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Do Ireland's Banks and Pension Funds believe in Global Warming and Sea Level Rise?

Hans Von Horn

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Sep 4, 2015
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1,594
The mantra of Ireland's trendy left is that we in Ireland must change our way of life to prevent climate change. The reality is that the future of Climate Change will be decided outside Ireland. Sea level change is nothing new as the seas have risen 100 metres in the last 8000 years.

We should of course presume the worst possible outcome in terms of locating future Buildings. If Buildings are to have a life of hundreds of years, say 250 years, for a modern Concrete Framed Structure then we need to consider if it is likely to be swallowed by sea level rise in it's lifetime.

The Willingness of Banks to fund lending for new Buildings, on future flood plains needs to be questioned, and they must be directed not to lend on property, that is likely to become flooded by coastal drowning over the coming decades.

Similarly our Pension Funds cannot expect a good return on Assets that are likely to be drowned by coastal drowning.

There are other local factors in sea level change such as coastal up warping and down warping which can add or subtract circa 3 mm per year or 300mm per hundred years.
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The annual rate of rise of sea level over the past 20 years has been 0.13 inches (3.2 millimeters), roughly twice the average speed of the preceding 80 years and we simply do not know how this will change in future. If the Global warming theory is to be believed we must expect the rate of sea level rise to increase

A Worst case of 1.8 metres rise in 100 years are envisaged.
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Larger Storm events would be likely to create surges well above 1.8 metres.

Should we really be building in areas that will be meters below sea level in 200 years? It's time to move up the hill.

Rising sea levels of 1.8 meters in worst-case scenario
:: Climate Change In Asia ::
(1) Expect half a meter rise by 2100.

(2) Be prepared for a meter rise by 2100.

(3) Don't be too surprised if there's a two meter rise by 2100.

(4) And finally, know that if business as usual emissions continue, then the seas won't stop rising for a long time; sea level will keep rising by rates of more than one meter per century if CO2 levels reach and stay above something in the neighborhood of 600 ppm.

Can the Oisin Coghlans and Eamon Ryans of this World really stop the Sea from Rising? Next they will want to control the weather!
 


Jim Car

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May 19, 2014
Messages
2,675
I don't know and to be honest whether they do or don't is not my first concern when i think of them. My main concern is that they are handling my money well and getting the return they said they would. Though they haven't exactly been filling my with joy in regard to that.
 

ergo2

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Joined
Oct 4, 2008
Messages
14,034
The mantra of Ireland's trendy left is that we in Ireland must change our way of life to prevent climate change. The reality is that the future of Climate Change will be decided outside Ireland. Sea level change is nothing new as the seas have risen 100 metres in the last 8000 years.

We should of course presume the worst possible outcome in terms of locating future Buildings. If Buildings are to have a life of hundreds of years, say 250 years, for a modern Concrete Framed Structure then we need to consider if it is likely to be swallowed by sea level rise in it's lifetime.

The Willingness of Banks to fund lending for new Buildings, on future flood plains needs to be questioned, and they must be directed not to lend on property, that is likely to become flooded by coastal drowning over the coming decades.

Similarly our Pension Funds cannot expect a good return on Assets that are likely to be drowned by coastal drowning.

There are other local factors in sea level change such as coastal up warping and down warping which can add or subtract circa 3 mm per year or 300mm per hundred years.
<
>

The annual rate of rise of sea level over the past 20 years has been 0.13 inches (3.2 millimeters), roughly twice the average speed of the preceding 80 years and we simply do not know how this will change in future. If the Global warming theory is to be believed we must expect the rate of sea level rise to increase

A Worst case of 1.8 metres rise in 100 years are envisaged.
<
>

Larger Storm events would be likely to create surges well above 1.8 metres.

Should we really be building in areas that will be meters below sea level in 200 years? It's time to move up the hill.

Rising sea levels of 1.8 meters in worst-case scenario
:: Climate Change In Asia ::
(1) Expect half a meter rise by 2100.

(2) Be prepared for a meter rise by 2100.

(3) Don't be too surprised if there's a two meter rise by 2100.

(4) And finally, know that if business as usual emissions continue, then the seas won't stop rising for a long time; sea level will keep rising by rates of more than one meter per century if CO2 levels reach and stay above something in the neighborhood of 600 ppm.

Can the Oisin Coghlans and Eamon Ryans of this World really stop the Sea from Rising? Next they will want to control the weather!

Is there any proof that 8000 years ago sea levels in Ireland were a 100 metres lower than now?
 

ibis

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Mar 12, 2005
Messages
12,293
Is there any proof that 8000 years ago sea levels in Ireland were a 100 metres lower than now?
Not as such, because they weren't quite that low at that time. They were very much lower during the most recent ice age, not too long before that, and I presume that's what's meant.

As for proof of ancient sea levels, yes, obviously the sea level does leave evidence. We have beaches above and below the current water line, for example, river-cut valleys under the sea and hanging valleys above.
 
Last edited:

farnaby

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May 15, 2006
Messages
1,930
OP suggests Irish financial institutions think long term. 2002 onwards suggests not.
 

Hans Von Horn

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Sep 4, 2015
Messages
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Is there any proof that 8000 years ago sea levels in Ireland were a 100 metres lower than now?
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Sinking land
In the Ice Age, land weighed down under 1500m of ice sank by over 100m. Land round the edges (like north France and southern England) rose in compensation - like a see-saw.

When the ice melted, the fairly rigid land mass took time to return to its original levels - so much so, that Kent and Nord-PasdeCalais are still slowly sinking back at rate of a few cm every 100 years. This causes long-run worries for sea-flooding. Much of the low-lying coast on either side is protected by seawalls, which can be breached if there's a storm at high tide. Where the land behind is former marshland, it may be 0,5m below mean sealevel.


http://www.theotherside.co.uk/tm-heritage/background/channelform.htm

http://www.skepticalscience.com/Past-150000-Years-of-Sea-Level-History-Suggests-High-Rates-of-Future-Sea-Level-Rise.html
 
Last edited:

Hans Von Horn

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Sep 4, 2015
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Some very expensive property in Dublin will Flood.
 

Radix

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Aug 31, 2010
Messages
9,892
Some very expensive property in Dublin will Flood.


And the sooner the better. Think of the new boom in money lending, banking, planning, building, etc....

All from higher ground of course.


:)
 


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