Do you try to "Buy Irish"? Or buy from where you come from?

blokesbloke

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I popped to Waitrose today to get some choccies for a lovely colleague who'd done my a favour. I buy lots of things like this and lately I have been buying various Irish brands. So I bought my fourth box of Irish choccies, rejecting a "Swiss" brand which for some reason was made in France.

This is entirely down to P.ie - mad feckers the lot of ye and there's one or two on here who could easily have turned me off, but generally most of you seem very daycent skins and it's largely down to P.ie I am rather fond of Ireland now.

I have always been fairly patriotic and I have always tried to "Buy British" where I can. Not always easy, but I found the internet makes it easier - you can find directories of British-made products and it's surprising how many things are still made here if you look carefully.

Of course there's whole categories of items where it's virtually impossible to buy British - in fact most of them it's next to impossible to buy anything which isn't "Made in China" - but I've still been pleasantly surprised by how much I've managed to buy which was made here, especially since I got my own place. I've managed to buy British items as random as lampshades, textiles, washing-up bowls, curtains, even a cat flap!

Do Piesters try to "Buy Irish", or if you're from elsewhere do you try to buy from your home country?

If no Irish (or your own country) product is available, does it not matter where it comes from or would you still then try to buy from certain countries in order of preference?

If so, is this down to a perception that the product will be better quality if it's made in a certain country, or is it you know certain countries are more likely to have good working conditions, or is it simply you're fond of that country and want to support it? Or a combination of reasons or another reason I haven't thought of?

I try to buy British first, but I won't buy a British product if I think it's poor quality or over-priced. I'm prepared to pay more for any product made in First World countries because I understand it costs more to make there, and I might pay a slight premium for a British product over another one, but I wouldn't buy any crap just because it was British - that's counter-productive as no-one outside Britain will so the product will get crappier, as the British car industry could tell you.

If a British product isn't available, I'd certainly still check where it was made and that does affect my buying decision. My least favourite is China because I don't like how they treat their workers and I don't like their human rights record, and so many things are made in China I think it's important to resist them becoming the only country in the world that makes things.

I also find that whilst they do product some quality items, a lot of made-in-China is very badly made and even unsafe - when the Chinese baby-milk scandal broke I was determined not to buy anything Chinese-made if I was going to ingest it or apply it to my skin, because if they'll put melamine in their own baby milk they'd certainly do it for export products - and even big brands have found Chinese factories will disregard their specifications (Mattell had to recall toys when the Chinese factory substituted cheaper lead-based paint instead of the safer paint they were paid to use, and dogs died in America from eating famous-brand dog treats made in China).

So whilst I will buy some products made in China where there is no choice (often electrical goods) if there is an alternative I won't, and I am especially careful to reject products which are only more recently being made there, such a toiletries, cosmetics and greetings cards - there are still many alternatives here but many brands are sneaking in Chinese-made and surprisingly, often the "posher" brands such as Paperchase for cards/stationery and Bayliss and Harding for toiletries.

So China is my last choice, but otherwise I try to go for first world countries, simply because I can be reasonably sure the factories are going to be a basic decent standard for the workers. So basically anywhere in Europe (except Russia), USA, Canada, Japan, South Korea.

I favour Japanese made as I perceieve them to be generally the best for quality. To a lesser extent the same for South Korea and Germany, though I think German cars are over-rated.

I favour Irish stuff because I like you as a country and people, it's environmentally most sound as you're right next door, and certainly for foodstuffs I perceive your products to be very high quality, and that's partially influenced by talking to farmers on P.ie.

So, what say you? Do you buy Irish/wherever you come from?

Do you prefer to buy foreign goods?

Or don't you care?
 
Last edited:


Zapped(CAPITALISMROTS)

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daxxdrake
I propose that Failte Ireland are petitioned, to give blokes a position as Food Ambassador abroad as soon as..............:cool:
 

ger12

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I buy local, my neighbour sells eggs (2 euro half a doz, and they're delicious). I did most of my Christmas shopping in the nearest (very small, one street) town.

We're so damn lucky here with quality, I buy Irish butter, milk, veg in the local Supervalue. Fruit & other veg I'll look for European countries (thinking of pollution) and will avoid buying from countries further afield. Meat from either the local butcher or supermarket, it's always Irish. I avoid goods from Israel (politics) and USA (GM'd to death).
 

ne0ica

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I popped to Waitrose today to get some choccies for a lovely colleague who'd done my a favour. I buy lots of things like this and lately I have been buying various Irish brands.
I'd say your a great colleague to have.
 

Telstar 62

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I buy local, my neighbour sells eggs (2 euro half a doz, and they're delicious). I did most of my Christmas shopping in the nearest (very small, one street) town.

We're so damn lucky here with quality, I buy Irish butter, milk, veg in the local Supervalue. Fruit & other veg I'll look for European countries (thinking of pollution) and will avoid buying from countries further afield. Meat from either the local butcher or supermarket, it's always Irish. I avoid goods from Israel (politics) and USA (GM'd to death).
 

Spanner Island

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Price and quality trumps everything for me...

Of course if there are two products, one Irish, one imported and they're basically the same quality and a similar price... I'll go for the Irish option.

I won't pay through the nose for Irish products... and I'm increasingly spending more in Lidl while reducing my spend at places like M&S Food etc. which have hiked many of their prices since last June despite the plunge in sterling as a result of Brexit...

That kind of price gouging and taking the p!ss... well... it p!sses me off big time.
 

ger12

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Won't buy car fuel in Denis's places either.
 

Trainwreck

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I popped to Waitrose today to get some choccies for a lovely colleague who'd done my a favour. I buy lots of things like this and lately I have been buying various Irish brands.

This is entirely down to P.ie - mad feckers the lot of ye and there's one or two on here who could easily have turned me off, but generally most of you seem very daycent skins and it's largely down to P.ie I am rather fond of Ireland now.

I have always been fairly patriotic and I have always tried to "Buy British" where I can. Not always easy, but I found the internet makes it easier - you can find directories of British-made products and it's surprising how many things are still made here if you look carefully.

Of course there's whole categories of items where it's virtually impossible to buy British - in fact most of them it's next to impossible to buy anything which isn't "Made in China" - but I've still been pleasantly surprised by how much I've managed to buy which was made here, especially since I got my own place. I've managed to buy British items as random as lampshades, textiles, washing-up bowls, curtains, even a cat flap!

Do Piesters try to "Buy Irish", or if you're from elsewhere do you try to buy from your home country?

If no Irish (or your own country) product is available, does it not matter where it comes from or would you still then try to buy from certain countries in order of preference?

If so, is this down to a perception that the product will be better quality if it's made in a certain country, or is it you know certain countries are more likely to have good working conditions, or is it simply you're fond of that country and want to support it? Or a combination of reasons or another reason I haven't thought of?

I try to buy British first, but I won't buy a British product if I think it's poor quality or over-priced. I'm prepared to pay more for any product made in First World countries because I understand it costs more to make there, and I might pay a slight premium for a British product over another one, but I wouldn't buy any crap just because it was British - that's counter-productive as no-one outside Britain will so the product will get crappier, as the British car industry could tell you.

If a British product isn't available, I'd certainly still check where it was made and that does affect my buying decision. My least favourite is China because I don't like how they treat their workers and I don't like their human rights record, and so many things are made in China I think it's important to resist them becoming the only country in the world that makes things.

I also find that whilst they do product some quality items, a lot of made-in-China is very badly made and even unsafe - when the Chinese baby-milk scandal broke I was determined not to buy anything Chinese-made if I was going to ingest it or apply it to my skin, because if they'll put melamine in their own baby milk they'd certainly do it for export products - and even big brands have found Chinese factories will disregard their specifications.

So whilst I will buy some products made in China where there is no choice (often electrical goods) if there is an alternative I won't, and I am especially careful to reject products which are only more recently being made there, such a toiletries, cosmetics and greetings cards - there are still many alternatives here but many brands are sneaking in Chinese-made and surprisingly, often the "posher" brands such as Paperchase for cards/stationery and Bayliss and Harding for toiletries.

So China is my last choice, but otherwise I try to go for first world countries, simply because I can be reasonably sure the factories are going to be a basic decent standard for the workers. So basically anywhere in Europe (except Russia), USA, Canada, Japan, South Korea.

I favour Japanese made as I perceieve them to be generally the best for quality. To a lesser extent the same for South Korea and Germany, though I think German cars are over-rated.

I favour Irish stuff because I like you as a country and people, it's environmentally most sound as you're right next door, and certainly for foodstuffs I perceive your products to be very high quality, and that's partially influenced by talking to farmers on P.ie.

So, what say you? Do you buy Irish/wherever you come from?

Do you prefer to buy foreign goods?

Or don't you care?

Completely agnostic. I don't even look at place of origin.
 

cricket

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When it comes to food, always try to buy Irish , and local, first.
 

stakerwallace

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Where would I get Irish champagne and caviar?
 

ger12

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Nestlé tend to ruin many of their products.

They've destroyed KitKats for example... and many of their other chocolate products... all far too sickly sweet now...
Cadburys have gone the same way since it was bought by Kraft. More oil, fructose shíte.
 

ger12

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an modh coinniolach

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We're quite keen on flaunting our post-nationalist, economic sophistication over here. So nothing as gauche as buying Irish please.
 

im axeled

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yes i do whenever possible, electrical goods from flea bay and amazon, then again my needs are simple, so my shopping is small, i must admit that i enjoy the haggling at the few markets i can get to
 

Gaston

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In terms of food products, yes, absolutely, I always endeavour to buy Irish & local. It may cost a small premium but then our meat, veg, fish, dairy & speciality prepared produce is top tier and is worth the extra few quid IMO.

For the likes of clothing, footwear, DIY and a host of other household items and appliances, I buy more often than not on price. Mind you, with the exception of food produce, higher end clothes & footwear and chemicals I don't think we manufacture too much of anything of significance.

Cars are a typical example of something we have no choice but buy foreign. Again here though I buy on price typically. I have never understood conspicuous consumption badge snobbery when you can buy very good quality motors fully loaded with extras for a fraction of the price as your bog standard so called premium brands.
 
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cricket

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I stand proud and tall when buying viagra, knowing it's made in Cork.
 


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