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Do the majority of the electorate now favour a more liberal abortion regime?


statsman

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Looking at the result of today's RedC poll result, I'm inclined to see signs of a sea-change in the public mood.

Majority support X case legislation - poll - RTÉ News

8% want no legalisation.
26% want a referendum to remove suicide from the X Case ruling.
29% want abortion on demand.
35% full X Case legislation.

We're entering new territory here. There is little appetite for the favoured anti-abortion strategy of calling for another referendum, and perhaps most surprisingly, only 8% are totally opposed to abortion in all circumstances. Is this the beginning of a new approach to this thorny question? I, for one, believe it is.
 

borntorum

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Hold your horses. 33% of the population opposed the the 1983 amendment, so there has always been a sizeable minority who are opposed to the pro-life campaign.
 

ger12

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Today were find ourselves in a situation where a government is legislating for abortion, which may or may not lead to abortion on demand, in circumstances where it is not clear what the electorate wish to see regarding the threat of suicide. And the opinion of the people has not been sought in this regard (this of real concern in a country where the people are sovereign surely?).

The views of the people may have indeed changed over the years since the 8th amendment was accepted by the people.

If the people were to choose to remove the 8th amendment then our legislators would be mandated to legislate as they believe society wishes? If the people were to choose to amend the 8th amendment to remove the risk of suicide then legislators would ensure that the medical profession were protected in decisions made to ensure the woman's life was protected?

Ireland inserted the 8th amendment to do something that has now ended up as being contrary to the will of the people at that time.
 

statsman

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Hold your horses. 33% of the population opposed the the 1983 amendment, so there has always been a sizeable minority who are opposed to the pro-life campaign.
Yes, but 8% only are opposed to any and all abortions.
 

statsman

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Today were find ourselves in a situation where a government is legislating for abortion, which may or may not lead to abortion on demand, in circumstances where it is not clear what the electorate wish to see regarding the threat of suicide. And the opinion of the people has not been sought in this regard (this of real concern in a country where the people are sovereign.

The peoples views may have indeed changed over the years since the 8th amendment was accepted by the people.

If the people were to choose to remove the 8th amendment then our legislators would be mandated to legislate as they believe society wishes? If the people were to choose to amend the 8th amendment to remove the risk of suicide then legislators would ensure that the medical profession were protected in decisions made to ensure the woman's life was protected?

Ireland inserted the 8th amendment to do something that has now ended up as being contrary to the will of the people at that time.
My question concerns the will of the people at this time, which is the only factor that counts now.
 

FrankSpeaks

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I think most people would prefer to remove the stupid prohibition from our constitution where it should never have been put in the first place. After that has been done let our legislators do what they are elected to do!
 

drummed

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Today were find ourselves in a situation where a government is legislating for abortion, which may or may not lead to abortion on demand, in circumstances where it is not clear what the electorate wish to see regarding the threat of suicide. And the opinion of the people has not been sought in this regard (this of real concern in a country where the people are sovereign.

The peoples views may have indeed changed over the years since the 8th amendment was accepted by the people.

If the people were to choose to remove the 8th amendment then our legislators would be mandated to legislate as they believe society wishes? If the people were to choose to amend the 8th amendment to remove the risk of suicide then legislators would ensure that the medical profession were protected in decisions made to ensure the woman's life was protected?

Ireland inserted the 8th amendment to do something that has now ended up as being contrary to the will of the people at that time.
Time has moved on. Try to keep up. A large number of those who voted that way are now dead. Sad but true. A whole generation never voted as you suggest. If i was a so called "pro-life" campaigner i would avoid a public vote at all costs now.
 

ger12

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Sister Mercedes

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I support the right of a woman to choose an abortion in the first trimester of pregnancy, the first 9-10 weeks.

I don't applaud the choice, but I support the right to make it.
 

ger12

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Time has moved on. Try to keep up. A large number of those who voted that way are now dead. Sad but true. A whole generation never voted as you suggest. If i was a so called "pro-life" campaigner i would avoid a public vote at all costs now.
Exactly. Society has changed. And should have a say in how we approach the issue of abortion in the future.
 

borntorum

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Yes, but 8% only are opposed to any and all abortions.
Presumably those people actually want mothers to die in childbirth.

Another way of looking at the poll results is that 69% of those polled want to continue with the current constitutional provision or something even more anti-abortion. The pro-choice side shouldn't be getting overly excited (personally I reluctantly support abortion on demand up until approx 10-12 weeks)
 

ger12

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Based on these figures you may not like the answer i suspect.
You are presuming my views on abortion lie in one camp. I have stated before that I support neither camp. I guess it's a reflection of how divisive this issue is that I feel I have to state this.

Politicians have to address the ruling by the ECHR to give clarity to the current situation. There are a number of options that could be taken including reflecting on the appropriateness of the 1983 amendment to Ireland in 2013 and through referendum, consider altering, replacing or removing the 8th amendment. At present they are choosing to legislate for the X case.
 

ger12

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statsman

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So then, lets legislate on the results of Red C polls :roll:
I'm not sure which is sillier, your insistence that you are neutral on the abortion issue or your dismissal of polls that don't meet your requirements. Let's call it a draw.
 

sondagefaux

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So ask them.
I would love there to be a referendum on liberalisation of Ireland's abortion laws.

I don't think the forced birthers would like one though.

I'd also be happy to have a third referendum on the suicide ground from the X-case judgment.

I'm absolutely confident that a proposal to remove suicide as a ground for getting a legal abortion would be rejected again.
 

The Field Marshal

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There is no doubt but the baby murdering brigade are out in full force these days.
 

statsman

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I would love there to be a referendum on liberalisation of Ireland's abortion laws.

I don't think the forced birthers would like one though.

I'd also be happy to have a third referendum on the suicide ground from the X-case judgment.

I'm absolutely confident that a proposal to remove suicide as a ground for getting a legal abortion would be rejected again.
Yes, I'm coming around to the notion of a comprehensive referendum myself.
 
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