Do you fold your plastic bags for reuse to stop global plasticisation? There is a simple way to fold them.

Patslatt1

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Do you fold your plastic bags for reuse to stop global plasticisation? There is a simple way to fold them.

A group of young friends were amused watching me fold a Supervalu plastic bag for reuse and place it in my overcoat pocket. The bag measures 17.5" x 17.25" (44 x 43.5). They would not be amused by the threat of global plasticisation, with forecasts that on current trends in about 30 years there will be more plastic than fish in the oceans.

A YouTube demonstration of how to neatly fold a plastic bag very tightly takes too many steps to be practical, in my opinion. A simple folding I use includes: 1. Fold the bag in half from bottom to top 2.Fold the bag in from the sides so that the folded parts are roughly equal 3.Fold in half again from bottom to top, twice 4.Use the handle of the bag to secure the folds.

I use a folded plastic bag for several months in about three shopping trips a week until they eventually develop a tear. A friend recommended I use a cloth bag but a free one I got in a shoe purchase from Schuh shop is far bulkier folded than my Supervalu bag. I must investigate other makes of cloth bags.
 


*EPIC SUCCESS*

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I have a super valu cloth bag that I use for small amounts (bread, milk, eggs and a few other pieces) that I got quite a few years ago. I am very strict about always leaving it in the glove box of the car and both me and the wife leave at least two larger ones in the car boot as well. I try to avoid plastics where possible and I hate that they are still giving out those really thing and flimsy ones as well.

I should also point out as well that Tesco are really taking the pee with their 79c 'bag for life' bags. Total untruth and part of the reason I avoid plastic bags of any gauge. Super valu do a decent and strong cloth one for around 1/2 euro as well.
 

statsman

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I have a super valu cloth bag that I use for small amounts (bread, milk, eggs and a few other pieces) that I got quite a few years ago. I am very strict about always leaving it in the glove box of the car and both me and the wife leave at least two larger ones in the car boot as well. I try to avoid plastics where possible and I hate that they are still giving out those really thing and flimsy ones as well.

I should also point out as well that Tesco are really taking the pee with their 79c 'bag for life' bags. Total untruth and part of the reason I avoid plastic bags of any gauge. Super valu do a decent and strong cloth one for around 1/2 euro as well.
Canvas bags are a must, really.
 

Trainwreck

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Canvas bags are a must, really.

I love the "everyone knows" meme:

Life Cycle Assessment of grocery carrier bags

The report provides a lifecycle assessment (LCA) of production, use and disposal of shopping bags available in Danish supermarkets in autumn 2017.

According to this Danish EPA study, you must use that canvas bag 7,000 times to have as little environmental impact as using one single plastic bag and throw it in the bin for landfill. If you reuse the plastic bag, perhaps as a bin bag, that differential becomes even greater.

Conventional cotton bags: Reuse for grocery shopping at least 52 times for climate change, at least 7100 times considering all indicators; reuse as waste bin bag if possible, otherwise incinerate.
If you are a full blown greenie numpty and insist on "organic" canvas bags, that number goes up to 20,000:

Organic cotton bags: Reuse for grocery shopping at least 149 times for climate change, at least 20000 times considering all indicators; reuse as waste bin bag if possible, otherwise incinerate.


But hey, it's all about the "feels" right?
 

Trainwreck

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Best legislation in recent years.

yours

owner of two canvas bags.
Are you happy now knowing that hard science estimates you are doing much more harm to the environment than using light "disposable" plastic carrier bags?

Or are you anti-science and prefer the ole' "but this feels right" approach to decision making.
 

Levellers

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Are you happy now knowing that hard science estimates you are doing much more harm to the environment than using light "disposable" plastic carrier bags?

Or are you anti-science and prefer the ole' "but this feels right" approach to decision making.
As I drive around the country I don't see trees and hedges decorated with ripped plastic bags. Feels right to me.
 

Trainwreck

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As I drive around the country I don't see trees and hedges decorated with ripped plastic bags. Feels right to me.
You are saying that if you use plastic bags you would throw them into hedges and trees? And by using canvas bags you don't do that?You aren't making sense.


At a society wide level, that problem was solved by putting a 5 cent price on them, which did not end their use, merely reduced their wanton waste.



I love this. This is the demonstrative proof that the overwhelming majority of "environmentally conscious" people are merely emoting, or virtue signalling. When confronted by hard data that shows they are making perverse environmental decisions, they still stick to their "feelings".
 

Patslatt1

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I love the "everyone knows" meme:

Life Cycle Assessment of grocery carrier bags




According to this Danish EPA study, you must use that canvas bag 7,000 times to have as little environmental impact as using one single plastic bag and throw it in the bin for landfill. If you reuse the plastic bag, perhaps as a bin bag, that differential becomes even greater.



If you are a full blown greenie numpty and insist on "organic" canvas bags, that number goes up to 20,000:





But hey, it's all about the "feels" right?
PCness can be opinionated and ignore facts like these. Who knew, though, given this surprising counterintuitive data above?
 

statsman

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PCness can be opinionated and ignore facts like these. Who knew, though, given this surprising counterintuitive data above?
Everything has an environmental impact. You have to set the ubiquity of plastics in the ocean and their absolute destructive potential to the environment against the LCA of cotton bags. Marine life is not choking on cotton shopping bags.
 

Trainwreck

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PCness can be opinionated and ignore facts like these. Who knew, though, given this surprising counterintuitive data above?
People who never properly interrogate facts find such things to be "counter intuitive". There is no rationally informed intuition that leads anyone to suppose a reusable bag will necessarily have less environmental impact than a disposable plastic one.


The people so base that they rely on the most moronic heuristics; "plastic = bad", "organic = good". Stupid beyond belief. But annoying to normal people on whom they want to force these feelings-based laws, regulations and taxes.
 


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