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Doctors' insistence on unnecessary test delays girl's brain surgery.

davidcameron

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'How can you leave her like this?' - Mother's anguish as daughter (16) in need of brain surgery is turned away from Beaumont - Independent.ie

A mother has revealed the anguish her family suffered after her daughter (16), who is in need of brain surgery, was turned away from Beaumont Hospital.

The National Centre for Neurosurgery had no beds or theatre access for nine patients with malignant brain tumours last Friday.

One of the people who was turned away was 16-year-old Chloe Holian from Donegal.

Her mother Caitriona explained to the Anton Savage Show on TodayFM that the road to treatment has been fraught with setbacks.
If doctors hadn't insisted on carrying out an unnecessary test then the surgery would have been carried out at an earlier time - when there was a bed available.

"When we got down they told us that they decided to put off the surgery for a couple of days," said Caitriona.

She was told that the doctors wanted to perform a dexamethasone suppression test first to confirm that Chloe was, in fact, suffering from Cushing's - despite previous diagnosis revealing that she was.

However, she soon found out that the test couldn't be performed.

"At 11am someone in scrubs came around to say it wasn't fair but he had to tell us she won't be doing the surgery... and she wouldn't be getting the major test either," said Caitriona.

She said he was very empathetic of their situation.

"I felt sorry for him having to tell us that news... I asked him 'how can you leave her like this?'

"He promised that he was going to organise this test himself. It was quite difficult as you need four people in the surgery to do this test, you need the radiographer, neurosurgeon, endocrinologist and anesthetist."

Unfortunately, an anesthetist was not available for the test.
Why did the doctors insist on carrying out a test to see if she has Cushing's syndrome even though she has already been diagnosed?

I suspect that doctors' restrictive practices are to blame.
 


GabhaDubh

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Unnecessary test can be a way to buy time. The report states that there were no beds available. So subject the patient to anguish and drive up costs of health service.
 

davidcameron

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Unnecessary test can be a way to buy time. The report states that there were no beds available. So subject the patient to anguish and drive up costs of health service.
It doesn't say there was no bed available at the time when it was decided to carry out another test.
 

The Field Marshal

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If doctors hadn't insisted on carrying out an unnecessary test then the surgery would have been carried out at an earlier time - when there was a bed available.

Why did the doctors insist on carrying out a test to see if she has Cushing's syndrome even though she has already been diagnosed?

Doctors usually know best.
You need to prove these assertions of yours

I suspect that doctors' restrictive practices are to blame.
Please specify
 

Half Nelson

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If this happens, raise blue murder on the spot. They hate that in hospitals.

There's a time for politeness and smiling. When your surgery is cancelled isn't one of those times.
 

nakatomi

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'How can you leave her like this?' - Mother's anguish as daughter (16) in need of brain surgery is turned away from Beaumont - Independent.ie



If doctors hadn't insisted on carrying out an unnecessary test then the surgery would have been carried out at an earlier time - when there was a bed available.



Why did the doctors insist on carrying out a test to see if she has Cushing's syndrome even though she has already been diagnosed?

I suspect that doctors' restrictive practices are to blame.

How does she know the test was unnecessary?
That is a serious accusation that a doctor deliberately ordered a test that was not needed.
 

kittykat

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Now Medicine.ie?

I know that I am not qualified as a doctor. The mother of the girl impacted would not seem to be aware of her limited training. The headline should be in quotes. It is a opinion and could be construed as defamatory!:roll:
 

Texal Tom

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Brain surgery is a very serious affair - doctors need to make sure that their tests are 100% correct. Neuro surgery community are very small and no doubt work hard and this can't be in anyone's favour.... But joe won't mind so long as he gets his listeners excited sorry anton another spanner
 

ShoutingIsLeadership

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The OP seems to be focusing on a non-issue, to the detriment of the actual issue
 

davidcameron

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Doctors usually know best.
You need to prove these assertions of yours



Please specify

How does she know the test was unnecessary?
That is a serious accusation that a doctor deliberately ordered a test that was not needed.
The girl had already been diagnosed with Cushing's syndrome. So why would a test to see if she has Cushing's be necessary?
 

damus

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'How can you leave her like this?' - Mother's anguish as daughter (16) in need of brain surgery is turned away from Beaumont - Independent.ie



If doctors hadn't insisted on carrying out an unnecessary test then the surgery would have been carried out at an earlier time - when there was a bed available.



Why did the doctors insist on carrying out a test to see if she has Cushing's syndrome even though she has already been diagnosed?

I suspect that doctors' restrictive practices are to blame.
Nope, the acute shortage of beds is to blame. There's no point going ahead with neuro surgery if there's no ICU bed.
 

ShoutingIsLeadership

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The girl might have got a bed in the hospital if it hadn't been for a test for a condition she had already been diagnosed with.

The issue is the lack of beds. We have no evidence to support any accusation that the reason for wishing to perform the test, was anything other than for sound medical reasons.

What about the other eight who had surgery cancelled?
 

The Field Marshal

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The girl had already been diagnosed with Cushing's syndrome. So why would a test to see if she has Cushing's be necessary?
You and others may have the facts wrong.


The girl might have got a bed in the hospital if it hadn't been for a test for a condition she had already been diagnosed with.
Again where is the proof of this?

You really need to examine the medical records.

Are you a consultant doctor?
Do you know all the different tests involved and the dates required between tests?

I already asked you to specify alleged restrictive practices by doctors and there is nothing from you.

-------
 

ruserious

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Yet we still donate millions to Uganda despite having a higher spend on their military than we do.
 

Bea C

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You and others may have the facts wrong.




Again where is the proof of this?

You really need to examine the medical records.

Are you a consultant doctor?
Do you know all the different tests involved and the dates required between tests?

I already asked you to specify alleged restrictive practices by doctors and there is nothing from you.

-------
Well, if the Indo states it!
 

davidcameron

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Surely, she wouldn't have been admitted in the first place if there were no beds available. The fact that she was admitted leads me to believe that there was a bed available. The implication of the article is that she would have got a bed if it hadn't been for that test.
 

davidcameron

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I already asked you to specify alleged restrictive practices by doctors and there is nothing from you.

-------
In my opinion, testing a patient for a condition that the patient has already been diagnosed with is a restrictive practice. It's like the medical card applications officer asking the parents of a child with Down's syndrome whether the child still has Down's syndrome.
 


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