Does Connaught have a future?

Defeated Romanticist

Active member
Joined
Apr 12, 2007
Messages
277
Instad of balanced regional development, which suggests spreading economic development over one region equally, the regions should be treated as separate parts of a whole like we do for Tourism(even though that is a totally naff strategy for tourism)
Connacht must focus its economy onto where it can derive a comparitve advantage. Galway, Knock, Athlone and Sligo should be the areas focused on as the economic dynamos of the region.
Connacht is not the only disadvantaged area in Ireland. My own county of Wexford was the 6th poorest county in Ireland the last time I checked, despite many natural advantages
 


alonso

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 17, 2006
Messages
2,550
Defeated Romanticist said:
Instad of balanced regional development, which suggests spreading economic development over one region equally, the regions should be treated as separate parts of a whole like we do for Tourism(even though that is a totally naff strategy for tourism)
Connacht must focus its economy onto where it can derive a comparitve advantage. Galway, Knock, Athlone and Sligo should be the areas focused on as the economic dynamos of the region.
Connacht is not the only disadvantaged area in Ireland. My own county of Wexford was the 6th poorest county in Ireland the last time I checked, despite many natural advantages
I wouldn't define "balanced Regional Development" as spreading development over one region. I would define it more in terms of development proportionate to the assets of the region, which include traditional place in the hierarchy. In other words, if a region / county / townland / town has nothing to offer, then nothing should be pumped into it, over and above public services, just for the sake of it.

And yes, you're spot on about Connacht focussing it's economy, but as Schuhart said, it will never ever happen. Why in the name of God is there an Airport in Knock (did I just answer my own question?) instead of Sligo/Ballina etc? Why are they building a rail corridor to carry no-one while the cities choke? It's all nonsense, but after May 07, I have no sympathy for anyone on this island who complains about investment, healthcare, education and traffic. Ireland made it's bed, and Ireland can lie in it. The West therefore has no future.
 

mollox

Active member
Joined
May 14, 2007
Messages
202
alonso said:
And yes, you're spot on about Connacht focussing it's economy, but as Schuhart said, it will never ever happen. Why in the name of God is there an Airport in Knock (did I just answer my own question?) instead of Sligo/Ballina etc? Why are they building a rail corridor to carry no-one while the cities choke? It's all nonsense, but after May 07, I have no sympathy for anyone on this island who complains about investment, healthcare, education and traffic. Ireland made it's bed, and Ireland can lie in it. The West therefore has no future.
Any objective reading of Schuhart’s posts on the Knock thread , complemented by his contributions on other western-related threads on topics such as Shannon-Heathrow and the Western Rail Corridor, would confirm the inevitably (in a planner’s mind) of the outcome suggested in my earlier “National Park” hypothetical scenario for most of Connaught - even if it was arrived at by a different process and called something else. This view is reinforced by Schuhart’s views, again on the Knock thread, that worldwide depletion of fossil fuels will, within a relatively short period (10-20 years?) render Knock Airport obsolete and make unsustainable daily rural commutes of 20-30 miles.

The knock-on effects of these projected outcomes is to create a situation where there is no sustainable (as in unsubsidised) future for most of Connaught. But when I posted my hypothetical scenario, derived from the contributions of Schuhart and, to a lesser extent, Alonso, it was rubbished by Alonso. However, in his latest post he now tells us that “the West therefore has no future”.

And whose fault does Alonso think it is? Why the electorate in the West, of course.
Why do planners expect the great unwashed to provide leadership to the political leadership of the country? Do planners expect the people of the West to vote for their own extinction?
What party was offering something coherent and credible regarding regional development which might have provided some hope to the West?

And when it comes to Gombeenism, don’t look any further than Government Buildings where the 2003 Decentralisation Plan signed off by the current Taoiseach and his cabinet colleagues, including 2 PD ministers. Why would the ordinary people, or local politicians, pay the slightest attention to a National Spatial Strategy which was so shamelessly ignored by the Cabinet?

As I’ve already said on the Knock thread, there would be no airport anywhere in Mayo without Monsignor Horan, and because of him it would be nowhere else. He was primarily building an access point for pilgrims to his Marian Shrine, which might also benefit one of the most depopulated counties of the country.

Just for information, here’s a small table showing the relative populations of Mayo, Connaught & Co Dublin at a number of points in our history. It’s clear that balanced regional development hasn't been on the agenda until now, but it’s even clearer who is struggling for survival. Why the surprise that the inhabitants try every tactic to ensure they and their children live and work in the place they were reared in.

Isn’t it a pity that they can’t be as coldly clinical as a planner and just accept the inevitability of their fate? It would be so much less hassle.

Selected Irish Census Data ('000)
Year Mayo Conn. Dublin
1841 389 1419 373
1871 246 846 405
1971 110 391 852
2006 124 504 1187
 

Schuhart

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 24, 2006
Messages
4,831
mollox said:
Isn’t it a pity that they can’t be as coldly clinical as a planner and just accept the inevitability of their fate? It would be so much less hassle.
Can I firstly suggest that you consider the conditions that people in Connaught were living in 1841 before using that in a context where it might be mistakenly read. Its not the case that we're looking back on some wonderfully regionally balanced Ireland that somehow got lost along the way. When you consider the title of the 'Congested' Districts Board, I think its pretty clear that the West was traditionally overpopulated.

When you use the phrase 'inevitability of their fate' I really wonder what we're supposed to take out of that. Its not as if the alternative to living in Mayo is to be sold as a galley slave. Are we supposed to sit quietly and let the future of the country slip away again because apparently its 'coldly clinical' to object to good money being thrown after bad?

The question is whether we would rather have Irish people find they can make a life in Ireland, with our own Government and what goes with that, or whether we just want to give up on this national project and let people find their lives in London and New York instead. I'm honestly not convinced that many in the West have any commitment to the national concept - if it can't be Mayo, it might as well be London. I see that as them being 'coldly clinical'.

I've said it before and I'll say it again. Irish nation? I think it would be a great idea. But if we've no appetite to be a nation, why not stop pretending because we're only confusing each other.
 

mollox

Active member
Joined
May 14, 2007
Messages
202
Schuhart said:
Can I firstly suggest that you consider the conditions that people in Connaught were living in 1841 before using that in a context where it might be mistakenly read. Its not the case that we're looking back on some wonderfully regionally balanced Ireland that somehow got lost along the way. When you consider the title of the 'Congested' Districts Board, I think its pretty clear that the West was traditionally overpopulated.
I agree, the 1841 base figure shouldn’t be misrepresented as an indicator of the height of prosperity in the West, but it does provide an, albeit extreme, pre-famine marker as to the relative distribution of population and the size of Dublin City & County relative to the rest of the country. It, together with the subsequent population figures, provides a good indicator as to the scale of population imbalance achieved in the intervening period.

Schuhart said:
When you use the phrase 'inevitability of their fate' I really wonder what we're supposed to take out of that. Its not as if the alternative to living in Mayo is to be sold as a galley slave. Are we supposed to sit quietly and let the future of the country slip away again because apparently its 'coldly clinical' to object to good money being thrown after bad?
The question is whether we would rather have Irish people find they can make a life in Ireland, with our own Government and what goes with that, or whether we just want to give up on this national project and let people find their lives in London and New York instead. I'm honestly not convinced that many in the West have any commitment to the national concept - if it can't be Mayo, it might as well be London. I see that as them being 'coldly clinical'.
Do you consider it unnatural that people in the West desire to live and work there and see opportunities for their children to do likewise? Unlike many millions before them who were forced to migrate, internally or externally, in past decades? There’s a great quote from Dev each week at the start of RTEs The Week in Politics - “ No longer will our children, like our cattle, be brought up for export”. That actually means something in the West. In your own post-fossil fuel scenario, it might as well be London as Dublin.
There is a significant social context to all of this and your “good money after bad” could easily be perceived to smack of “knowing the price of everything and the value of nothing“.

Schuhart said:
I've said it before and I'll say it again. Irish nation? I think it would be a great idea. But if we've no appetite to be a nation, why not stop pretending because we're only confusing each other.
What exactly do you think is meant by “Irish Nation”? Do you think it means “survival of the fittest?” or “Every man for himself”?

Finally, on the Knock thread, you accused me of agreeing with your arguments but being unwilling to accept the inevitable conclusions. My “National Park” hypothesis for most of Connaught takes your view to its logical conclusion.

And here’s my question to you, Schuhart: Would you regard that outcome as (a) desirable or (b) acceptable or (c) just inevitable?

If the answer to any of these is in the affirmative, how would you classify the quality of the planning which has brought this about and who, other than the victims, would you blame?
 

alonso

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 17, 2006
Messages
2,550
Mollox, you are either blind or unwilling to read my posts. It's getting tiresome. On many threads now, I have put forward a rational solution to regional development and you've ignored them ad focussed on certain hyperbolic sentences I've written to highlight the problems. I'll respond in more detail later
 

nawbut

Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2004
Messages
38
going forward

I just cant see Connaught surviving, going forward, as a viable province. (Hey, then we will have only three Cúigí!).
 

mollox

Active member
Joined
May 14, 2007
Messages
202
alonso said:
Mollox, you are either blind or unwilling to read my posts. It's getting tiresome. On many threads now, I have put forward a rational solution to regional development and you've ignored them ad focussed on certain hyperbolic sentences I've written to highlight the problems. I'll respond in more detail later
Alonso, to be fair to you, I readily accept that you’re normally balanced in your commentary. However, you occasionally lose patience and throw in the odd hyperbolic sentence.

My real bete noir is Schuhart who seems to take a much more doctrinaire approach. He seems willing to accept the large scale denuding of large tracts of the country as a natural outcome. To me that seems like a failure of planning rather than an outcome of planning - if you know what I mean.

But what both of you share, in your frustration, is a propensity to blame the public for the way they vote, holding them responsible for their own misfortune. And “the people” are blamed for attempting to attract development to their own areas, in the absence of any perceptible implementation of a coherent spatial strategy.

The reality is that blame must be laid at the door of the Taoiseach and his cabinet, who displayed their own contempt for the NSS in 2003 with the decentralisation stroke.

My last contribution on the Knock thread suggested some steps that seemed to me to be required to establish political responsibility for implementing the NSS. Until those, or other more appropriate steps, are taken this will continue to meander on with lip service paid to the NSS but little leadership or control on day to day developments. Political advantage/risk will continue to be a major determinant in making decisions.

All politics are local and our system is heavily based on clientilism. This NSS issue is a fine example of what is wrong with that system and how it can create major problems at national policy level (never mind the health service). If you always do what you always did, then you’ll always get what you always got.
 

Schuhart

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 24, 2006
Messages
4,831
mollox said:
I agree, the 1841 base figure shouldn’t be misrepresented as an indicator of the height of prosperity in the West, but it does provide an, albeit extreme, pre-famine marker as to the relative distribution of population and the size of Dublin City & County relative to the rest of the country. It, together with the subsequent population figures, provides a good indicator as to the scale of population imbalance achieved in the intervening period.
You seem to be ignoring the general international trend to urbanise. Plus, alternatively, could we not say that the massive population imbalance was in 1841 which was why we experienced all that famine and emigration. In fact, has ‘balance’ any meaning in the current climate? What we’ve seen is urbanisation, with a fair amount of that happening in Dublin because of ultimately self-defeating actions taken to frustrate that new ‘balance’ emerging
mollox said:
Do you consider it unnatural that people in the West desire to live and work there and see opportunities for their children to do likewise?
I’ve no comment one way or the other on what people in the West desire. But I certainly do feel that quite a lot of Western advocacy supports policies that frustrate the prospect of their children staying in the region. However, the real problem is when they work to frustrate the prospect that Ireland generally might have a sustainable future.

You’ll know that story about there being no need to put a lid on a pot of Irish lobsters, because if one looks like escaping the rest will hold it down.
mollox said:
There’s a great quote from Dev each week at the start of RTEs The Week in Politics - “ No longer will our children, like our cattle, be brought up for export”. That actually means something in the West. In your own post-fossil fuel scenario, it might as well be London as Dublin.
You’ll hopefully understand that introducing the concept of ‘export’ within one country suggests a mindset. Can I also point out that if the national idea is gone – if truly there is no distinction between Dublin and London – where is the basis for an allegiance that would cause the East to resource the West without end?
mollox said:
There is a significant social context to all of this and your “good money after bad” could easily be perceived to smack of “knowing the price of everything and the value of nothing“.
I think this comment needs to have the air let out of it. Insisting that public resources should actually achieve something cannot be dismissed as of “knowing the price of everything and the value of nothing“. Picture yourself on a lifeboat after a shipwreck. There’s people in the water weakening. You notice some of the people sitting in the Western side of the lifeboat are using extra lifejackets as cushions. You suggest that those lifejackets would be better employed supporting the people in the water. Would those people on the Western side of the lifeboat be justified in saying you know the price of everything but the value of nothing?

Its very easy to dismiss price when someone else is facing the cost.
mollox said:
What exactly do you think is meant by “Irish Nation”? Do you think it means “survival of the fittest?” or “Every man for himself”?
No, that sort of why I query the view that simply doesn’t care about the consequences on the rest of the community of demands for resources. If the rest of the country is impoverished to obtain a small benefit for the West, so what? That looks to be what you are saying.
mollox said:
My “National Park” hypothesis for most of Connaught takes your view to its logical conclusion.

And here’s my question to you, Schuhart: Would you regard that outcome as (a) desirable or (b) acceptable or (c) just inevitable?
I doubt if Mayo will turn into a national park anytime soon. But what is inevitable, in a situation of ‘more of the same’, is that the relative population share of the East will continue to increase. That’s not necessarily a problem so long as we accept this reality and deal with it.
mollox said:
If the answer to any of these is in the affirmative, how would you classify the quality of the planning which has brought this about and who, other than the victims, would you blame?
The label ‘victim’ in this context is something the West desires, as who can expect anything of a victim. In truth, the real victims are the people who lose out because resources are wasted pointlessly. To take a recent thread that comes to mind about planning difficulties for a special school in Waterford, children with disabilities and their families become victims because they find our political system is so tied up with dealing with imaginary concerns (like the need to protect Mayo people from being sold as galley slaves) that there is no space left for real concerns.

We vote for our representatives. We choose them. If people in the West choose politicians because they want to be able to build a house wherever, then they are responsible for that action. The NSS concept makes sense. Government engagement will follow if that’s what people want, just as it delivered the self-defeating policies wanted thus far. But if you let people duck responsibilities for their own actions, nothing will change.
mollox said:
My real bete noir is Schuhart
I'm delighted at this honour. I hope I can live up to it.
 

mollox

Active member
Joined
May 14, 2007
Messages
202
Schuhart said:
Insisting that public resources should actually achieve something cannot be dismissed as of “knowing the price of everything and the value of nothing“. Picture yourself on a lifeboat after a shipwreck. There’s people in the water weakening. You notice some of the people sitting in the Western side of the lifeboat are using extra lifejackets as cushions. You suggest that those lifejackets would be better employed supporting the people in the water. Would those people on the Western side of the lifeboat be justified in saying you know the price of everything but the value of nothing?

Its very easy to dismiss price when someone else is facing the cost.
Those bastards sitting on the Western side, using lifejackets as cushions. What a very useful and appropriate analogy! Make them walk the plank.
You'd swear that there was a proposal to pay a "Western Dole", like the old farmer's dole.

Schuhart said:
We vote for our representatives. We choose them. If people in the West choose politicians because they want to be able to build a house wherever, then they are responsible for that action. The NSS concept makes sense. Government engagement will follow if that’s what people want, just as it delivered the self-defeating policies wanted thus far. But if you let people duck responsibilities for their own actions, nothing will change.
Where do you get your concept of leadership from? The government will follow the people when the people themselves change their direction/behaviour? Is that how it works? No wonder I’ve been confused. And if that's how you see implementation of the NSS actually happening, you can kiss it goodbye.
 

Schuhart

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 24, 2006
Messages
4,831
mollox said:
Those bastards sitting on the Western side, using lifejackets as cushions. What a very useful and appropriate analogy!
I thought so too. I had the daft Western Rail Corridor in mind as I wrote it.
mollox said:
Where do you get your concept of leadership from? The government will follow the people when the people themselves change their direction/behaviour? Is that how it works? No wonder I’ve been confused. And if that's how you see implementation of the NSS actually happening, you can kiss it goodbye.
It certainly will fail if people don't see a value in it. The information is there for people to make a judgement. I don't have to develop memory loss about my bank account just because the Taoiseach does the same.

Did your mother never say, as you attempted some lame excuse that everyone else was doing it, "and would you follow them if they walked off a cliff?"
 

mollox

Active member
Joined
May 14, 2007
Messages
202
Schuhart said:
Schuhart said:
We vote for our representatives. We choose them. If people in the West choose politicians because they want to be able to build a house wherever, then they are responsible for that action. The NSS concept makes sense. Government engagement will follow if that’s what people want, just as it delivered the self-defeating policies wanted thus far. But if you let people duck responsibilities for their own actions, nothing will change.
mollox said:
Where do you get your concept of leadership from? The government will follow the people when the people themselves change their direction/behaviour? Is that how it works? No wonder I’ve been confused. And if that's how you see implementation of the NSS actually happening, you can kiss it goodbye.
It certainly will fail if people don't see a value in it. The information is there for people to make a judgement. I don't have to develop memory loss about my bank account just because the Taoiseach does the same.

Did your mother never say, as you attempted some lame excuse that everyone else was doing it, "and would you follow them if they walked off a cliff?"
Surely you see that something as major as the NSS needs to be heavily and continually communicated by politicians and the benefits, and the associated pain, sold to the people. If necessary, it should be the subject of a referendum, if the politicians need that to give them political cover.

It also needs to be set up as a major programme, led from the very top of Govt, with clear goals, both annual and longer-term. Specific authority and responsibility must assigned to identifiable parties who must report progress at least annually to the Dail/people. The process would need to get about the same level of attention as the annual budget process currently does.

Placing responsibility on the mass of the populace is, frankly, a completely nonsensical proposition. No wonder it’s not working and you planners are so frustrated. But you’re taking it out on the wrong people.
 

Schuhart

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 24, 2006
Messages
4,831
mollox said:
Surely you see that something as major as the NSS needs to be heavily and continually communicated by politicians and the benefits, and the associated pain, sold to the people. If necessary, it should be the subject of a referendum, if the politicians need that to give them political cover.
Politicians are good at judging what can be sold. If they judge there's no votes in the NSS, that reflects what they feel is the reality on the ground.

I'm not saying that the electorate need to have a fully formed idea of the NSS before the political process will move. But they do have to articulate concerns that make it relevant and views that make it feasible. Its a democracy. We get what we vote for.
 

mollox

Active member
Joined
May 14, 2007
Messages
202
Schuhart said:
mollox said:
Surely you see that something as major as the NSS needs to be heavily and continually communicated by politicians and the benefits, and the associated pain, sold to the people. If necessary, it should be the subject of a referendum, if the politicians need that to give them political cover.
Politicians are good at judging what can be sold. If they judge there's no votes in the NSS, that reflects what they feel is the reality on the ground.

I'm not saying that the electorate need to have a fully formed idea of the NSS before the political process will move. But they do have to articulate concerns that make it relevant and views that make it feasible. Its a democracy. We get what we vote for.
But surely that implies that some sort of major process involving the public is needed to educate, present options and derive an agreed NSS if the current model is unsaleable?

What is the point of the Govt purporting to adopt the NSS which it is then unwilling to implement because of the political risks involved?

Again - it's the politicians you should be attacking rather than the electorate.
If there is no political will to enforce implementation of the NSS then it ceases to exist as a strategy and becomes merely a well-meaning aspiration.
The Govt has the clear responsibility to either implement it's own NSS or modify it so that it can be implemented.
 

owenfeehan

Member
Joined
Jun 4, 2005
Messages
54
Fionn_McCool said:
On the continent parties like the Lega Nord in Italy and the Christian Social Union of Bavaria also advocate some form of separation for their own regions, but they have not been very successful in the polls. I predict that any political party stupid enough to advocate regionalism in Ireland would quickly suffer the same fate as the PDs.
Not to deliberately nit pick, but fyi, the Christian Social Union is and has been a very successful party at the polls in that has ruled Bavaria basically uninterruped since after WW2. And it doesn't operate anywhere other than Bavaria.

It's recently-departed chairman (Stoiber) also almost became Chancellor of Germany in the Bundestag elections of 2002, being narrowly defeated by Schroeder.... despite the fact the CSU party only operates in Bavaria. The party caucuses with the CDU who operate everywhere else except Bavaria.

Bavarians tend to be quite independent and have tendencies towards Bavarian cultural nationalism to some degree, but the nobody seriously advocates separation, in any form. The German system is pretty federal as it stands.
 

Schuhart

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 24, 2006
Messages
4,831
mollox said:
Again - it's the politicians you should be attacking rather than the electorate.
I take it we both know that we can circle endlessly on this. There simply is enough information out there for people to make a choice. If people are willing to ignore all that, they simply are responsible. I'd stress again that I'm not expecting the whole electorate to read every page of research commissioned for the NSS. Just the normal commonsense view is enough.

If politicians felt that people were more interested in real outcomes, that's what they'd deliver. The process has to start with the electorate. Its all about us and what attitudes we project in the public space.
 

mollox

Active member
Joined
May 14, 2007
Messages
202
Schuhart said:
mollox said:
Again - it's the politicians you should be attacking rather than the electorate.
I take it we both know that we can circle endlessly on this. There simply is enough information out there for people to make a choice. If people are willing to ignore all that, they simply are responsible. I'd stress again that I'm not expecting the whole electorate to read every page of research commissioned for the NSS. Just the normal commonsense view is enough.

If politicians felt that people were more interested in real outcomes, that's what they'd deliver. The process has to start with the electorate. Its all about us and what attitudes we project in the public space.
Your willingness to absolve the Government of it’s clear and undeniable responsibilities in this matter is touching but highly suspicious.
While at times you appear to display a considerable intelligence, your conclusion in this matter is both naïve and ridiculous.
You’re not connected to the current regime by any chance?
 

Schuhart

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 24, 2006
Messages
4,831
mollox said:
While at times you appear to display a considerable intelligence,
I'm actually a computer simulation, so your statement 'appear to display a considerable intelligence' is remarkably perceptive.
mollox said:
your conclusion in this matter is both naïve and ridiculous.
Would that it were. Unfortunately, my conclusion is neither of those things.
mollox said:
You’re not connected to the current regime by any chance?
Only in the Buddhist sense that everything is one connected reality, and our notion of independent selfhood is an illusion.

For what its worth, I voted Labour last time out (although strictly speaking my first preference was for an ex Labour independent candidate). Put quickly, my reason was that feeling that our public services should be better than they are. I don't feel Labour are brilliant and would agree they can be too attached to advocating a public service union view. I simply judged them, on balance, to be closest to the position I supported. After that (iirc), I put Green. In later preferences I would (and did) put FF ahead of FG.
 

Justin Ó Bradáin

New member
Joined
Oct 23, 2007
Messages
1
mollox said:
alonso said:
Interesting post mollox. It depends on the region's raison d'etre. It won't ever be the economic engine of the island, but it has the potential to look after itself if the major centres are consolidated, as we discussed on the Knock thread. As you suggested " significant changes to the current scattered nature of the distribution of its population, or measures to substantially increase that population" are required. If the growth in the West's population was focussed into these centres, then there is no reason that infrastructural investments will not deliver value for money.
Just to clarify - rather than “suggesting” this, I was making the point that this was a natural outcome if your, and Schuhart’s, “balanced regional development” approach has, as a prerequisite, a requirement that all such regions be ultimately self-financing.

Alonso, going back to my original post, can I ask you to address the following hypothesis, please?

The Regional feasibility study has been completed and finds that the only existing area of Connaught that has a viable financial future is a band approx. 20-30 miles wide, spanning either side of the existing road and rail infrastructure between Athlone & Galway. For the sake of simplicity, let’s say Co Galway and the southern end of Co Roscommon which falls within the catchment area of Athlone.

This economic Galway/Roscommon strip area can be part of a larger viable Region, either linked to the midlands, or alternatively linked with Limerick and Cork to make a strong South-West Region (ref. Dr Ed Walsh).

However, attempting to provide the services and infrastructure to support the low density, relatively poor counties of Mayo, North Roscommon, Sligo & Leitrim drags Galway, and it’s potential new regional partners, below breakeven in every economic scenario modelled.

Consequently, the recommendation is that Mayo, Sligo etc. be designated a National Park.
All future development there, commercial and residential, to be banned. All state agencies instructed not to place any incoming enterprises in these areas, even in existing empty industrial units. All state aid/grants etc for business start-ups no longer apply in the National Park. Depts of Education, Health etc instructed to limit future investment there to minimum maintenance level possible. Etc etc etc.

Now - the questions:
1. Do you think that such an outcome would be politically viable?
2. Do you think it would be acceptable to the population of the country at large?
Convert the west of irelandinto a national park!? Are you out of your mind!? the west is my home, i am from the town of westport in county mayo and i for one believe that westport is an extremely important tourist town with great infrastructure and many people of the middle classes reside there. you seem to be suggesting some sort of mass movement of the people of the west. the west is their home. you seem to be making the west out to be a virtually unpopulated with the exception of galway and roscommon, this simply isnt the case
 

Schuhart

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 24, 2006
Messages
4,831
Justin Ó Bradáin said:
many people of the middle classes reside there.
what are we supposed to see as significant in this statement?
Justin Ó Bradáin said:
you seem to be suggesting some sort of mass movement of the people of the west. the west is their home. you seem to be making the west out to be a virtually unpopulated with the exception of galway and roscommon, this simply isnt the case
No, I think the argument is that by choosing to maintain a dispersed settlement pattern the West is the architect of its own problems.
 


New Threads

Popular Threads

Most Replies

Top