This is further complicated with the Foodwise 2025 Strategy specifically looking to boost agriculture production so managing the two together will be very challenging.

The above information is taken from the draft river basin management plan 2017-2021, which is open to public consultation until August 31st, with the final plan due towards the end of the year, and I would encourage people to submit their views and indeed possible solutions.

Bottom line, all of the above activities are polluting our waters, impacting on drinking water and bathing waters, impacting on fish and protected species in our water bodies, and will fall foul of the EU's water framework directive and possible ECJ actions and fines. Thoughts:confused:

http://www.housing.gov.ie/sites/default/files/public-consultation/files/draft_river_basin_management_plan_1.pdf
Public Consultation on the draft River Basin Management Plans for Ireland 2018-2021 | Department of Housing, Planning, Community and Local Government
 


Lúidín

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Never mind that elephant in the room or all that pollution nonsense. The question is how much have the aparatchiks of the trousering parties managed to pocket from the sale of resources, seats on boards and 'driving their businesses forward'?
 

Northsideman

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Introduce a charge to cover improvements:D
 

TheWolf

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EPA figures from 2013-2015 show that 55% of river water bodies, 46% of lakes, 32% of transitional waters and 76% of coastal waters achieving good or high status. For our protected areas, 93% of bathing waters met the required standards in 2015. For shellfish waters the most recent information, for 2015, shows 75% of sites meeting the microbiological guide value. For Special Areas of Conservation or SACs with water dependency, around 60% of river water bodies and almost 70% of lakes achieved their required status. However, the situation for Special Areas of Conservation or SACs in transitional waters was less positive – with 37% of such areas meeting their required standards of good status. The problem is that instead of making progress, the opposite is happening with a general decline from approx. 2009.

For the 1,360 river and lake water bodies at risk of not meeting their objectives the significant pressures impacting on them include agriculture (64%), urban waste water (22%), hydromorphology (19%), forestry (16%), domestic waste water (12%), peat extractive industry (10%) and urban run-off (10%). For the at risk river and lake water bodies, 47% of them are subject to a single significant pressures, with the remaining 53% subject to more than one significant pressure.

Investment in urban wastewater facilities have seen significant improvements since 2000, but there is much work that needs to be done still. Changes in forestry practices regarding felling, drainage, proximity to water bodies and planting of native species will take time to work through and indeed further improvement can be achieved so that the planting, management and felling of forestry does not negatively impact on waters. The same applies for peat, with 2030 a target to cease peat cutting and work ongoing to restore peatlands which again takes time to work through. Urban run off or diffuse sources include mis-connections of housing estates etc. to the sewer network through leakages, cracks and discharge to surface water system, which means that much work is required to ensure housing estates etc are properly connected up to sewer systems. Poorly maintained septic tanks can be rectified but a greater challenge is those septic tanks in very poorly draining soils, with effluent having nowhere to go as the ground simply will not absorb it and hence treat it, instead it just runs off to the nearest water course. Hydro-morphology is a complicated one and you can look at this source for further information - Hydromorphology - REFORM wiki

Other sources of pollution, called point sources, are from industry, quarries, pesticides etc that are generally individual events and can be dealt with.

The elephant in the room so to speak is agriculture. More specifically this means nitrate, phosphate and sediment run off to waters, through a combination of poorly managed farm yards and fields, and indeed on very poorly draining soils similar to septic tanks above, a solution is not easy to find although I'm open to suggestions on for example marl soil areas with both tillage and animal farms causing difficulties. This is further complicated with the Foodwise 2025 Strategy specifically looking to boost agriculture production so managing the two together will be very challenging.

The above information is taken from the draft river basin management plan 2017-2021, which is open to public consultation until August 31st, with the final plan due towards the end of the year, and I would encourage people to submit their views and indeed possible solutions.

Bottom line, all of the above activities are polluting our waters, impacting on drinking water and bathing waters, impacting on fish and protected species in our water bodies, and will fall foul of the EU's water framework directive and possible ECJ actions and fines. Thoughts:confused:

http://www.housing.gov.ie/sites/default/files/public-consultation/files/draft_river_basin_management_plan_1.pdf
Public Consultation on the draft River Basin Management Plans for Ireland 2018-2021 | Department of Housing, Planning, Community and Local Government
The couple of billion wasted on the water quango might have sorted some of the above problems.
Then again, The Maltese tax exile wouldn't have been bailed out....
 

Marcos the black

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Well, you get what you pay for.... Literally.
 

Marcos the black

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My taxes did.
But you're right, didn't pay the bills and didn't claim the bribe.
Thank f**k!
I don't have one cos I have my own water supply and septic tank that I pay for directly. My taxes also paid for yours. This seems fair to you. Good for you. As I said you get what you pay for. There's never been a boil notice on my water :p
 

Lúidín

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Have any of the loyal servants of the trousering party got their money back yet?
I'd ask but I don't know anyone who fell for the scam.
 

TheWolf

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I don't have one cos I have my own water supply and septic tank that I pay for directly. My taxes also paid for yours. This seems fair to you. Good for you. As I said you get what you pay for. There's never been a boil notice on my water :p
Have my own Biocycle unit, at great expense I might add with an annual €350 service charge.
Will Leo be sending me a cheque?
You know, all this parity of esteem and stuff they're going on about.

BTW, are septic tanks (as opposed to treatment plants like I mentioned above) in line with building regulations?
Do they comply with the EU directives?
 

TheWolf

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Have any of the loyal servants of the trousering party got their money back yet?
I'd ask but I don't know anyone who fell for the scam.
You can be guaranteed they took the €100 bribe too.
 

Marcos the black

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Have my own Biocycle unit, at great expense I might add with an annual €350 service charge.
Will Leo be sending me a cheque?
You know, all this parity of esteem and stuff they're going on about.
Fancy that. The provision of water is expensive. Who'd have tunk it?
 

GDPR

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Lads, this is not a water charges thread, there are umpteen of those. I'm simply pointing out a significant problem of water pollution that is likely to increase in political priority as the EU will absolutely take action over one of their directives being ignored on the ground.
 

Marcos the black

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Lads, this is not a water charges thread, there are umpteen of those. I'm simply pointing out a significant problem of water pollution that is likely to increase in political priority as the EU will absolutely take action over one of their directives being ignored on the ground.
Cause and effect. Quite simple really. Which is why we'll be fined for it.
 

TheWolf

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Lads, this is not a water charges thread, there are umpteen of those. I'm simply pointing out a significant problem of water pollution that is likely to increase in political priority as the EU will absolutely take action over one of their directives being ignored on the ground.
Does Marcos's septic tank comply with the EU directives on waste treatment?
 

GDPR

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Jul 5, 2008
Messages
217,846
Have my own Biocycle unit, at great expense I might add with an annual €350 service charge.
Will Leo be sending me a cheque?
You know, all this parity of esteem and stuff they're going on about.

BTW, are septic tanks (as opposed to treatment plants like I mentioned above) in line with building regulations?
Do they comply with the EU directives?
whether a septic tank or a more advanced system, it's the same issue, of not installed properly and/or maintained properly, especially the advanced ones, this can cause pollution to ground water, and for this thread where near a stream, lake etc. pollution to already polluted waters.
 

TheWolf

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Cause and effect. Quite simple really. Which is why we'll be fined for it.
How much and when can we expect these fines?
Has FG submitted our river basin management plan yet?
It's 3 years late at this stage.
Are they still clinging on in an attempt to claim that water charges are the established practice here?????
 


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